Suspension help

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theMightyGoose

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So I'm getting ready for my first big 4x4 camping trip to the Eastern Sierras. I got the truck loaded with just basic camping gear and the back end is squatting more than I expected it to. What's a good way to increase the ride height with minimal modifications. But still maintain good off road capabilities. I don't need a lot of correction. Just a little.
 

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So I'm getting ready for my first big 4x4 camping trip to the Eastern Sierras. I got the truck loaded with just basic camping gear and the back end is squatting more than I expected it to. What's a good way to increase the ride height with minimal modifications. But still maintain good off road capabilities. I don't need a lot of correction. Just a little.
Before I went with a heavier new lift/spring pack and shocks I ran a set of firestone air bags and they worked great for handling extra weight. They are relatively cheap, I think they were about $250 and are infinitely adjustable for different payloads or no extra weight. They also can be adjusted independently for different weights side to side. They didn't seem to effect off-road capability on a stock truck. The only modification I had to make was cutting the rubber bump stops off with a sawzall, other than that it all bolts on over the stock stuff.


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Btw sdtrucksprings.com was the cheapest I found and shipped fast.


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Trailaholic

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So I'm getting ready for my first big 4x4 camping trip to the Eastern Sierras. I got the truck loaded with just basic camping gear and the back end is squatting more than I expected it to. What's a good way to increase the ride height with minimal modifications. But still maintain good off road capabilities. I don't need a lot of correction. Just a little.
There's ways you can "increase ride height" and ways you can "correct it".

Please please only correct it. For this you can replace or add to the leaf packs in the rear along with replacing the shocks with ones valved for the added weight.

If you were to just increase it with things such as lift blocks, you put stress into places that weren't meant to handle it along with using the same suspension meant for a lighter load.


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theMightyGoose

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I have airbags in my 4Runner and they worked well for me. I wasn't sure how well they would work on a Tacoma. I do think the added leaf spring is probably a better solution, but I really don't want to start modifying the suspension components unless necessary. I think the airbags are a good solution. It sounds like others have had good results. I only need a minor correction for temporary situations.
 

theMightyGoose

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I had a '14 Tundra and did some mild 4x4 camping trips. It never struggled to hold the weight. But it's built for a different purpose. I just expected the Tacoma to handle camping gear better.
 

000

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I had a '14 Tundra and did some mild 4x4 camping trips. It never struggled to hold the weight. But it's built for a different purpose. I just expected the Tacoma to handle camping gear better.
I had the same experience when I went from a tundra to a taco. The taco springs are surprisingly squishy. I ended up going with the old man emu Dakar pack with the extra leaf since I always have a rtt on the shell and a fridge on a slider and a heavy tool kit etc. I went with coilovers for a little lift and to compensate for the winch and the dakars matched my needs nicely. They also don't seem to notice the addition of camping gear much in addition to the usual daily load. I passed the bags on to my buddy who was annoyed with the sag from the weight of his shell and a little camping gear. he's been very happy since he has no interest in ever modifying his suspension and can easily adjust specific to his payload.


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theMightyGoose

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I had the same experience when I went from a tundra to a taco. The taco springs are surprisingly squishy. I ended up going with the old man emu Dakar pack with the extra leaf since I always have a rtt on the shell and a fridge on a slider and a heavy tool kit etc. I went with coilovers for a little lift and to compensate for the winch and the dakars matched my needs nicely. They also don't seem to notice the addition of camping gear much in addition to the usual daily load. I passed the bags on to my buddy who was annoyed with the sag from the weight of his shell and a little camping gear. he's been very happy since he has no interest in ever modifying his suspension and can easily adjust specific to his payload.


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Thanks. I think I'll start with the bags and modify if needed. But since I don't plan on building a dedicated overlanding rig, I doubt I'll need to. I like just having a capable 4x4 and hauling camping gear.
 

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Thanks. I think I'll start with the bags and modify if needed. But since I don't plan on building a dedicated overlanding rig, I doubt I'll need to. I like just having a capable 4x4 and hauling camping gear.
They are definitely plenty capable rigs stock with the exception of the rear springs if you put anything heavier than a medium sized cooler in the back. It's too bad that they didn't have something like a progressive spring pack from the factory that would haul a normal load.
 

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theick

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The add a leaf works ok for occasional small loads. The problem is that the existing springs are still weak and this places a lot of stress at the end of the AAL. If you plan to carry much camp gear often you are better off replacing with something like the progressive springs from Allpro.
 

RedRob

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I went with air bags and I’m very happy with the ability to adjust to the specific load I’m carrying. Not too expensive to do a simple version. I went with an on-board compressor and tank with remote control, but I think you can just do bags to fill with a portable inflator and add fancy stuff later if you want. I do love my on-board air.