Should i go Yota??? (Lets not be bias)

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IronPercheron

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MA_Trooper

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Oh man. Both are epic rigs. I think this one comes down to personal preference.
I love the FJ60 for its interior space. And it is extremely capable when set up well.
The bronco is equally capable, if not more capable in some aspects. If I am thinking of the right Bronco, it has a shorter wheel base. Not a ton shorter but enough to make an impact.
You have a real dilemma on your hands here. Both are classics in my book. The Bronco, to me, is a little easier to work on. I don't know, man. That's a tough one.
Is it an option to have both? I think that may be the only true resolution here ;)
 

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I love my Fords but I love those old land cruisers. I imagine it's a question of if you're satisfied with what I call "Big Brute" overlanding. Sometimes I feel like a steroided Bull on stage at a ballet recital when I'm tromping through the woods in my F-150. I can only imagine what it's like in something like the bronco in the older generation big bodies.

I don't think anything beats a bronco for its capability if you're looking for something that size. It, like the smaller land cruizer are blank canvases for what you want to do with it. That's what so great about older project vehicles, you can turn them into nearly anything you want for usually very little time or money.

Do you want to off road lighter or do you like being a heavyweight on the trail? That's probably the only logical question. (The only other thing worth considering is your money invested already vs. how much you have to put into the next project.)

I like both. I haven't built either yet but if I had to chose right now, I'd chose the Toyota for cool factor or your Bronco for current capability.
 

stoney126

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I'd say stick with the bronco And add on. Judging solely by the pics your bronco looks to be in better shape. The weight I would think should be about the same between the two. I'm not a huge fan of the TTB though. My vote stay bronco. I guess your future plans and how much weight each is allowed to carry comes into play as well.
 

IronPercheron

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I have a dana 44 from a 77 f150 im got to put under the bronco to eliminate TTB it really is hard, this is the second time i was on the gence about toyota though... they have great stuff!

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IronPercheron

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The other part - how common are parts for a 77 f150 if i chew a bearing or somethin :-/

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Lifestyle Overland

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That's a tough one... being a Toyota fan I say go 'yota. However, it looks like the rust on that FJ60 is pretty nasty. If you could find a better, rust free example for about the same price then I would be more inclined to say "jump". But in this case, you better stick with your Ford since you know it inside and out and have proven its abilities.
Even if you're just looking for a project in addition to the Ford, that's a lot of rust... you better be willing to live with it, or spend a lot of time replacing panels. Not to mention the mechanical unknowns.

Just my 2 cents worth.
 

IronPercheron

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That's a tough one... being a Toyota fan I say go 'yota. However, it looks like the rust on that FJ60 is pretty nasty. If you could find a better, rust free example for about the same price then I would be more inclined to say "jump". But in this case, you better stick with your Ford since you know it inside and out and have proven its abilities.
Even if you're just looking for a project in addition to the Ford, that's a lot of rust... you better be willing to live with it, or spend a lot of time replacing panels. Not to mention the mechanical unknowns.

Just my 2 cents worth.
I think thats what im gonna do

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IronPercheron

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Like @stringtwelve said, I would be more inclined to say go for it if the FJ60 was in better shape.
Ill saay this.... just went to dinner with my uncle in his land cruiser, 344k on the ticker... bone stock and dealer maintained.

Think i may wait on him to sell! Same as the one on expedition overland... but white. V8 and leather and all that

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toxicity_27

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Ill saay this.... just went to dinner with my uncle in his land cruiser, 344k on the ticker... bone stock and dealer maintained.

Think i may wait on him to sell! Same as the one on expedition overland... but white. V8 and leather and all that

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100 series?
 

IronPercheron

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Google is the devil... i would have a hard time justifying this... purhaps some bad rust or a tree limb making sweet surprise love to my roof.... them maybe... but dang if it dont look coooll!.uploadfromtaptalk1449889010572.png

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TreXTerra

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While I really do like Toyotas (for the most part), remember that Land Cruiser is over 30 years old.
Some things to consider when buying a rig:
  • Reliability: A newer vehicle will be more reliable than an older one in most cases, but it comes at a cost - both financially and in complexity.
  • Parts availability: Will you be able to get replacement parts of you break something? Vehicles within 10 years of their final production date are much easier to find parts for than older models. Also, if you are buying some fancy import like a Range Rover or G-Wagon, you probably won't be finding parts at the local Napa in Armpit, NoWheresville.
  • Simplicity of Field Repairs: This is where older vehicles rule. No fancy electronics to mystify you, just a hammer and a screwdriver with a little bit of baling wire and you can red-neck engineer your way back to civilization. Just remember, some things can't be bodged together and will require parts.
  • Comfort: If you feel like you've been in a tumble dryer with a Japanese Rock Garden after a day behind the wheel, your trip is going to suck and you won't want to go. Rattling panels, poor heat or A/C systems, a blown stereo, and seats with foam that has long since turned to dust all make a fun trip hell.
  • Capability and Range: Can the vehicle actually do what you are asking it to do? Will it carry you, your tribe, and all the gear without sitting on the stops? Can it make it all the way on the fuel in the tank? Is it capable of handling the terrain you want to take on?
Some of these things are a trade-off. Personally, I'm not sure I want to be in an FJ60 with leaf-springs all around for this type of trip if I can help it. Sure, the Land Cruiser is legendary, but at 30+ years old, there are bound to be problems. Even in Moab, our Land Cruiser had to sit for a week and wait for parts to be shipped in so a wheel assembly could be replaced. We ended up driving a Rent-A-Wreck back to Salt Lake and returning the following weekend to pick up the 'Cruiser. If you can't even find parts in an off road town like Moab, you really won't find anything outside the major cities.
 
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