Whoopie Sling for recovery?

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justjames

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I've been hauling around a 100' section of 3/8" Dyneema as a winch extension. I've never found a method that I liked for shortening it if it became necessary. I recently came across "whoopie slings" in the hammock world using 1/8" Dyneema and that sparked the idea. As it turns out, they were apparently invented in the arborist trades. As an experiment, I made one with my rope. On one end I left a fixed eye with a steel thimble and then measured a 15' span followed by a 10' bury. This would allow easy adjustments from roughly 25' to a little over 60'. It seems to work very well and I've tested it by towing my truck on an uphill grade. I realize that is not a true stress test, it's not even a hard test but it was all I was willing to try without consulting the experts.

Anyone tried this or more importantly, know of a reason not to use this?
 

systemdelete

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justjames

Rank VI
Member

Traveler I

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Chapel Hill, North Carolina
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9429

With the proper bury(figured by rope diameter and strand count) 12 strand dyneema will still have its most of it's nearly 20k breaking strength. In the marine environment when used for towing they often just have fixed loops via a bury at each end.

Splicing is the preferred method of terminating amsteel and similar rope.

https://www.samsonrope.com/docs/default-source/splice-instructions/12strand_c2_whoopie_sling_amsteel_amsteel-blue_web.pdf?sfvrsn=ae4d2872_2

How to Splice Rope
Good info there @systemdelete. According to Sampson the appropriate bury length is about 28" so my 10' is a little overkill but it suits my purpose.
 
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