My Recovery Gear Tool Box

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Low Brau

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http://lowbraudc.com/recovery-gear-tool-box/

I have a few tools that I carry now, as well as some survival gear, and winch items. I'm in the process of building a drawer box, but wanted to have a tool box to help move items from truck to trail, and group together. I think it will evolve over time. Lowes had a pretty nice one for not too much, so the link above lists some of the items I'm currently storing in there.

Thoughts on what I have and any recommendations?
 

VCeXpedition

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That's a great start, should keep you out of serious trouble in most cases. Some of my thoughts would be that you want more d-shackles than you think you do, at least a half dozen because you use those a lot in most recoveries. One thing that I would say for sure is to strap that box down so it won't bounce around on rough roads, or heaven forbid you flop or roll. Also, I prefer a couple soft bags rather than one box that holds everything. Last thought would be put it where you can get to it easily. Drawers are popular but usually a bad place to put things you need if you are in a bad position - like stuck. If you have to open a hatch and then roll out a long drawer, you may have to rely on others gear to get you out. I keep my stuff within reach of the drivers seat if I think I'm gonna need it. Good luck, you've got a good start, get out and have fun using it.
Dan


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mmnorthdirections

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In mine I have included all you've listed and added Zip ties, Duck tape, electrical tape, Ratchet straps and a 12 volt hot and ground test light. Also chem lights and a gore Tex parka. Plus two multi use fire extinguishers, B-C and A-B-C. And a vehicle dedicated rechargeable flashlight.
I have used most if not all items listed, not fun but being prepared was very rewarding......
 

maktruk

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You have a winch remote. If you have a winch you need multiple d-rings, and at least two, preferably four snatch blocks. Reversing your direction of pull can be a lifesaver in recovery situations. Also if the winch fails a 12k pound comealong can almost do as much. Sometimes both working in unison, as well. Just lots more options.
 
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Desert Runner

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You have a winch remote. If you have a winch you need multiple d-rings, and at least two, preferably four snatch blocks. Reversing your direction of pull can be a lifesaver in recovery situations. Also if the winch fails a 12k pound come-along can almost do as much. Sometimes both working in unison, as well. Just lots more options.
A new You-Tube video by......Micheal of 'seek adventure'......is out about winch dampers...very interesting.
4x4 Winch Dampeners | Do They Work?.................
He also has one on shackles.......Bow & the new soft types.
4x4 Soft Shackles vs Bow (Steel) Shackles



Ronnie Dahl (Australia) also put one out a few months ago about winch cable breakage, and the damage that can happen. Both of these video's should be mandatory to those using a winch. They very much reinforce the idea of RESPECT when using recovery gear!
Mass Damage snapping winch Cables


Me: 1 damper, a 2nd on my list
6 bow shackles, 2 snatch blocks
My straps are all rated from 30,000-45,000 pound size. I needed a 2.5 safety factor. I feel much safer using that, then the accepted 1.5 safety standard.
 
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