SVO ....Small Vehicle Overlanding

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Lunch Box

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I need a ruling. I'm almost finished getting my new rig ready. It's a '48 CJ2A. It's about the size of a Samurai and weighs ~1800 lbs. Does that count for SVO?
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CR-Venturer

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I need a ruling. I'm almost finished getting my new rig ready. It's a '48 CJ2A. It's about the size of a Samurai and weighs ~1800 lbs. Does that count for SVO?
View attachment 204914
Given how tiny the Willie's and it's civilian iteration the CJ are, my vote is that they qualify as SVO's. I for one would love to see an overland build on one of these.
 

Sierrahotel83

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So I have lurked for years off and on on this forum, but my vehicle could get stuck on slick grass (civic) but recently I had to get a new vehicle, not a great time due to demand and prices. I got a 2011 Jeep Compass, mostly it was the one vehicle on the lot I liked and was in the price range I was looking for. Sadly in some of my looking there are not a ton of options I can find for roof racks aside from going traditional crossbars and then a basket. I look forward to seeing what I can do with this Rig, and where I can go as well.

On another note, the other day I saw a vehicle that I am not sure I would say was small, but it was a misfit for sure, and I hope to see it again so I can try to get a picture, but it was a lifted, AWD Sienna(I think) with AT tires, a swing out spare carrier, and a roof rack/ basket. pretty cool to see what people do with what they have. and having road tripped and camped out of a minivan a few years ago, actually pretty great for that
 

CR-Venturer

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Member III

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So I have lurked for years off and on on this forum, but my vehicle could get stuck on slick grass (civic) but recently I had to get a new vehicle, not a great time due to demand and prices. I got a 2011 Jeep Compass, mostly it was the one vehicle on the lot I liked and was in the price range I was looking for. Sadly in some of my looking there are not a ton of options I can find for roof racks aside from going traditional crossbars and then a basket. I look forward to seeing what I can do with this Rig, and where I can go as well.

On another note, the other day I saw a vehicle that I am not sure I would say was small, but it was a misfit for sure, and I hope to see it again so I can try to get a picture, but it was a lifted, AWD Sienna(I think) with AT tires, a swing out spare carrier, and a roof rack/ basket. pretty cool to see what people do with what they have. and having road tripped and camped out of a minivan a few years ago, actually pretty great for that
I wonder if it was an OB member you saw, because someone on this forum with a lifted AWD Sienna with a tire carrier etc. Minivans are definitely among the most versatile vehicles out there. Definitely not a Small Vehicle Overlander though.

I can't speak for everyone, but my feeling is that this thread is really about small, compact vehicles used for overlanding, not so much about unusual vehicles. I wish I had a screenshot from the drone footage we took on our Squamish to Indian arm day trip, because it illustrates this concept beautifully I think. Seen from above especially, the CR-V is dwarfed by all the other rigs in the convoy. We had a Taco, an F150, a 4runner, a jeep TJ and an H3 Hummer, and the V looks markedly smaller than all of them.

Tiny vehicles jave their own challenges and advantages in overlanding that make them quite interesting, and it's for that reason that I think that vehicles like the original Willy's jeep or the Canadian Iltis qualify as SVO's - because they share those challenges and advantages, whereas even a 2 door jeep Wrangler really doesn't.
 

Lunch Box

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Advocate II

Tiny vehicles jave their own challenges and advantages in overlanding that make them quite interesting, and it's for that reason that I think that vehicles like the original Willy's jeep or the Canadian Iltis qualify as SVO's - because they share those challenges and advantages, whereas even a 2 door jeep Wrangler really doesn't.
I tend to agree with that. Moving from a Crew Cab F350 PS to a CJ2A has made me rethink my loadout drastically. Since I'm keeping it stock, items like roof top tents or very bulky/heavy items are out. Everything I'm carrying has to share space in the tiny back cargo area with a 110lb bloodhound. It's not like going back to backpacking, but it isn't too far off. A buddy of mine has a 1943 Bantam jeep trailer that he *might* part with for an exorbitant sum, or I might look into building a period-ish teardrop trailer to haul our extra gear.
 

Sierrahotel83

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I wonder if it was an OB member you saw, because someone on this forum with a lifted AWD Sienna with a tire carrier etc. Minivans are definitely among the most versatile vehicles out there. Definitely not a Small Vehicle Overlander though.

I can't speak for everyone, but my feeling is that this thread is really about small, compact vehicles used for overlanding, not so much about unusual vehicles. I wish I had a screenshot from the drone footage we took on our Squamish to Indian arm day trip, because it illustrates this concept beautifully I think. Seen from above especially, the CR-V is dwarfed by all the other rigs in the convoy. We had a Taco, an F150, a 4runner, a jeep TJ and an H3 Hummer, and the V looks markedly smaller than all of them.

Tiny vehicles jave their own challenges and advantages in overlanding that make them quite interesting, and it's for that reason that I think that vehicles like the original Willy's jeep or the Canadian Iltis qualify as SVO's - because they share those challenges and advantages, whereas even a 2 door jeep Wrangler really doesn't.

Makes sense, I keep getting what I would say are mixed signals, some people talking misfits and other SV. I can see where each have their own issues for sure.
 

CR-Venturer

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J
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S
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I wonder if it was an OB member you saw, because someone on this forum with a lifted AWD Sienna with a tire carrier etc. Minivans are definitely among the most versatile vehicles out there. Definitely not a Small Vehicle Overlander though.

I can't speak for everyone, but my feeling is that this thread is really about small, compact vehicles used for overlanding, not so much about unusual vehicles. I wish I had a screenshot from the drone footage we took on our Squamish to Indian arm day trip, because it illustrates this concept beautifully I think. Seen from above especially, the CR-V is dwarfed by all the other rigs in the convoy. We had a Taco, an F150, a 4runner, a jeep TJ and an H3 Hummer, and the V looks markedly smaller than all of them.

Tiny vehicles jave their own challenges and advantages in overlanding that make them quite interesting, and it's for that reason that I think that vehicles like the original Willy's jeep or the Canadian Iltis qualify as SVO's - because they share those challenges and advantages, whereas even a 2 door jeep Wrangler really doesn't.

Makes sense, I keep getting what I would say are mixed signals, some people talking misfits and other SV. I can see where each have their own issues for sure.
It would be fun to have a "Misfit Overlanders" thread. Lifted Cadillac Eldorado anyone? Lol
 

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I consider Jeep wrangler/TJ/CJ/etc, toyota taco/4 runner, as the non misfits. The cool crew rigs! ha ha. I consider small rigs like our patriot, rav 4, crv etc misfits as they are not popular. But will go 90 perecnt of the places they are pointed. I had 2 wrangler JKU's. I wheeled them around here extensively and actually only shifted into 4wd once. That's what our trails are like. rocky trails with lots of grip, no mud unless the spring of the year, and no rock krawling. So the pat is much better on gas, and fits the bill much better for us.
 

CR-Venturer

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I consider Jeep wrangler/TJ/CJ/etc, toyota taco/4 runner, as the non misfits. The cool crew rigs! ha ha. I consider small rigs like our patriot, rav 4, crv etc misfits as they are not popular. But will go 90 perecnt of the places they are pointed. I had 2 wrangler JKU's. I wheeled them around here extensively and actually only shifted into 4wd once. That's what our trails are like. rocky trails with lots of grip, no mud unless the spring of the year, and no rock krawling. So the pat is much better on gas, and fits the bill much better for us.
One of the things I find the most fun about off roading the CR-V is the challenge. Because it doesn't have massive flex, sway bar disconnects, locking diffs, or even low range or selectable 4wd, it forces you to be a better driver. Things like line selection, throttle control and tire placement become absolutely crucial, because the machine isn't doing a huge amount to compensate for you. If you're driving a jeep Rubicon rolling around on 35's with both axles locked and the swaybars disconnected, you don't have to work nearly as hard as a driver in order to get past a given obstacle.

The other aspect I love about the V is kind of the inverse of the first point, namely how amazingly well it was designed and executed given the design parameters Honda started with.

They never set out to design a dedicated, hard core off roader. They set out to create an immensely versatile vehicle that would be as much at home as a grocery getter or commuter as it would be going camping or to a beach picnic, or just about anywhere you might like to take it. The thing is, they put so much care and attention into its design that they ended up creating something that actually is pretty dang impressive off road.

Even more interestingly, what tends to contribute most to this capability is the "intangibles" - things like the near perfect weight distribution, the excellent steering sensitivity and turning radius, the excellent approach, departure and breakover angles, the light weight, etc etc. It makes for a vehicle that often surprises the driver with its capability and is an absolute riot to drive.

Sorry, waxing poetic again lol I will say this, the V is hands down the most fun car I've ever owned, and it's gotten me into the most fun adventures, too.
 
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Enthusiast III

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One of the things I find the most fun about off roading the CR-V is the challenge. Because it doesn't have massive flex, sway bar disconnects, locking diffs, or even low range or selectable 4wd, it forces you to be a better driver. Things like line selection, throttle control and tire placement become absolutely crucial, because the machine isn't doing a huge amount to compensate for you. If you're driving a jeep Rubicon rolling around on 35's with both axles locked and the swaybars disconnected, you don't have to work nearly as hard as a driver in order to get past a given obstacle.

The other aspect I love about the V is kind of the inverse of the first point, namely how amazingly well it was designed and executed given the design parameters Honda started with.

They never set out to design a dedicated, hard core off roader. They set out to create an immensely versatile vehicle that would be as much at home as a grocery getter or commuter as it would be going camping or to a beach picnic, or just about anywhere you might like to take it. The thing is, they put so much care and attention into its design that they ended up creating something that actually is pretty dang impressive off road.

Even more interestingly, what tends to contribute most to this capability is the "intangibles" - things like the near perfect weight distribution, the excellent steering sensitivity and turning radius, the excellent approach, departure and breakover angles, the light weight, etc etc. It makes for a vehicle that often surprises the driver with its capability and is an absolute riot to drive.

Sorry, waxing poetic again lol I will say this, the V is hands down the most fun car I've ever owned, and it's gotten me into the most fun adventures, too.
ahhhh back before Honda sold out. mid 90s to 2000 were hondas best years. The first gen CR-V was awesome. the civic was awesome, my acura integra was AWESOME, the accord was awesome. etc. 2001 saw the end with the macpherson strut equiped civic. ALL soul was gone from honda and it only returned with the re introduction of the Type R civic. Which still does not hold a candle to the Integra type R. My integra had dual wishbone front and rear suspension and was a beast on a track. Mine even more so with the modded supercharger setup.
 

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ahhhh back before Honda sold out. mid 90s to 2000 were hondas best years. The first gen CR-V was awesome. the civic was awesome, my acura integra was AWESOME, the accord was awesome. etc. 2001 saw the end with the macpherson strut equiped civic. ALL soul was gone from honda and it only returned with the re introduction of the Type R civic. Which still does not hold a candle to the Integra type R. My integra had dual wishbone front and rear suspension and was a beast on a track. Mine even more so with the modded supercharger setup.
Oh that was for sure the golden age of Honda. I owned a 98 Civic hatch back stick shift and dang was that car fun to drive.
 
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Oh that was for sure the golden age of Honda. I owned a 98 Civic hatch back stick shift and dang was that car fun to drive.
I had a 91 prelude with four wheel steering, a 92 accord, a 96 civic hatch and the 2000 integra. in 2002 I traded the integra on my parents new mercedes and I took their subaru legacy. I then added a twin turbo to that...It was a blast to drive. But only after 7000 dollars worth of "warranty" bills. Before the TT was installed too, so it was not that. One good thing came out of the subaru ownership. I became good friends with the subaru warranty manager who also raced rally. I got to help build and tune the two factory subaru WRX cars for the targa Newfoundland back in the day. It was awesome, and I learned crap loads from those guys, and they learned from me too.
 
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Looks great. My son just started at Gonzaga so I expect I'm going to spend some time in that area over the next four or so years.
The CDA forest is awesome. Its well traveled by hunters so the trails are navigable by anything with 4 wheel drive and decent approach and departure angles (I think a stock height Subaru may have problems dragging its chin). However some tracks up to some peaks like above are getting over grown. So your paint work will not be spared...
 
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