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greddy raptor

Rank I
Expedition

Contributor III

154
Bakersfield, California, United States
First Name
Singh
Last Name
Chhina
So to start off I’m 17. I’m fortunate enough to be brought up in a home where I’m provided with educational opportunities and the ability to enjoy my childhood. I’ve always been a hands on kid and always was outside. I’ve always wanted to travel solo and I figured why not travel my fair share while I’m young. This summer before leaving to college. I want to explore what California has to offer. My platform of choice is a 2017 ford raptor. It currently is outfitted with a road shower and maxtraxx but will soon have a ikamper mini. I love cooking and I do have a fire disk for all my food needs. Aside from these item what else should I take? Any recommendations as to where I should go to build my skills? Any tips on what to avoid? How I can be safe by myself? Also where and how can i make this the best summer?!
 
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M Rose

US Northwest Region Director
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Expedition

Advocate III

5,584
La Grande, Oregon, USA
First Name
Michael
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Rose
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Service Branch
US ARMY Retired
So to start off I’m 17. I’m fortunate enough to be brought up in a home where I’m provided with educational opportunities and the ability to enjoy my childhood. I’ve always been a hands on kid and always was outside. I’ve always wanted to travel solo and I figured why not travel my fair share while I’m young. This summer before leaving to college. I want to explore what California has to offer. My platform of choice is a 2017 ford raptor. It currently is outfitted with a road shower and maxtraxx but will soon have a ikamper mini. I love cooking and I do have a fire disk for all my food needs. Aside from these item what else should I take? Any recommendations as to where I should go to build my skills? Any tips on what to avoid? How I can be safe by myself? Also where and how can i make this the best summer?!
I started solo just about your age with just a Colman stove, lantern, tarp, sleeping bag, and a compass for gear. My rig was a 1960 Willys Wagon, or a 1985 Bronco II depending on where I was heading.
I spent 3 summers traveling the back roads of Oregon and Idaho with only this gear and this setup served me well.

For planning my adventures I mixed in things I like to do besides explore. I would research hard to reach fishing locations, epic hiking trails, or must see destinations off the beaten path.

California has much to offer. Kings Canyon is one of my favorite places to visit. Then you have the Rubicon Trail, Mojave Desert, Redwoods, and many other places. There are many trails on the OB1 Map that subscribers can view and Expedition Tier can download and navigate.

You are on the right track with what you already have.
 

smritte

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Member III

2,827
Ontario California
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Step 1. Ask questions!
There ya go. What you need most of all is finding out where you can and most importantly cant camp. Then there's fire permits and fire restrictions. Example; you can have a fire in Ocotillo Wells but next door in Anza Borrego it needs to be in a container. Mountain restrictions could mean your cold camping. Too close to water may mean mosquito bites or a healthy fine. "I didn't know" still gets you in trouble.
Going out with others can be a mixed bag. Asking questions tells me your at least being responsible.
If you come south a bit, we have a good group and go out regularly. Go out and have fun.
 

Damolokai

Rank II
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Expedition

Enthusiast I

404
Houston
First Name
Joe
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Quinto
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41489

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USMC
Here's my take. Just go. You'll figure everything out. You'll never be fully prepared. Nor fully equipped for everything. The experience is more important than the gear. You might have to eat cold soup from a can, wipe your butt on a rock, or change a flat tire; but that's all good for you to experience. Mistakes and problems are just more valuable than a flawless jaunt and make for great stories to tell. Learn to turn pain into a strength. Just pick a direction and go. Accept it. You're going to screw up, and no one really cares. You'll laugh all about this later when you get older.

That's my 2 cents. We look forward to hearing the next chapter of your story.
 

Michael

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Humboldt County, California, United States
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I agree with Joe! Take the necessary precautions - for example, if you are going off grid - its a good idea to have sat comms, BUT I didn't have sat comms when I was a kid soooo. What I did do was tell folks where I was going and when I expected to be back. Take plenty of water.

You don't need all the gear, but more gear is required in extreme climates. That's pretty common sense. If alone, err on the side of caution - don't go extreme - things can go bad quickly.

I guarantee if you take a road trip between high school and college you will create some of the best memories your life. You'll never forget them.

Take this community with you! Get the Overland Bound One app and you will have tremendous support. Message Members from the Member tab of the map - ask questions as you go, and download maps for offline use. Not to mention thousands of places to check out on the map.

I upgraded your account to "Expedition" so you have access to all the features. Please enjoy your trip!

M
 

Longshot270

Rank V
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Experimenter I

1,453
DFW, TX
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Colby
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M
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I went straight from high school into college and busted as to get a 5 year degree done in 3.5. I’ve had more fun being done with it all.

While you are out and about, read historical markers, pay attention to the geology and wildlife, take lots of pictures, even of things that don’t seem super important or noteworthy. I’ve got pictures of the ground when it clicked by accident that got used as presentation backgrounds.
 

grubworm

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Member III

2,358
Thibodaux, LA, USA
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grub
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worm
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17464

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totally love what youre doing and how youre doing it! and you are spot on realizing that safety is important.
i went in the navy at 17 and after bootcamp, drove from san diego to groton, ct. i had a pontiac sunbird and i'd sleep in it at rest areas and spent most of my time driving across the country taking in the sights. i had zero camp gear, but had an amazing time and learned a lot, so gear really isnt that big a deal. i remember curling up in the floorboard and resting my head on the seat to sleep. im sure my neck hurt, but nearly 40 yrs later and all i remember is the cool stuff i saw and how good it felt doing it on my own at such a young age. it definitely gave me confidence for later in life...

the best advice i could give would be to always pay attention. be alert to whats going on around you. if youre driving, check your mirrors and look at gauges and pay attention to sounds and smells. a lot of people just hop in a vehicle and crank up the tunes and go...a wheel could be falling off and they'd never know until the car ends up in the ditch. a lot of vehicle problems give warning signs prior to catastrophic failure, so paying attention can solve 90% of problems. also pay attention to people and surroundings. if you are in a area by yourself and you get a weird gut feeling...pay attention to it and leave. i used to go overseas at a very young age and ended up by myself at times. i always paid attention and blended in. other guys would be out and about in a bad area wearing expensive shoes and jewelery and would get beat and robbed. gotta think ahead

its actually a good habit you will just perfect over time. i get gas and while im pumping, i look at my tires and just give the vehicle a once over. maybe i see a wire loose under the vehicle or a piece of trim about to come lose. i say this is the most important skill to have because no matter how much gear you carry or how many tools you have, if you arent paying attention, you will definitely have problems. just think ahead. my sons are in college and barely older than you. i have seen some of their buddies just jump into a muddy creek without even thinking that maybe there is a submerged tree with a branch that will impale them, or whatever. scares me to death knowing people will just blindly do things. kind of like vehicles driving off into a large mud puddle. it could be 1 foot deep or 10. if you dont know, maybe just avoid it or at least take a stick and walk it out before driving into it. not taking unnecessary risk also falls into that...

sounds like you are going to have a great time and experience some great stuff!
best wishes
 

9Mike2

Rank V
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Member III

2,741
Garden Grove, California
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2706

Along the lines of paying attention, I had a call out for a broke down Duce and half,. The guy said the engine quit, it sure did... I drove up to where he broke down and saw an oil streak for a half a mile all the way to the truck and an oil pool under it. He said it was making a noise so he turned up the radio ! He put a connecting rod sideways through the block of the engine....
 
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smritte

Rank V
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Member III

2,827
Ontario California
First Name
Scott
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8846

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KO6BI
Never fail to stop in the local Ranger Station or Fire House and check in a get the currant rules and regs for the areas you go....
And Maps.
I always stop in and get not just the motor vehicle/OHV use map but the big coated one.
 
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