Re-name The Jeep Cherokee And Grand Cherokee....

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bgenlvtex

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I wonder, aside from legal issue, if there could be one.....
So what if Jeep kept the name? I don't think the Jeep buying demographic would be too swayed by this issue. From a sales point, Jeep has to consider if Jeep buyers even care about cancel culture. It could be worse to give up an established brand name than offend 23 possible Jeep buyers.
They should keep the name and simply "identify" as the "Kumbaya Karrier".

There, fixed.
 

Two Sheds

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I don’t understand the complaint, things like this are name such as a sign of respect. Who wants a team/ city/state/vehicle/etc. with a name meant to insult. Why are they bothered by respect? I guess we should start renaming things to ,oh I don’t know...maybe Jeep Grand Whiney Lib. Or the Atlanta Intolerants.or even street name like Indian Hill could now be ‘Can’t cope Hill.. you get the idea
but I digress
 
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SquishBang

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They could rename it "Paradox"
For the "paradox of tolerance"!

Actually, I like the way it rolls off the tongue: Jeep Paradox
 

ABerte

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Respectfully, to just about all previous posters, this isn’t ‘cancel culture’ or PC anything. It isn’t about making everyone walking on eggshells. And it’s not about how the Jeep brand “intends” it, as some suggest it’s an honor or a show of respect. I wholeheartedly doubt it is. It’s a title meant to evoke certain ideas and feelings that Jeep wishes to associate with in order to PROFIT. If something was more profitable, they’d be using it. If something is a liability, smart business moves on from it.

It’s like all the out of area coal companies that took over West Virginia, set up shop, mined and mined and mined, sent their profits to other states, and then moved on. And now West Virginians are SOL since their resource supply is both diminished and less an asset than it used to be. But the point is that the state of WV allowed others control of their resources and they were exploited for profit. And further, it’s for those to whom the name belongs that deserve the respect of deciding how it’s used. How about we name an OB vehicle the Jeep Korean, because man, that thing likes to work?!? Or better yet, the Jeep Slave! Look at that thing plow through that field!

Free speech is one thing and individuals have the right to say most anything they want short of threats in this country. But that doesn’t mean their isn’t a cost. And that works both ways, no matter your politics. I agree we’ve wandered culturally into hypersensitivity, but on this issue I think Jeep should concede the name, it’s not theirs to do with as they please and profit from.
 
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Boostpowered

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Respectfully, to just about all previous posters, this isn’t ‘cancel culture’ or PC anything. It isn’t about making everyone walking on eggshells. And it’s not about how the Jeep brand “intends” it, as some suggest it’s an honor or a show of respect. I wholeheartedly doubt it is. It’s a title meant to evoke certain ideas and feelings that Jeep wishes to associate with in order to PROFIT. If something was more profitable, they’d be using it. If something is a liability, smart business moves on from it.

It’s like all the out of area coal companies that took over West Virginia, set up shop, mined and mined and mined, sent their profits to other states, and then moved on. And now West Virginians are SOL since their resource supply is both diminished and less an asset than it used to be. But the point is that the state of WV allowed others control of their resources and they were exploited for profit. And further, it’s for those to whom the name belongs that deserve the respect of deciding how it’s used. How about we name an OB vehicle the Jeep Korean, because man, that thing likes to work?!? Or better yet, the Jeep Slave! Look at that thing plow through that field!

Free speech is one thing and individuals have the right to say most anything they want short of threats in this country. But that doesn’t mean their isn’t a cost. And that works both ways, no matter your politics. I agree we’ve wandered culturally into hypersensitivity, but on this issue I think Jeep should concede the name, it’s not theirs to do with as they please and profit from.
Might buy your argument if you can find any full blooded native Americans that aren't inbred that take offense to the name.
Same with your slavery argument show Me an African American in chains working a field.
If you haven't noticed we are living in a woke era, apparently it doesn't matter if it's something that happened over 200 years ago which those of us today had no control over.

Your either giving woke culture to much credit or your ar part of it.

Did any whites loose their mind on st Patrick's day when every non white newscaster tried to talk like the lucky charms leprechaun? Guess what Irish were indentured servants aka slaves in the new America and stayed that way till Italians started coming here.

And while on that kick go look up the Barbary slave trade and see just how 2 sided the whole argument is.
 
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ABerte

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I'm not sure holding up St. Patrick's Day, an Irish holiday that some others have joined in on as it's gone mainstream, is the same as a multi-national corporation piggybacking on an ethnic stereotype for profit. We can circle back about two pages to the Jeep Irish argument if you want, as someone else already made that point. But Jeep Irish doesn't quite have the same ring to it, and it might also encourage drinking and driving...

Look, I get what you're saying, and I get that some see it as a sign of respect, and I'm not getting into an argument about woke culture and cancel this and PC that, that's a minefield I'm not prepared to walk in on this beautiful spring morning because we probably agree on enough points that isn't worth the time hashing out on which ones we don't; BUT, with regard to Native Americans, I just believe we owe them more respect than we give them and one means of showing that respect is by not exploiting a caricature of their heritage for profit. Simple as that.
 

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Respectfully, to just about all previous posters, this isn’t ‘cancel culture’ or PC anything. It isn’t about making everyone walking on eggshells. And it’s not about how the Jeep brand “intends” it, as some suggest it’s an honor or a show of respect. I wholeheartedly doubt it is. It’s a title meant to evoke certain ideas and feelings that Jeep wishes to associate with in order to PROFIT. If something was more profitable, they’d be using it. If something is a liability, smart business moves on from it.

It’s like all the out of area coal companies that took over West Virginia, set up shop, mined and mined and mined, sent their profits to other states, and then moved on. And now West Virginians are SOL since their resource supply is both diminished and less an asset than it used to be. But the point is that the state of WV allowed others control of their resources and they were exploited for profit. And further, it’s for those to whom the name belongs that deserve the respect of deciding how it’s used. How about we name an OB vehicle the Jeep Korean, because man, that thing likes to work?!? Or better yet, the Jeep Slave! Look at that thing plow through that field!

Free speech is one thing and individuals have the right to say most anything they want short of threats in this country. But that doesn’t mean their isn’t a cost. And that works both ways, no matter your politics. I agree we’ve wandered culturally into hypersensitivity, but on this issue I think Jeep should concede the name, it’s not theirs to do with as they please and profit from.
As far as I can find, Jeep went to the cherokee first nations when they wanted to use it in the beginning and got their full blessing.
 
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ABerte

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As far as I can find, Jeep went to the cherokee first nations when they wanted to use it in the beginning and got their full blessing.
Okay, and now they're asking Jeep to stop using it. If Jeep's position is that they respect the tribe enough to have asked permission in the first place, or even that Jeep believed they required the tribe's permission, there's no reason that the same respect or deference can't be shown now as it's at the tribe's discretion that their name is used at all.
 

bgenlvtex

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Okay, and now they're asking Jeep to stop using it. If Jeep's position is that they respect the tribe enough to have asked permission in the first place, or even that Jeep believed they required the tribe's permission, there's no reason that the same respect or deference can't be shown now as it's at the tribe's discretion that their name is used at all.
LOL, wouldn't that make them Indian givers?

Nobody, nobody buys a Cherokee because the name evokes anything. It's a product name, the product either delivers and sells or it doesn't.

This is very much cancel culture and a slippery slope. Unless the Native Americans are going to abandon all culture outside their own, like modern medicine, automotive technology, digital services, cosmetics, casinos, and I can go on forever they have no gripe.

This is a money grab, pure parasitism and nothing more and is not transparent only to those wishing for it to be so.
 

ABerte

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Okay, and now they're asking Jeep to stop using it. If Jeep's position is that they respect the tribe enough to have asked permission in the first place, or even that Jeep believed they required the tribe's permission, there's no reason that the same respect or deference can't be shown now as it's at the tribe's discretion that their name is used at all.
LOL, wouldn't that make them Indian givers?

Nobody, nobody buys a Cherokee because the name evokes anything. It's a product name, the product either delivers and sells or it doesn't.

This is very much cancel culture and a slippery slope. Unless the Native Americans are going to abandon all culture outside their own, like modern medicine, automotive technology, digital services, cosmetics, casinos, and I can go on forever they have no gripe.

This is a money grab, pure parasitism and nothing more and is not transparent only to those wishing for it to be so.
It’s another misfortune that the term is Indian giver when it should actually be American giver. The psychological concept is called projective identification. 45 used it to great effect. He wasn’t the first and he won’t be the last.