What is your favorite overland/camp stove?

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enjoitheride

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I have some Coleman, Primus, and MSR stoves. I’m actually holding out for the GSI Pinnacle Pro, if they ever release it.
 

terryg

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I have a coleman or coleman knockoff and its good.

However i have always wondered about the ones that run on gasoline. dual fuel sounds really cool.

I have a Coleman dual fuel stove. It works fine with gasoline, but gets very gritty. After one trial with gasoline, I switched back to white gas.
 

terryg

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For backpacking, I use the MSR Pocket Rocket. It has never failed me. For overland camping, I use the propane stove in my Sportsmobile. When I want to cook outside of the van, I use a Coleman butane powered single burner stove I bought at a Coleman outlet store for $25.
 

Asuarez_673

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Personally I run different cooking setups. Last time I went to overland expo there was a booth for camp maid. They had a bunch of neat cast iron stuff, but I ended up getting the dutch oven and its been amazing. I've made everything with it, and pizza is a lot of fun to make with it, honestly it was the reason why I even bought it. On my drawer system I got a 2 burner Coleman which was handed down to me and is my go to for most of the time. Jetboil is amazing for boiling water if you just want a quick meal like ramen, or for some coffee in the morning. its really hard to narrow it down to 1 for everything, it really just comes down to you to how intricate you want to make your meals.

I've gone out with people who are nothing but hotdogs and burgers, and then I've gone out with some who want to be on the next episode of top chef. Honestly a lot of the previous comments would be amazing.
 

Billiebob

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I have a coleman or coleman knockoff and its good.

However i have always wondered about the ones that run on gasoline. dual fuel sounds really cool.

white gas is pure, gasoline has all kinds of additives which plug things up

for convenience when space and weight don't factor in propane is an economical choice IF you can fit a cheap 20# tank.
for pure performance and lightweight, white gas.
Lots of other chouces to fit your style.

If you could care less about the environment go for disposable propane or butane cylinders.
Refillable, 5#, 10#, 20# cylinders say you care. 20#ers are the inexpensive choice.

Propane can do it all off one 20# cylinder, cooking, refrigeration, furnace, instant hot water.... propane is economical and the market, choices, products unlimited.
Propanes only achilies heel is high elevations, above 9000' performance really drops off.
Over 9000', the only choice is white gas.

If you leave North America, anything pressure related is subject to new regukations, for that reason white gas pours into the stove with just a funnel.

Sometimes charcol is the winner.
18813178_10154703961211545_4114825688561893929_n.jpeg
 
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old_man

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If you could care less about the environment go for disposable propane or butane cylinders.
Refillable, 5#, 10#, 20# cylinders say you care. 20#ers are the inexpensive choice.

Propane can do it all off one 20# cylinder, cooking, refrigeration, furnace, instant hot water.... propane is economical and the market, choices, products unlimited.
Propanes only achilies heel is high elevations, above 9000' performance really drops off.
Over 9000', the only choice is white gas.

Sometimes charcol is the winner.
That is funny. I have lived in Colorado for over 50 years, many above 9000 ft. We heated a home with propane and used propane stoves. I have camped at 11,000ft and had no big issues with propane. Yes, the flame is a bit weaker due to less oxygen but on most grills there is a simple adjustment that will compensate a bunch. My stove top is a bit harder to light but works just fine.

This is at over 9k elevation.
Camp Dick Open.jpg
 

ScottE

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Partner Steel 22" two burner stove. Built like a tank, great flame control, and windscreen.
 
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uncompromise

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Not many things are more crucial to a good trip than a nice meal. Having the tools to cook a nice meal can be hard to come by especially with all the different fuel types and makes of stoves that exist. I have used all sorts of Coleman stoves, backpacking stoves, single burner and duel burner stoves, but honestly I was never really satisfied with them. Like most other gear, sometimes cooking stoves are a trial by fire. I personally have ruled out propane, ISO butane, and butane as viable fuel sources for my camp stoves. I use gasoline, white gas, or the wood fire took cook now. However, I still had one issue with white gas stoves. It seemed that on the market you either could buy a portable white gas stove that is like cooking on a jet engine, or a stove that is so large the practicality of taking it on trips are lost. I am looking at the MSR dragon fly as my go-to stove now. With the mindset that the stove saves space, is durable, is reliable, and has the real capability to simmer. If you could only have one reliable cooking source/system what would it be?


I’ve had this exact unit for almost 15 years. It‘s robust, reliable, and light weight, and is our primary stove for all adventures. Someone asked about using it with cast iron - I don’t think It would be able to handle the weight on its own, so you would need some sort of stand to put over the top of it, which may well defeat the purpose of having this particular unit. Dan Grec has a great breakdown on stoves for overlanding, and I agree with his logic. I was in Australia when I bought the MSR - had I seen the Coleman he uses, I likely would have gone with that instead - it looks a lot less fiddly than the MSR.

 
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Billiebob

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That is funny. I have lived in Colorado for over 50 years, many above 9000 ft. We heated a home with propane and used propane stoves. I have camped at 11,000ft and had no big issues with propane. Yes, the flame is a bit weaker due to less oxygen but on most grills there is a simple adjustment that will compensate a bunch. My stove top is a bit harder to light but works just fine.

This is at over 9k elevation.
View attachment 189582
yes, yes, thing is compare, boil water on a white gas burner and a propane burner..... see which one boils water first
you'll never use propane again at high elevations if weight, efficiency, cost are considerations

Housing is not the same as camping, but there are better choices than propane, even in Colorado.

DSC_0064.jpg
 

Billiebob

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I’ve had this exact unit for almost 15 years. It‘s robust, reliable, and light weight, and is our primary stove for all adventures. Someone asked about using it with cast iron - I don’t think It would be able to handle the weight on its own, so you would need some sort of stand to put over the top of it, which may well defeat the purpose of having this particular unit. Dan Grec has a great breakdown on stoves for overlanding, and I agree with his logic. I was in Australia when I bought the MSR - had I seen the Coleman he uses, I likely would have gone with that instead - it looks a lot less fiddly than the MSR.

35 years ago, in a mountain hut near the continental divide, a guy had the MSR stove, it was leaking and the counter was on fire, we had a Coleman Peak I, next time we saw him, he had the Coleman Peak I too. The hut, Bow Hut is in the background... 1985?

Skiing in August love it.

Bow Hut 1984 ?.jpeg



The fire was on the window sill, and the outhouses hang over a cliff, they pick up the 50 gallon black water barrel with a helicopter.
Amazingly there are a his and a hers outhouse.

BOW Outhouses.jpeg

From across the valley you can see the hut and the 2 outhouses on the ridge.

Frank, Terry, Bill.jpeg

and the beauty of sunrise on Kodachrome

Sandra Nicholas Peak.jpeg
 
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KonzaLander

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I still bring my slightly bulky but ultra reliable Coleman 425 everywhere with propane conversion. It works well and hasn't been a problem at 1,200' here in Kansas to 10,500' in Colorado. The white gas MSR Whisper light is for motorcycle trips.

PXL_20201215_030837831.NIGHT.jpg
 
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FishinCrzy

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I love coleman products, but I could not pass up the deal I got on my Martin 2 burner propane stove. I carry a small 5lb tank that fits almost anywhere. It' will last us a week of cook time and it's a compact tidy package.View attachment 189603
What kind of quick connect looking thingy is that? Is that a modification or ....never mind, now I see what I'm looking at. I just ordered a five lb. tank should be here this week. Already got the hose for connection to 2 burner coleman.
 

pcstockton

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How do you like it? I’ve been thinking about one forever, but can’t seem to pull the trigger.
I simply adore it. Used it recently at home when the power went out for 4 days. Love that there are no sides so you can use a big cast iron skillet or pan.
The piezo lighters are very nice.

Get it when REI has a 25% off one item sale. Jetboil also has sales fairly often.

I love that it runs off propane which is much better in the cold than isobutane used in their other stoves.

The wind shield is junk. So do not be disappointed when you see one. The bag, pot and pan are amazing.
 

enjoitheride

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How do you like it? I’ve been thinking about one forever, but can’t seem to pull the trigger.
I simply adore it. Used it recently at home when the power went out for 4 days. Love that there are no sides so you can use a big cast iron skillet or pan.
The piezo lighters are very nice.

Get it when REI has a 25% off one item sale. Jetboil also has sales fairly often.

I love that it runs off propane which is much better in the cold than isobutane used in their other stoves.

The wind shield is junk. So do not be disappointed when you see one. The bag, pot and pan are amazing.
Thanks so much for the feedback! It seems the consensus is, the windscreen sucks. I love how compact the unit is, and their pot and pan seem nice. Thank you, again.
 

GXExplorer

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Craigslist find Camp Chef Mountaineer. Because I couldn’t wait for nor really afford that beautiful 22” partner stove.