Would like some advice

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F250_IDI_Scott

Rank I
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Contributor II

271
Salem, OR, USA
First Name
Scott
Last Name
Clawson
Member #

20131

Hey everyone, I have a 1990 Ford F-250 extended cab, 7.3IDI, five speed manual that I am about to start getting equipment for. I am having work done on the motor, transmission, and drivetrain right now so mechanically she is amazing. I am having an engine brake installed as well to assist with the downgrades. I would love to hear some ideas or thoughts you all may have on what other equipment I should get. I would like to get advice on practical and luxury items in case I have some money left over after the complete build. I am also thinking about getting an extra diesel tank in the bed for those really long trips, what are all your opinions on the added weight? Thanks in advance and excited to hear what ideas you all have. If you have links to the equipment you are mentioning I would greatly appriciate those as well. Thanks again!
 

FUNHOGN (aka Maurice)

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Prescott Valley, Arizona
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13162

What kind of trips are you envisioning? Lots and lots of off road? Or a mix of on/off road? What's the expected range with the stock tank? If you are near or above 650 miles per tank it's probably not necessary for an extra in bed tank (imho). If you do need more range, does an in bed tank (while cheap to install) take up to much valuable room that an underbody tank would be better? Or just a couple of 5gal Jerry cans enough?
 

MMc

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Southern Califoria
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Mike
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McMullen
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18647

Great truck! What are you plans? Where are you planning on going? What have you been using? What is your background? If you are playing in the mud or sand the extra tank adds more weight and problems. If you are going for long drives, it would be great.
What are you doing for recovery? How do you camp? I would start with a simple camp set up, table, stove, sunshade, chairs and ice chest. Sleep in a ground tent, if you are starting out. You can always add to your camp and rig.
 

Trent Munson

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Iowa Colony, TX, USA
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Trent
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Munson
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17961

It does really depend on your style of camping that would dictate the kind of outfitting you'll be doing on your rig. But with that much truck, you could put just about anything on it and still have the power, suspension and room for more. I'm with @MMc, keep it simple, and work up from there. *Best advise I ever received was KISS (keep it simple stupid)*
 
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adventure_is_necessary

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Influencer II

3,626
Emporia, KS
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7082

Like a few above me have stated, think about where you plan on going and what you're going to do there. That should help give you a better idea of what to do to the truck. Good tires are a must regardless. Some recovery gear is needed as well. First aid, comms, flat repair and air are some other areas to consider. If you get into some tricky spots, more lift, bigger tires, and armor are needed. Lockers and a winch are secondary items. Check out Michael's latest video as it explains his ideas of needs vs. wants, which I've somewhat outlined here. Hope this helps! Also, just start slow with a few items and get out there to see what you can and can't do. Once you have that figured out and you see what you want to do and where you want to go, let your modifications help you to accomplish that. At least that's how my build has come together. Slow, but I've added items that some don't consider necessary, but I feel they are. Have fun and enjoy it!
 

F250_IDI_Scott

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Contributor II

271
Salem, OR, USA
First Name
Scott
Last Name
Clawson
Member #

20131

Hey Everyone, Thank you very much for all the advice so far. I am planning on using this truck for long overlanding trips. Not so much black diamond stuff (have a Rubicon for that) but more trail type stuff in the middle of no where. I really want to go on some Mohave runs. I live in Oregon and have ample amount of logging trails to run on. I have thought long and hard about tent type and have decided to go with a bed rack and rooftop tent. I dont want a hard case or a camper, mainly because I need to be able to remove the whole thing easily so I can still use my truck for my farm stuff and I dont want to have to put my spare tires or fuel cans in a camper. I also have three kids which can sleep on a cot below the fold out part of the tent to stay dry and my wife and I have more than enough room together in the tent. I have noticed that hard shells reduce the overall usable space quite a bit. I dont want a canopy because I typically pack very methodically and I want to be able to access the whole bed from outside without having to crawl into the back like you do with a canopy.

I have been saving up for some time in order to prepare and be able to purchase most of what I need at once. I have around $10,000 saved up now which should be able to get me most of what I need. My biggest goal is to be able to live out of the truck for a few weeks at a time on very long trips while being efficient and comfortable. As far as recovery stuff currently I have a Warn 10k winch on the front and plan to purchase some MaxTrax along with carry shovel and hand tools. I do plan to always make room for my chain saw in case I ever need to clear a trail I am driving down as well. I also plan to have full mechanics tools so I can assist other drivers if need be. I know I can get better fuel efficiency with fuel injection but I also know I cant work on fuel injection in the field. So I am sticking with the indirect injection on the turbo-ed 7.3 harvester.

I have been looking at the "Nuthouse Industries" full bed rack (Nutzo - Tech 2 series Expedition Truck Bed Rack - Nuthouse Industries) with a Ruggedized Tepui rooftop tent (Ruggedized Series Autana 3 with Annex). what are all your thoughts on those?

I also would like advice on navigation units and communications devices. Preferably devices with extra long range in case I am out for a few weeks in the middle of nowhere and need assistance. I know nothing about electronics but know that navigation and communication are two of the biggest and most important safety devices one can have while on long trips in the middle of no where. So truly, any advice in this field is very much appreciated.

Again, Thank you very much for all the advice so far. I am very excited to hear what else you all have to say. Any advice is, and always will be appreciated.
 

F250_IDI_Scott

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Contributor II

271
Salem, OR, USA
First Name
Scott
Last Name
Clawson
Member #

20131

Great truck! What are you plans? Where are you planning on going? What have you been using? What is your background? If you are playing in the mud or sand the extra tank adds more weight and problems. If you are going for long drives, it would be great.
What are you doing for recovery? How do you camp? I would start with a simple camp set up, table, stove, sunshade, chairs and ice chest. Sleep in a ground tent, if you are starting out. You can always add to your camp and rig.
Thank you! She is truly my favorite truck I have ever had and I have had brand new Dodges, Fords, and Chevy's. I am not particular to either but this generation, hands down in my opinion Ford really did rule the market and to this day I would choose this truck over most brand new trucks. heavy but sometimes when you need traction the most, heavy can be good lol. She also gets better fuel economy than our Rubicon plus dual tanks which I just love. The shorty dual exhaust comes out just behind the cab on both sides, doesn't go all the way back so I dont have to worry about taking out my exhaust if I back into a rock that is just slightly too high. The granny gear is truly a granny gear. I can slowly let the granny gear out without giving any fuel and she will start going. Uphills are a breeze or going over big rocks in nothing with this manual transmission. The new engine brake I am having installed will save the brakes a ton, especially when going down the backside of a mountain. With a truck this heavy you dont want to be riding those brakes. I will have this truck probably until I die.
 
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MMc

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Southern Califoria
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Mike
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McMullen
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F250_ILD_Scot, Go with a regular garden shovel and a collapsible shovel. When you are digging yourself out a full size shovel is so much easier on you, less time on you knees. If you're under the truck digging, a small one is the way to go. The "t" handle are fashionable but you have the room for a full size.
Garmin stuff is great. You need to make sure the folks at home know how to follow you, the texting can come in handy.
I would look at a hard top tent, most of the fabric tents are not that good. I have spent more night then most sleeping in tents. the right tent for the situation makes a huge difference, most of the fabric tents are weak 3 seasons . The hard tops seem to be more water tight and better put together. IMHO. Here is a review for you. A quality product only hurt once.
 
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F250_IDI_Scott

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271
Salem, OR, USA
First Name
Scott
Last Name
Clawson
Member #

20131

F250_ILD_Scot, Go with a regular garden shovel and a collapsible shovel. When you are digging yourself out a full size shovel is so much easier on you, less time on you knees. If you're under the truck digging, a small one is the way to go. The "t" handle are fashionable but you have the room for a full size.
Garmin stuff is great. You need to make sure the folks at home know how to follow you, the texting can come in handy.
I would look at a hard top tent, most of the fabric tents are not that good. I have spent more night then most sleeping in tents. the right tent for the situation makes a huge difference, most of the fabric tents are weak 3 seasons . The hard tops seem to be more water tight and better put together. IMHO. Here is a review for you. A quality product only hurt once.
Thank you very much for the advice! The biggest thing I am concerned with about hard top tents is the room. The Tepui tent I posted above states it is a queen size bed, some of the reviews online state it may be a tad bit larger than queen. When my wife and I are both in the tent how much room do you think the hard tops have compared to a full queen fold out tent? Is it enough for two? I have only read reviews online, have not seen one in person. I do like the sleek look and the protection the hard top offers, just convincing my wife to get a much smaller tent will prove difficult. What are your thoughts on the room?
 

MMc

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Mike
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McMullen
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No idea, I sleep in the back of my truck on on the ground. I looked at the tents At the Overland west, the hard tops looked so much better made. My wife and I slept in ground tents, our home bed was a full size. Some of the tents were as wide as the truck is. The 2 couples who are friends that had a RTT's on the Pan American both had trouble with rain and moisture under the pad. Both had fabric tents.
 
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trikebubble

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Advocate I

2,522
Penticton, BC
Member #

1969

Thank you very much! I will check out that Garmin Inreach. Obviously you like that Garmin, is there anything you think I should steer clear from?
Si can't comment on the other options. I like the InReach Explorer. I bought it before we drove to Tuk last summer, I wanted a means of communication in the event of an emergency. I like that if I'm traveling solo out of cell range I can text my Wife to let her know I'm ok. I can also let people track my/our progress on a map via the Garmin website. We also use it hiking and camounf locally all the time. It can connect to my phone via Bluetooth, so I can send/receive messages via my phone.
 
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