Good Starter Book with Trail Rating / Descriptions? | OVERLAND BOUND COMMUNITY

Good Starter Book with Trail Rating / Descriptions?

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Nickel

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San Diego, CA, USA
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Steve
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Jones
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Hi All,

New member here from San Diego area. I am very new to offroading, live a fairly busy lifestyle, and am looking for a way to find easy, beginner trails that I can do solo. I know that isn't the smartest thing so I stress the "easy" part. I have a Tacoma DCLB Offroad 4x4, stock except for the rock sliders.

Was looking at a guide book today for the 100 best offroading trails in California. Even the easy trails had in the description things like "Gets a little steep and rocky at mile 6.0, 4x4 and high clearance recommended". To a newbie I don't know how to interpret "high clearance" recommended on an easy trail. Is a stock Tacoma consider high clearance? I also know with a DCLB, my breakover angle is a concern.

Does the forum have any good/solid starter books to use as a resource when looking for trails? How does one interpret the "high clearance" disclaimers even on an easy trail?
 
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M Rose

US Northwest Region Director
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La Grande, Oregon, USA
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Hi All,

New member here from San Diego area. I am very new to offroading, live a fairly busy lifestyle, and am looking for a way to find easy, beginner trails that I can do solo. I know that isn't the smartest thing so I stress the "easy" part. I have a Tacoma DCLB Offroad 4x4, stock except for the rock sliders.

Was looking at a guide book today for the 100 best offroading trails in California. Even the easy trails had in the description things like "Gets a little steep and rocky at mile 6.0, 4x4 and high clearance recommended". To a newbie I don't know how to interpret "high clearance" recommended on an easy trail. Is a stock Tacoma consider high clearance? I also know with a DCLB, my breakover angle is a concern.

Does the forum have any good/solid starter books to use as a resource when looking for trails? How does one interpret the "high clearance" disclaimers even on an easy trail?
Start off on forest service and BLM roads. As you get comfortable with the main roads, start exploring the lesser used roads… as you gain experience, you will know what your rig can and can’t do… but the biggest tip I can give… Find Someone willing to take you on a trip.

For reading… grab a Peterson’s 4 Wheel Drive and Off-road Magazine (or any of the other many off road mags) and read the trip articles. The stock Tocoma is very capable… I take our stock 2004 4Runner over quite a few trails labels as “4wheel Drive High Clearance” roads. These are typically to keep passenger cars from bottoming out.
 
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KAIONE

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Camas
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Great question @Nickel, I just started and have a new 4Runner stock with sliders too. Lol. I’m in SW Washington.

@M Rose great answer, thank you as well. Will look into that book as well!

Anyone else out there?

Thanks again you two, much appreciated.
 

bubbadangelo

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Great question @Nickel, I just started and have a new 4Runner stock with sliders too. Lol. I’m in SW Washington.

@M Rose great answer, thank you as well. Will look into that book as well!

Anyone else out there?

Thanks again you two, much appreciated.
Hey there! I am in SW Washington also. I am new to the area. Do you have any trails that you would recommend possibly with some spots for camping?
 

KAIONE

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Great question @Nickel, I just started and have a new 4Runner stock with sliders too. Lol. I’m in SW Washington.

@M Rose great answer, thank you as well. Will look into that book as well!

Anyone else out there?

Thanks again you two, much appreciated.
Hey there! I am in SW Washington also. I am new to the area. Do you have any trails that you would recommend possibly with some spots for camping?
Hey @bubbadangelo, I haven’t camped at anything around SW Wash, mostly central OR. I have been venturing out into the Washougal area mostly. Dugan Falls has a nice camp ground and there’s a few other spots above & along the Washougal River that I’ve seen. Also some nice ones heading in Skamania county by Stevenson, Willard heading N towards Packwood and the Gifford Pinchot NF. If you’d like to get together or head out on a trail for a day let me know! I just had a great ride with our Portland group as well. Lots of great info there. Let me know
 

M Rose

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Hey there! I am in SW Washington also. I am new to the area. Do you have any trails that you would recommend possibly with some spots for camping?
Get in touch with @jcgraves3 he is probably your closest member representative. John has a monthly meetup in Portland area, and takes the guys out on trips at least once a month.
 

OTH Overland

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Lots of great forest service roads to explore, sadly more and more are getting gated off due to illegal dumping and damage. You can get a motor vehicle use map (MVUM) from your local ranger station or download a pdf online. This will let you know which forest service roads are open and legal for travel. Not usually too hard to find a clearing or other place to camp. DNR lands are also a great place for dispersed camping. Online mapping apps such as Gaia give you access to digital maps for forest service, DNR, state and public lands as well as many others and help with route planning and knowing which roads and trails are open for travel.
 
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socal66

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That book and similar are good resources for identifying potential trails to run but many of those books were written in the 90’s and don’t necessarily have updates to reflect how those trails have changed since. On-line resources such as www.trailsoffroad.com would provide a more up to date view as to trail conditions and difficulty. Both trailsoffroad and notarubicon provide some good YouTube videos on most of the popular trails in Southern California and will show you exactly what to expect on those trails.
 
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Nickel

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San Diego, CA, USA
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That book and similar are good resources for identifying potential trails to run but many of those books were written in the 90’s and don’t necessarily have updates to reflect how those trails have changed since. On-line resources such as www.trailsoffroad.com would provide a more up to date view as to trail conditions and difficulty. Both trailsoffroad and notarubicon provide some good YouTube videos on most of the popular trails in Southern California and will show you exactly what to expect on those trails.
I did my first "easy" offroading last weekend in Big Bear and used a free account of trailsoffroad.com as the main resource for my research before slecting my route. It was accurate and I am considering upgrading to the full version.