Full-time overlanding - to tow or not to tow

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Get Out GO

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I do lots of extended trips but we're considering going full-time overlanding (my wife and I). I'd like to get some first-hand feedback from current full-timers on their experiences with towing (off-road trailer) vs. rig-only.
I currently have a Toyota Fortuner (similar to a 4Runner), fully kitted for overlanding and a Conqueror Companion UEV-440 off-road trailer. My other option is to start over with a rig-only config; a LC78 Troopy with an AluCab Hercules (pop-top) conversion.

Here are some of my thoughts but I'm keen to get some first-hand experience please;

Current setup
Pros

- Base camp; if we're camping in one spot for an extended period of time, we can leave the trailer set up and go exploring with the vehicle. If we're doing one-nighters the trailer does have a minimal config as well (15min) I also have an iKamper mini as an alternative.
- Interior living space; the trailer provides an interior living space which I think is a must-have for full-time in bad weather. It has a 270 awning outside as well.
- More space; between the vehicle and the trailer there is a good amount of space.
- Cost; I already own this setup, no debt.
- Fuel-economy, my current rig gives around 23.52 mpg and 18.82 towing
- Daily driver; the Fortuner is a much more modern and comfortable drive (I've owned a Troopy before)

Cons
- Maintenance cost; Another vehicle (trailer) to service
- Complexity; more things to go wrong on 2 vehicles
- Off-road capability; although this trailer is great off-road, it's still more limited in where it can go as opposed to a rig-only setup. Do still have the vehicle with an RTT so could leave the trailer and go vehicle-only on rough trips.

Land Cruiser Troopy
Pros

- Simplicity and maintenance cost; one vehicle to service
- Quick setup
- Mobility; better off-road capability
- Interior living space; albeit smaller than the trailer, it still has an interior living space

Cons
- Base camp; you have to pack up everyday to go explore (albeit the setup time is very quick)
- Cost; new vehicle and fit-out around $70k (and I'll probably get around $30k for my current setup if I sell it)
- Fuel economy; Troopy (1HZ motor) gives around 14.11 mpg
- Not as comfortable to drive as the Fortuner.

Cheers,
Christoff
 
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El-Dracho

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Hi Christoff,

First of all congrats to your decision to consider going full-time overlanding!

You've really worked out a lot of pros and cons already! This is a great list! I would - if we talk about full-time overlanding - in addition consider costs for shipping and ferries. Those are obviously higher with a trailer rig than a solo vehicle.

And another thought I always like to pass on when someone is thinking about buying a new overlanding vehicle even though they already have one. You probably already know your current vehicle and set-up very well. You know how it works, what to do if something is defective and the like. With a new vehicle, you have to adjust and learn (completely) new.

I think a lot of experiences will come together here. On their basis in combination with what you already know and have experienced, you can form your own opinion and make your own personal decision! I am very excited about what still come here for thoughts!

By the way - what is actually your plan, where do you want to travel first?

Cheers, Björn
 
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Get Out GO

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Thanks Björn, forgot about shipping!

We'd like to circumnavigate South Africa (mostly on dirt) first, then Southern Africa (Nam, Bot, Zim, Zam, Moz) and maybe even a Cape to Kairo (or abouts) trip. From there who knows...

Hi Christoff,

First of all congrats to your decision to consider going full-time overlanding!

You've really worked out a lot of pros and cons already! This is a great list! I would - if we talk about full-time overlanding - in addition consider costs for shipping and ferries. Those are obviously higher with a trailer rig than a solo vehicle.

And another thought I always like to pass on when someone is thinking about buying a new overlanding vehicle even though they already have one. You probably already know your current vehicle and set-up very well. You know how it works, what to do if something is defective and the like. With a new vehicle, you have to adjust and learn (completely) new.

I think a lot of experiences will come together here. On their basis in combination with what you already know and have experienced, you can form your own opinion and make your own personal decision! I am very excited about what still come here for thoughts!

By the way - what is actually your plan, where do you want to travel first?

Cheers, Björn
 
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4x4tripping

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We had to look a bit different at your current setup. You did list the offroad capability under "cons"

This is true during towing your trailer, is wrong when you are travelling without, using it as basecamp somewhere.

We travellers are all fighting the overweight. Mostly our very capable 4x4 arent that offroad prepared anymore, when we are ready for starting a extended multi coutry journey.

At example on such a case like showed on the picture with a bit wet meadow. Your stock and fortuner near empty is able to climb easily without a trailer. A fully loaded LC78 Troopy with (at least) 3.5 tons dont will be able to reach the top.



I did evaluate too a trailer in front of my transafrica, but there the required "have to" offroad capability (west route) and also the handling during city driving was a dislike. It is not easy to find a save spot for the trailer, when you want to restocking food in a city center as example.

Shipping is not that more expensive, to get a small or bigger container. But you cant use containersharing, something who can save a lot. For ferrys it will be more expensive..


tripping
 
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MMc

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Everything is a trade off. I am leaning towards a truck with a slide in pop-top. It will make it very tippy however. There are so many options to chose.
 
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Road

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I do lots of extended trips but we're considering going full-time overlanding (my wife and I). I'd like to get some first-hand feedback from current full-timers on their experiences with towing (off-road trailer) vs. rig-only.
I currently have a Toyota Fortuner (similar to a 4Runner), fully kitted for overlanding and a Conqueror Companion UEV-440 off-road trailer. My other option is to start over with a rig-only config; a LC78 Troopy with an AluCab Hercules (pop-top) conversion.

Here are some of my thoughts but I'm keen to get some first-hand experience please;

Current setup
Pros

- Base camp; if we're camping in one spot for an extended period of time, we can leave the trailer set up and go exploring with the vehicle. If we're doing one-nighters the trailer does have a minimal config as well (15min) I also have an iKamper mini as an alternative.
- Interior living space; the trailer provides an interior living space which I think is a must-have for full-time in bad weather. It has a 270 awning outside as well.
- More space; between the vehicle and the trailer there is a good amount of space.
- Cost; I already own this setup, no debt.
- Fuel-economy, my current rig gives around 23.52 mpg and 18.82 towing
- Daily driver; the Fortuner is a much more modern and comfortable drive (I've owned a Troopy before)

Cons
- Maintenance cost; Another vehicle (trailer) to service
- Complexity; more things to go wrong on 2 vehicles
- Off-road capability; although this trailer is great off-road, it's still more limited in where it can go as opposed to a rig-only setup. Do still have the vehicle with an RTT so could leave the trailer and go vehicle-only on rough trips.

Land Cruiser Troopy
Pros

- Simplicity and maintenance cost; one vehicle to service
- Quick setup
- Mobility; better off-road capability
- Interior living space; albeit smaller than the trailer, it still has an interior living space

Cons
- Base camp; you have to pack up everyday to go explore (albeit the setup time is very quick)
- Cost; new vehicle and fit-out around $70k (and I'll probably get around $30k for my current setup if I sell it)
- Fuel economy; Troopy (1HZ motor) gives around 14.11 mpg
- Not as comfortable to drive as the Fortuner.

Cheers,
Christoff
.
It's a struggle, isn't it Christoff, to choose one over the other.

You've got a great handle on the pros and cons, based on years of experience, sounds like. That's a well-thought out list; all things I consider regularly.

Before the pandemic, I regularly stayed out eight and ten months at a time around North America, usually off-grid and away, towing my XVenture XV-2 into remote places with my diesel van. I am in prep now to get back out there full-time and am mulling over all the same things, so very interesting to see your post and replies.

I tend to base camp much more than move nightly, often staying for a couple weeks or a month in a spot I'm enjoying. I get out and explore/research an area's flora, fauna, local history and people, and night skies in depth. So, I love having my trailer set up. It's a treat to come back to after exploring with my bike, canoe, or van and have camp already set up and ready to use. Just like coming home, but outdoors and in different places regularly.

It's the primary reason I chose the different elements in my current configuration. That and wanting to be able to use my base camps as central hub for leading workshops or hosting others.

bibelc-190308--1517.JPG
A treat to come back to when out exploring for the day.

When I do move nightly, it's still convenient as hell to have a trailer, with the number of options I have for setting up full or not. Oftentimes it's just popping the tent, without even raising the rack. My awning and RTT are both easy and quick to deploy and pack back up.

It would be a huge adjustment, in my style of travel and camping to have only my vehicle for long-term adventure. The amount of gear kept and used; packing up more often just to run for supplies; and having a more confined space in which to relax and unwind; all facts more important if traveling with a partner.

Not to mention keeping a good spot occupied when shorter term adventurers wander out to where I am, even if only camped 1-2 nights but out exploring with my van.

Towing: Your Conqueror UEV-440 has a bit higher GVM than my XV-2, and can vary depending on config, looks like. Mine has a curb weight of 510kg and a max of 1600kg loaded, and tows easily with my 6.6 diesel, whether big road or back country. I wonder if that might be a consideration as well, and how easy or not your Toyota Fortuner tows it. No idea what engine you have, though towing more weight with a smaller engine will wear more and cause more repairs over time, I would imagine.

My mileage drops around 4mpg towing it fully loaded, so about the same difference as you get.

Another big consideration for me, is that I chose to get the trailer I did so I can use it for other projects, even while traveling. It's design allows a full pickup-sized but empty cargo area while still being able to use the RTT, water, electric, and cooking area. I sometimes find work when traveling, and like that I can haul sheet goods and other building materials or cargo. I keep my van interior arrangement flexible, too, for the same reason. That would be harder to do if I only had the vehicle, as I'd build in more permanent storage.

Also easier to use my trailer for shelter if my vehicle is in the shop for whatever reason. When I've had only a vehicle, and it had to go in for u-joints years ago, I was forced to get a hotel for a few nights.

Cost of switching: That would be a huge difference for me, if I were deciding to go with an entirely different vehicle. I'd stick with my van and its more expansive interior and possibilities. I'm seriously considering building a pop-top for it now, to expand its use as both solo and tow vehicle, and to expand potential for grab-n-run exploration away from the trailer, whether setup or parked.

Sounds like you're well on your way to deciding, and it'll be interesting to see what you end up choosing.

You might like to look at @Polaris Overland and their history of extended travel. They've now moved to a larger vehicle after years of using what they had. Perhaps he will chime in here.

..

canoeloaded-900.jpeg
I've grown used to having more gear and more options in setting up camp, whether one or two nighters or weeks long basecamps.
 
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Get Out GO

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The struggle is real :laughing:

We usually base camp as well, one of the main reasons I got the trailer in the first place. There are a few places recently where we've done quite a few one-nighters and where I wouldn't take a trailer (notably crossing the Central Kalahari). My car is set up for self-sufficiency when I need it as well, just doesn't have a large interior living space obviously.

Keeping a good spot occupied is a good reason as well! With car-only camping I usually have to leave a table or something behind indicating that someone's camping there.

Towing; the trailer's curb weight is 990kg and GVM is 1500kg. It's fairly heavy (when fully loaded with water etc). The Fortuner only has a 3.0 turbo diesel but I don't struggle towing it. The Fortuner is cheap to maintain at least (same parts as a hilux and there a tons of those around). Having a trailer though does mean additional maintenance for it though (tyres, wheel bearings, breaks, shocks etc).

My trailer is more like an RV so very specific use, can't lug other stuff around with it unfortunately.

Have thought about the vehicle going into the shop as well, all your stuff's going with and you can't secure all of it and yes, you'd have to get an airbnb / hotel if the service is multi-day.

Will report back once I've decided, not in a rush fortunately

Thanks for your detailed input!

IMG_6398.JPG IMG_5735.JPG
IMG_7610_tao.JPG IMG_5671.JPG


.
It's a struggle, isn't it Christoff, to choose one over the other.

You've got a great handle on the pros and cons, based on years of experience, sounds like. That's a well-thought out list; all things I consider regularly.

Before the pandemic, I regularly stayed out eight and ten months at a time around North America, usually off-grid and away, towing my XVenture XV-2 into remote places with my diesel van. I am in prep now to get back out there full-time and am mulling over all the same things, so very interesting to see your post and replies.

I tend to base camp much more than move nightly, often staying for a couple weeks or a month in a spot I'm enjoying. I get out and explore/research an area's flora, fauna, local history and people, and night skies in depth. So, I love having my trailer set up. It's a treat to come back to after exploring with my bike, canoe, or van and have camp already set up and ready to use. Just like coming home, but outdoors and in different places regularly.

It's the primary reason I chose the different elements in my current configuration. That and wanting to be able to use my base camps as central hub for leading workshops or hosting others.


A treat to come back to when out exploring for the day.

When I do move nightly, it's still convenient as hell to have a trailer, with the number of options I have for setting up full or not. Oftentimes it's just popping the tent, without even raising the rack. My awning and RTT are both easy and quick to deploy and pack back up.

It would be a huge adjustment, in my style of travel and camping to have only my vehicle for long-term adventure. The amount of gear kept and used; packing up more often just to run for supplies; and having a more confined space in which to relax and unwind; all facts more important if traveling with a partner.

Not to mention keeping a good spot occupied when shorter term adventurers wander out to where I am, even if only camped 1-2 nights but out exploring with my van.

Towing: Your Conqueror UEV-440 has a bit higher GVM than my XV-2, and can vary depending on config, looks like. Mine has a curb weight of 510kg and a max of 1600kg loaded, and tows easily with my 6.6 diesel, whether big road or back country. I wonder if that might be a consideration as well, and how easy or not your Toyota Fortuner tows it. No idea what engine you have, though towing more weight with a smaller engine will wear more and cause more repairs over time, I would imagine.

My mileage drops around 4mpg towing it fully loaded, so about the same difference as you get.

Another big consideration for me, is that I chose to get the trailer I did so I can use it for other projects, even while traveling. It's design allows a full pickup-sized but empty cargo area while still being able to use the RTT, water, electric, and cooking area. I sometimes find work when traveling, and like that I can haul sheet goods and other building materials or cargo. I keep my van interior arrangement flexible, too, for the same reason. That would be harder to do if I only had the vehicle, as I'd build in more permanent storage.

Also easier to use my trailer for shelter if my vehicle is in the shop for whatever reason. When I've had only a vehicle, and it had to go in for u-joints years ago, I was forced to get a hotel for a few nights.

Cost of switching: That would be a huge difference for me, if I were deciding to go with an entirely different vehicle. I'd stick with my van and its more expansive interior and possibilities. I'm seriously considering building a pop-top for it now, to expand its use as both solo and tow vehicle, and to expand potential for grab-n-run exploration away from the trailer, whether setup or parked.

Sounds like you're well on your way to deciding, and it'll be interesting to see what you end up choosing.

You might like to look at @Polaris Overland and their history of extended travel. They've now moved to a larger vehicle after years of using what they had. Perhaps he will chime in here.

..


I've grown used to having more gear and more options in setting up camp, whether one or two nighters or weeks long basecamps.
 
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Road

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Excellent feedback, Christoff; much appreciated. I love the back-n-forth that can happen--too rarely oftentimes on most adventure forums--between long-term explorers.

It's another struggle, though not serious, in finding others who do the same type of wandering I most enjoy; long term travel with extended base camps across continents, with no definite itinerary other than to explore and experience the people, places, and things one might experience.

It sounds like that's what you enjoy, as well.

I love your images and the terrain and expanse you have close at hand.

It's been interesting to read lately that folks from other continents think of of the USA as prime 'overlanding' and somewhat exotic territory. Mostly, I suspect, because of the expanse of the American southwest. I imagine Africa, especially the South African areas of Nam, Bot, Zim, Zam, and Moz, as you mention, and the vast expanses of the Outback of Australia to be far superior for expeditions of the kind I'd truly love to have, but I have no firsthand experience to confirm.

The grass is always greener on the other side of the fence.

I often think of my adventures here in North America as preparation for those other places. I regularly experiment and plan with how self-sufficient and independent I can be as far as necessary needs, like my own power, repair and recovery tools, and capabilities for carrying my own food and water with those places in mind. I think "How would I fare in the back country of So Africa or Australia, where so much of my gear comes from?"

For me, and I suspect for you, it's a fun, interesting, and often life-changing challenge to imagine oneself in foreign territory, dealing with the inevitable obstacles of travel.

I know I am SO much happier and fit when out exploring and engaging with the world at large--even if alone for weeks and months at a time--than I am when staying in one place. I am much more content and satisfied with who I am in the world, and of my own capabilities to be present for others, when I am out and about and on the road.

Should I ever be in your part of the world, or you in mine, let's have a few beers or coffee and toast to exploration!

'Til then, wishing you dry roads and open skies,

~ Road

*bbnp-190223-mtns-horizon-0800.jpg

..

bibeLC-190308-panocrop-1000-1538.jpg
..

lmbbrsp-190322-1080pncrp-3350.jpg
 
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Mud & Dust

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Hey Christoff,
As a full-time overlander (on pause due to Covid), I went through the same considerations.

Your analysis seems pretty good and thorough though there are a few missing notes:
1. Will you change camp every day? In this case, I would go with the Troopy. Or will you spend 4 or 5 nights at the same camp? I would then consider the trailer. As you know, I have zero trailer experience. So my expertise is limited to my LC79 experience and other similar vehicles.
2. You don't mention the reliability of a Troopy vs a Fortuner. If a Fortuner is basically the SUV version of a Hilux, it is quite reliable but not as much as a Troopy though. Yes, you are 1,000% right when you say the Fortuner is a modern vehicle. After following you, you must have realized that I was struggling to follow you, consuming so much diesel and not being able to keep up. The soundproofing is terrible (yes, you can insulate but it does cost money).
3. The problem with the Troopy is that the storage is always in the way. I have always seen people with Troopies unloading tables, chairs, and so on before they could access the camper.
4. You mention the Fortuner is a "daily driver". You are right but this is not a full-time overlander consideration. I never unload my car to get my kids to school. My car is my home.
5. You get more storage with a trailer. More water, more fridges if you double everything, you get so much more autonomy to stay out in the bush.
6. Finally, you mentioned as a con that you need to pack up everything before you explore. This is not true. You can leave your table and chairs. Actually, everything you leave outside while you sleep can be left at the camp while you explore. It always depends on how comfortable you feel leaving stuff behind.

In conclusion, I don't think there is a one-fit-all solution. We are all struggling at some point. The problem of being a full-time overlander is that you are stuck with any solution you have taken. I know you do take the trailer on some trips and prefer the RTT on others. Well, you will not have this versatility anymore.

I think the most determining factor will be your pace of travel. Camping 3 nights in a row, I will go with the Troopy. Above 3 nights, I would go with a trailer.

Lastly, did I hear they'd stopped the Troopy in South Africa? You will have to find a well-sought after 2nd hand Troopy.

Good luck and hope your decision will prove to be the best.

Best regards,
Blaise
 
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Mud & Dust

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The struggle is real :laughing:

We usually base camp as well, one of the main reasons I got the trailer in the first place. There are a few places recently where we've done quite a few one-nighters and where I wouldn't take a trailer (notably crossing the Central Kalahari). My car is set up for self-sufficiency when I need it as well, just doesn't have a large interior living space obviously.

Keeping a good spot occupied is a good reason as well! With car-only camping I usually have to leave a table or something behind indicating that someone's camping there.

Towing; the trailer's curb weight is 990kg and GVM is 1500kg. It's fairly heavy (when fully loaded with water etc). The Fortuner only has a 3.0 turbo diesel but I don't struggle towing it. The Fortuner is cheap to maintain at least (same parts as a hilux and there a tons of those around). Having a trailer though does mean additional maintenance for it though (tyres, wheel bearings, breaks, shocks etc).

My trailer is more like an RV so very specific use, can't lug other stuff around with it unfortunately.

Have thought about the vehicle going into the shop as well, all your stuff's going with and you can't secure all of it and yes, you'd have to get an airbnb / hotel if the service is multi-day.

Will report back once I've decided, not in a rush fortunately

Thanks for your detailed input!

View attachment 191662 View attachment 191663
View attachment 191664 View attachment 191665
Ahaha. Do you remember when we got our chairs and table displaced? So it doesn't always work.
 
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Mud & Dust

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Everything is a trade off. I am leaning towards a truck with a slide in pop-top. It will make it very tippy however. There are so many options to chose.
I cannot agree more. Everything is a trade-off. The one-fit-all solution does not exist.
 

Get Out GO

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Thanks Blaise!

1. We’ll do a combo of one-nighters and base camping but probably more base camping.
2. Yup rhe 1HZ motor is bulletproof but it’s heavy on fuel and very slooow
3. When it’s set up like ASPW’s it’s not bad
4. Yes I meant just driving it every day
5. Yup, definitely more space in the trailer
6. Until someone moves it

FYI The Troopy is back in SA, R716k for the 1HZ


Hey Christoff,
As a full-time overlander (on pause due to Covid), I went through the same considerations.

Your analysis seems pretty good and thorough though there are a few missing notes:
1. Will you change camp every day? In this case, I would go with the Troopy. Or will you spend 4 or 5 nights at the same camp? I would then consider the trailer. As you know, I have zero trailer experience. So my expertise is limited to my LC79 experience and other similar vehicles.
2. You don't mention the reliability of a Troopy vs a Fortuner. If a Fortuner is basically the SUV version of a Hilux, it is quite reliable but not as much as a Troopy though. Yes, you are 1,000% right when you say the Fortuner is a modern vehicle. After following you, you must have realized that I was struggling to follow you, consuming so much diesel and not being able to keep up. The soundproofing is terrible (yes, you can insulate but it does cost money).
3. The problem with the Troopy is that the storage is always in the way. I have always seen people with Troopies unloading tables, chairs, and so on before they could access the camper.
4. You mention the Fortuner is a "daily driver". You are right but this is not a full-time overlander consideration. I never unload my car to get my kids to school. My car is my home.
5. You get more storage with a trailer. More water, more fridges if you double everything, you get so much more autonomy to stay out in the bush.
6. Finally, you mentioned as a con that you need to pack up everything before you explore. This is not true. You can leave your table and chairs. Actually, everything you leave outside while you sleep can be left at the camp while you explore. It always depends on how comfortable you feel leaving stuff behind.

In conclusion, I don't think there is a one-fit-all solution. We are all struggling at some point. The problem of being a full-time overlander is that you are stuck with any solution you have taken. I know you do take the trailer on some trips and prefer the RTT on others. Well, you will not have this versatility anymore.

I think the most determining factor will be your pace of travel. Camping 3 nights in a row, I will go with the Troopy. Above 3 nights, I would go with a trailer.

Lastly, did I hear they'd stopped the Troopy in South Africa? You will have to find a well-sought after 2nd hand Troopy.

Good luck and hope your decision will prove to be the best.

Best regards,
Blaise
 
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El-Dracho

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2. Yup rhe 1HZ motor is bulletproof but it’s heavy on fuel and very slooow
Hi Christoff,

This has nothing to do with trailer or no trailer, but you have brought the HZJ Troopy into the conversation. Is the Troopy in South Africa not available as a VDJ or GRJ? Am just curious...

Cheers, Björn
 

Get Out GO

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We only get the 4.2 1HZ in the Troopy. Only the 76 and 79 have the 4.5 V8 option. Albeit slow as a dog, the 1HZ is bulletproof and is better suited for the poor quality of local diesel
2. Yup rhe 1HZ motor is bulletproof but it’s heavy on fuel and very slooow
Hi Christoff,

This has nothing to do with trailer or no trailer, but you have brought the HZJ Troopy into the conversation. Is the Troopy in South Africa not available as a VDJ or GRJ? Am just curious...

Cheers, Björn
 

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Following this as well since I am going full time and so is my lady friend both after years of accumulating "stuff" we are really fighting the battle of wants vs needs and weight vs capacity with our current rigs. At least for the short term we are both going to be pulling a offroad and camping converted cargo trailer of some type. Probably around 5x8 to 6x12 in size.
 

Billiebob

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Traveler II

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earth
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Bill
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William
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With a home base and a job I prefer a Wrangler plus a SquareDrop but full time, I'd want a straight truck big enough to dine 2 and still have a permanent always made bed. Size would be my issue for full time, with enough to room stand up and get dressed yet compact and light enough to go anywhere and not break the bank if one gets stuck.

There was a 2WD E350 conversion for sale that was near perfect for me with a rear double bed and storage to fit mountain bikes under. My boggest recommendation to international, full time travel, fit everything behind locked doors, attract as little attention as possible, be invisible, hide all the bling.

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Full time, I'd rather not tow a trailer, but that depends on how many toys you want to bring.

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OverlandRS

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Portland, OR, USA
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TJ
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LoMac
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YES, a Ford Econoline cube van conversion is the most practical full time overlander I have seen on a everyman budget. You could also use a Ford Econoline hippo bus (shortbus) or ambulance, or short cube truck as well same basic size and shape. 4x4 conversions would be as simple as a van and some came factory with 4x4 but they are much rarer.
 

Apoclapedia

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Moha, British Columbia, Canada
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Matt
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Smith
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Ive never towed a trailer. I can fit what i need in the rig. But i often thought about building a shop trailer for long trips. A small trailer with my 5k genset, welder, lathe, milling machine and tools.
 
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OverlandRS

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Portland, OR, USA
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TJ
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LoMac
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Mill and Lathe that would be a very beefy heavy trailer, my mill would exceed the full cargo capacity of my entire rig. I am bring my flux welder overlanding though.