Skottle First Cook - Issue | OVERLAND BOUND COMMUNITY

Skottle First Cook - Issue

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jmorin41

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Hi Everyone,

Over the holidays I decided to pull the trigger on the Tembo Tusk Skottle. Today was my first time using and I experienced issues. The season in the center flaked off into the food. I cooked fried rice for lunch and I could see flakes in the food and it tasted funny. After doing the clean up (like video on tembo site), I noticed that a good portion of the seasoning is gone. See pics of the aftermath...

seasoning_flaking.jpg

20210116_102019.jpg

I'm not sure where I went wrong. I used a silicon spatula and I was not rough with the pan (i.e. no hard scraping). I used some avocado oil, started on low heat to warn it up before I started cooking at a higher setting. I made sure to flip/stir the food frequently since things seemed to cook fast and some rice began to stick a bit. I'm not sure if new seasoning from future use will adhere to old or if I should just take off all the old seasoning and start over. I'd love to hear some pointers for those of you who have these or may have experienced the same.
 

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grubworm

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i dont have that piece of gear, but i have cooked with cast iron and carbon steel for many years. it looks like the center was overheated and the seasoning just delaminated and went into the food.
the metal doesnt look right in the pic you have, but its hard to tell from a pic. i would get an 80 grit flap wheel and a grinder and remove all the seasoning and go over the entire surface area really well and then season it again with peanut oil or something good with high heat.
do that and see how it works. its hard to say what is wrong because you really dont know what was done to it. might have been an inexperienced worker trying to season it and messing up somehow. just take it all back to bare metal and re-season it right and then if it messes up, you will at least have data that will help you figure out the problem.

if it is newly seasoned and you cooked with something acid, tomatoes, etc....that might be a culprit. ive seen tomato sauce jack up a newly seasoned pot
 

Things

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On mine the center cooked off, I let it heat up and wiped off the heated "oil" they say it it ready to cook but the oil seemed so pasty I wanted it cleaned off so I could start my own seasoning with olive oil.

I ended up heating it slightly and take a razor blade and scraping the rim off then wipe out the interior then oil it, all good now. Put it away with a thin coat off oil on it.

Most people just bake it in a oven then wipe it out and it gets rid of it for the most part.

Food unit.
 

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Myself I would email Tembo the pics and story, see what they say....Next grubworm nailed it, follow his advice.

Jim
 
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Things

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Curious if you were in really cold weather and it was left out. Causing it to "delaminate" before cooking. They are blanched with a sticky heavy oil that I did not care for.

I chat with Marco and Jerry all the time, just message them on instagram and I bet they would get right back to you. Or PM Jerry a message on his story.

Do not take any abrasive to it though!
 

photosubieoverland

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Interesting I had the same issue.
I got mine last December. The burner that ships with the skottle gets way to hot very fast so you have to use it at a very low setting. The first time I used it the same thing happened to me. All the seasoning in the center came right off. Would have been nice if there was something that says not to turn it up even half way.

Anyway, I tried to season it on the grill (I contacted them and they just pointed to their websites instructions), came right off again. Tried to use the oven method, Same thing.

The skottle is carbon steel. When I bought it everything I found said it was cast iron so I was treating it as such. Seasoning shouldn’t be much different, but I own several cast iron pans all non-stick. I have never been able to get the skottle seasoned. It’s not non-stick at all.

So now, I don’t even use it. Every now and then I’ll try, use plenty of oil, but as soon as you put something on it it sticks and burns. I’ve gone back to just using pans and a burner when I go camping. There easier to clean up, and takes up less space. May end up putting the skottle up for sale soon since it’s collecting dust now.
 

jmorin41

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Interesting I had the same issue.
I got mine last December. The burner that ships with the skottle gets way to hot very fast so you have to use it at a very low setting. The first time I used it the same thing happened to me. All the seasoning in the center came right off. Would have been nice if there was something that says not to turn it up even half way.

Anyway, I tried to season it on the grill (I contacted them and they just pointed to their websites instructions), came right off again. Tried to use the oven method, Same thing.

The skottle is carbon steel. When I bought it everything I found said it was cast iron so I was treating it as such. Seasoning shouldn’t be much different, but I own several cast iron pans all non-stick. I have never been able to get the skottle seasoned. It’s not non-stick at all.

So now, I don’t even use it. Every now and then I’ll try, use plenty of oil, but as soon as you put something on it it sticks and burns. I’ve gone back to just using pans and a burner when I go camping. There easier to clean up, and takes up less space. May end up putting the skottle up for sale soon since it’s collecting dust now.
It's just as you put it. I took off all the old seasoning and did 3 bakes where it looks great, then I do a cook and it all comes off even at low heat. I've repeated this now 2-3 times and it never takes. I still use it to cook and think it is what it is. I can't use it as a stand alone item. I take a separate single burner and non-stick pan for things like scramble eggs. I just use it for meat and veggie stir fry. It's a shame because for that price I had high hopes. I was better off with just my double burner Coleman.... tried and true!
 
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photosubieoverland

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It's just as you put it. I took off all the old seasoning and did 3 bakes where it looks great, then I do a cook and it all comes off even at low heat. I've repeated this now 2-3 times and it never takes. I still use it to cook and think it is what it is. I can't use it as a stand alone item. I take a separate single burner and non-stick pan for things like scramble eggs. I just use it for meat and veggie stir fry. It's a shame because for that price I had high hopes. I was better off with just my double burner Coleman.... tried and true!
I cant count the number of times I seasoned it in an oven with it looking great after just to come right off! High heat, high smoke point oil, all the correct steps. Like you said, it is what it is. I have used it on 2 camping trips since I got it, only because I was in a group and had to cook a lot of food like stir fry. When its just me or I only have to cook for one or two people, my jet boil setup has never failed, and the pans are completely non-stick. I had high hopes too, but its not as great as people make it out to be.
 

photosubieoverland

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It's just as you put it. I took off all the old seasoning and did 3 bakes where it looks great, then I do a cook and it all comes off even at low heat. I've repeated this now 2-3 times and it never takes. I still use it to cook and think it is what it is. I can't use it as a stand alone item. I take a separate single burner and non-stick pan for things like scramble eggs. I just use it for meat and veggie stir fry. It's a shame because for that price I had high hopes. I was better off with just my double burner Coleman.... tried and true!
So, after seeing this I decided to give another try at seasoning it, not following the methods on the Tembo site, but how I would my carbon/steel pans.

So obviously it’s not cast iron, and it comes with a layer of corn oil seasoned on it once (like it looks when we take it out of the oven). What I did was first removed anything that looked like it was burnt on with a steel ball and water. I then peeled a five dollar bag of potatoes, and fried them in a ton of salt and canola oil. I turned it up to a medium high (not fully opened) and added oil along the way until all the skins were crispy. I then cleaned it with just water and paper towels, added some oil and fried an egg. It stuck in one time sized spot in the middle. Which once I broke it loose it was non-stick. You can also gauge how hot it is by how fast the egg gets crispy around the edges and get a feel for how open the burner needs to be.

It sounds like you ordered yours around the same time I got mine, so the burner comes with an adapter the burns really hot. Almost to hot. We both seem to have the same issue with the seasoning to. Could have been a bad batch.

Anyway hope that helps you. If you can’t fry an egg and freely move it around do the potato and salt thing again like you would carbon steel. The instructions provided even says “like a cast iron” haha.
 

lhoffm4

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Not sure what the BTU output of the burner is, but it may be too high. I’ve had stainless steel turkey fryers that burn at 60k BTUs but most of the Camp Chef burners stick to the 30k BTU range. The higher output burners were designed to be used with large steel kettles and flame tamer shields, not aluminum stock pots or with direct to metal contact. 30k BTU burners work better for non steel contact or without flame tamers.

60kBTU will burn the seasoning off cast Iron. Carbon steel is even more finicky. It is so because it’s not porous like cast iron. If you blast carbon steel in one spot, it super heats and cools quicker, the further away from the heat it gets, vs a more even heat and slower to disperse heat that cast iron provides.

you had stated the Skottle was carbon steel. If so then a lower setting or burner only capable of 30k BTUs might help keep your seasoning from flaking off. Or you may place a diffuser plate between the burner and the disk. If you choose to make a flame tamer (brand name) diffuser yourself, either use 1/4 inch to 3/8 inch stainless about 8-10 inches in diameter and drill concentric circles of 1/4 inch holes in it, or if you choose softer steel use 3/8- 5/6 steel (so it lasts longer) and do the same.

using a diffuser will keep your skottle from super heating in the center and burning off your seasoning.

as for re-seasoning your disk, or any pre seasoned Steel or cast iron cooking surface, I’d recommend an electrolysis tank over a flapper or grinder, especially on cast iron, as it will clean the pores missed by an abrasive process. Then the oil used to reseason it will sink in and coat better and be less likely to flake off.

properly re-applying a light coat ofoil after wash use, and wiping it off thoroughly will also extend the life of your seasoning, without build up and potentially going rancid. That’s when the surface becomes sticky and smells bad. I have had great success with olive oil for my cast iron, steel pans and steel griddles.

electrolysis is very easy to DIY. There are numerous how tos on YouTube. You can also accomplish the same effect by just soaking the seasoned or painted metal in a plastic tub filled with white vinegar, but it will need to soak longer this way. Be careful to rinse and dry bare metal quickly after thes processes, as the steel may flash rust within hours of coming out of the solution. I normally rinse with clear water and a green scrubby then place the pot or griddle in an oven at 200 degreesfor 30 minutes to completely dry it out before starting the reseason process.

I know this post was long, but if you do these steps correctly, your gear will be serving generations of your family on their camping trips long after you have moved on to a higher plane of existence...
 

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It just shows that a hyped new piece of gear isn’t what it’s hyped up to be. Not surprised here.

I was thinking of getting a skottle a while ago, but when thinking about it, I realized it would be bad at nearly everything I cook. Way worse than what I can pack in a similar amount of weight and space otherwise. Happy that I didn’t get since it’s also rather overpriced.
 

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Wow, I would not have expected that for that price. It seems another example of good marketing (and the use of "influencers") but a product that isn't up to regular use. Wasn't there a burner in the package that goes with the product?
 
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cug

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The thing is: this is just a piece of simple metal, a cheap and shitty burner and a set of 3 dollar legs. The concept is the same as cast iron or carbon steel cooking, it’s just hyped by the “overland boom” and therefore they get away with cheap components at an insane price. A good dual burner stove, a stainless pot and a carbon steel or cast iron skillet are much more flexible, cheaper, easier to use and you can cook better with them. Oh, and you can use them to make coffee. This is just another solution to a made up problem.

Sorry to say, but I’ve seen one in use and it’s just not worth it. Don’t believe any of the “influencers” out there! They might not get paid for the particular product, but they make their money by giving positive exposure.
 
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MMc

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I do not know about scottie's other than they are marketed hard. I have been around Discas for years, they are the Mexican version. When they are used there is always a bit of oil in the base, 1/4 inch or so. The fire isn't like a wok fire it's a med to med+ heat. They use the edges to keep stuff warm while the cooking is do in the middle, the oil never burns .
 
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photosubieoverland

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Not sure what the BTU output of the burner is, but it may be too high. I’ve had stainless steel turkey fryers that burn at 60k BTUs but most of the Camp Chef burners stick to the 30k BTU range. The higher output burners were designed to be used with large steel kettles and flame tamer shields, not aluminum stock pots or with direct to metal contact. 30k BTU burners work better for non steel contact or without flame tamers.

60kBTU will burn the seasoning off cast Iron. Carbon steel is even more finicky. It is so because it’s not porous like cast iron. If you blast carbon steel in one spot, it super heats and cools quicker, the further away from the heat it gets, vs a more even heat and slower to disperse heat that cast iron provides.

you had stated the Skottle was carbon steel. If so then a lower setting or burner only capable of 30k BTUs might help keep your seasoning from flaking off. Or you may place a diffuser plate between the burner and the disk. If you choose to make a flame tamer (brand name) diffuser yourself, either use 1/4 inch to 3/8 inch stainless about 8-10 inches in diameter and drill concentric circles of 1/4 inch holes in it, or if you choose softer steel use 3/8- 5/6 steel (so it lasts longer) and do the same.

using a diffuser will keep your skottle from super heating in the center and burning off your seasoning.

as for re-seasoning your disk, or any pre seasoned Steel or cast iron cooking surface, I’d recommend an electrolysis tank over a flapper or grinder, especially on cast iron, as it will clean the pores missed by an abrasive process. Then the oil used to reseason it will sink in and coat better and be less likely to flake off.

properly re-applying a light coat ofoil after wash use, and wiping it off thoroughly will also extend the life of your seasoning, without build up and potentially going rancid. That’s when the surface becomes sticky and smells bad. I have had great success with olive oil for my cast iron, steel pans and steel griddles.

electrolysis is very easy to DIY. There are numerous how tos on YouTube. You can also accomplish the same effect by just soaking the seasoned or painted metal in a plastic tub filled with white vinegar, but it will need to soak longer this way. Be careful to rinse and dry bare metal quickly after thes processes, as the steel may flash rust within hours of coming out of the solution. I normally rinse with clear water and a green scrubby then place the pot or griddle in an oven at 200 degreesfor 30 minutes to completely dry it out before starting the reseason process.

I know this post was long, but if you do these steps correctly, your gear will be serving generations of your family on their camping trips long after you have moved on to a higher plane of existence...
It’s only 10,000, but because it thin steel and literally less then an inch away from the steel, it gets to hot on anything but low.
 

photosubieoverland

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The thing is: this is just a piece of simple metal, a cheap and shitty burner and a set of 3 dollar legs. The concept is the same as cast iron or carbon steel cooking, it’s just hyped by the “overland boom” and therefore they get away with cheap components at an insane price. A good dual burner stove, a stainless pot and a carbon steel or cast iron skillet are much more flexible, cheaper, easier to use and you can cook better with them. Oh, and you can use them to make coffee. This is just another solution to a made up problem.

Sorry to say, but I’ve seen one in use and it’s just not worth it. Don’t believe any of the “influencers” out there! They might not get paid for the particular product, but they make their money by giving positive exposure.
I agree. I got it as a gift, but don’t like to use it. I had reached out to them and told them all the trouble I’ve been having, apparently they use cold rolled and hot rolled steel. If you get a cold rolled version (which is what I got) the seasoning comes right off. He offered to exchange it for a hot rolled steel version which I said ok, but I have a feeling I’m going to end up selling it. If I do for some reason in the future want something like it again, I’ll get a cast iron discada instead, but I have a feeling I’m going to stick to my burner and pans/pots.
 
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cug

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but I have a feeling I’m going to stick to my burner and pans/pots
That's exactly what I'm doing.

I can do everything a skottle does with my setup, plus I can do a lot more. The only thing a skottle could replace for me is a pan. I'd still need a pot, a kettle, and possibly a griddle or so. So, I'm actually adding a much larger package for something that isn't as good at doing what I already have a tool for, since I can use my cast iron pan on various heat sources, can do larger stews with it (it has high(ish) walls), can lend it to someone and still use my own stove, and so on.

When I heard about the skottle a while ago, I was super excited about it, but it's basically a one trick pony compared to a modular cooking setup. I see many people saying "oh, you can also do this, it's not optimal, but you can do it" – but why would I want to do something not optimal, if a standard setup does it better with less space usage and less hassle?

Just think about this one:

"The history of the Skottle comes from the South African farmer and finding a secondary use for old harrow discs by turning them into an outdoor cooking utensil they could use while out in the fields."
That means, you use a skottle because
  1. You don't have traditional cooking tools with you and
  2. You re-use some other tool in an improvised way.
Why would I WANT to do that? If I'm planning beforehand, which I guess most of us here do, I can just bring what I need and be done with it.
 

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The thing is: this is just a piece of simple metal, a cheap and shitty burner and a set of 3 dollar legs. The concept is the same as cast iron or carbon steel cooking, it’s just hyped by the “overland boom” and therefore they get away with cheap components at an insane price. A good dual burner stove, a stainless pot and a carbon steel or cast iron skillet are much more flexible, cheaper, easier to use and you can cook better with them. Oh, and you can use them to make coffee. This is just another solution to a made up problem.

Sorry to say, but I’ve seen one in use and it’s just not worth it. Don’t believe any of the “influencers” out there! They might not get paid for the particular product, but they make their money by giving positive exposure.
This guy gets it!
 
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