Fuel Prices: The Overlander's Friend

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Lifestyle Overland

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Navigator I

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Did anyone expect to see fuel as low as it is now? I didn't. And they're saying it's going to continue to be a slow recovery.

http://www.bloomberg.com/energy

Oil Falls to Lowest Since 2008 as OPEC Seen Fueling Supply Glut

How do you think this affects folks mindsets on purchasing bigger, 4WD vehicles?

Do you think this could be an opportunity to get more people interested and involved in the lifestyle? I know it makes me feel slightly better about the cost incurred. (Though I would still go with $4.00 a gallon prices.)
 

gandrimp

Rank III

Advocate II

When I had a rock crawler, I quit going when diesel hit 3.00 a gal. The crawler itself didn't burn hardly anything, but getting to the trails 70 miles away, in a 7-9 mpg diesel I had to quit. Now I doubt it would affect me, but my truck now gets nearly 20 mpg, that I can handle.
I really doubt cheap fuel will get more involved in this lifestyle.
 

RescueRangers

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There are lots of people who buy Jeeps who think its only for mudding. There are lots of people who buy 4x4's (even here in Fl) who never see so much as gravel. Just as there are lots of people who go camping but stay in the same spot the whole time (often just sitting around the campsite). I have lots of people talk to me who can't understand why I go on a two week vacation with no destination, only a direction. Basically, its not for the majority of people. In fact, I have seen many videos titled "Overland . . . " and it is obvious they just don't get the whole concept of what Overlanding is. If people are going to get started in it I don't think the price of gas is going to have anything to do with it. I really think there are a lot of people that are basically already doing it, they just haven't brought all of it together or haven't put a label to it. We would fall into another group, those that have the desire but just haven't found that piece of information that leads them to find out what is possible (luckily we did). If people have the desire they will find a way to do it.

Didn't someone on here move into a 400 sqft camper to promote their adventures?
 

IronPercheron

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I had been doin it, just didnt know till i started watching expedition overland.... now.... i have a whole new dream to chase and i love it.

Sent from my SM-G920V using Tapatalk
 

Steve

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People don't seem to mind the cost of enjoying their hobbies/sports/etc. The cost of commuting? Sure, but an extra $50 for higher priced gas on a $3000 vacation, probably not.

It does make me reconsider selling a couple of my scooters, as the market for them drops precipitously when gas prices drop.
 

WJ - Firefly

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My bigger 'cost' is time, not fuel. When I went to the Badlands with Jordan, my fuel cost was 75% of the trip (before i broke a brake line). I hadn't really considered it till after I got back. But, even now, I would do it again in a heartbeat. My current income level and current fuel prices don't really compare to the time it takes to get anywhere against all of my other time obligations.

What kind of scooters? I wouldn't mind reducing my 'commuting costs'... I really would like to find a good in-line twin (old school) between 350cc and 650 cc...
 

Steve

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What kind of scooters? I wouldn't mind reducing my 'commuting costs'... I really would like to find a good in-line twin (old school) between 350cc and 650 cc...
Way smaller than that. :)

50 cc 2005 Honda Metropolitan 100-120 MPG
150 cc 2006 Vespa LX 150 60+ MPG
180 cc 1965 Vespa Super Sport ?? MPG
400 cc 2007 Suzuki Burgman 60+ MPG
 
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WJ - Firefly

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The Burgman might be interesting. How does it do crusin' at 60 MPH? I live about 30 miles from where I work. All US highway in between, mixed two lane and four lane. Two cities to contend with and two towns. Regular traffic does 60-70 on these highways, dependent upon conditions. Would like 60+ mpg for the warm/dry days.
 

Steve

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@WJ_David I've had the B400 up to 85 MPH GPS, and wasn't wide open yet. Some claim it hits 100, but that might be speedo, not GPS. All scooter speedos are wildly optimistic. So, it'll go that fast, but is more comfortable to ride slower. Small tires make it more agile than a motorcycle, but twitchier in the wind. I've ridden it Interstate many times, and have to watch getting blown about by trucks.

If you're not dealing with trucks, and in the 20 mile range, it would probably be fine. A lot of folks on the Vespa forum commute much further on 300cc and 350cc scoots in California. Once in town, it is great, because acceleration is better than most cars, and the agility helps with traffic and pot holes. Plus, with the fairing and windscreen you get a lot more protection than on a motorcycle. With temporary wrap-on heated grips, I was commuting 8.5 miles as low as 19° F on 40 MPH roads. I've also had 5 one-dozen doughnut boxes (the old tall ones, not Dunkin Donut style) under the saddle.

If you're looking used, don't go older than 2007. There's a larger 650, too, but it weighs a lot more and has less storage and legroom.

I've been considering selling the Honda and the '65 Vespa, just to get a bit more room in the garage.
 

WJ - Firefly

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@WJ_David I've had the B400 up to 85 MPH GPS, and wasn't wide open yet. Some claim it hits 100, but that might be speedo, not GPS. All scooter speedos are wildly optimistic. So, it'll go that fast, but is more comfortable to ride slower. Small tires make it more agile than a motorcycle, but twitchier in the wind. I've ridden it Interstate many times, and have to watch getting blown about by trucks.

If you're not dealing with trucks, and in the 20 mile range, it would probably be fine. A lot of folks on the Vespa forum commute much further on 300cc and 350cc scoots in California. Once in town, it is great, because acceleration is better than most cars, and the agility helps with traffic and pot holes. Plus, with the fairing and windscreen you get a lot more protection than on a motorcycle. With temporary wrap-on heated grips, I was commuting 8.5 miles as low as 19° F on 40 MPH roads. I've also had 5 one-dozen doughnut boxes (the old tall ones, not Dunkin Donut style) under the saddle.

If you're looking used, don't go older than 2007. There's a larger 650, too, but it weighs a lot more and has less storage and legroom.

I've been considering selling the Honda and the '65 Vespa, just to get a bit more room in the garage.
I was noticing that prior to 2007, the 400 used a drive belt instead of a shaft. I actually prefer a belt to a shaft for the efficiency over shaft. I learned to ride on a 250 Enduro. In the late 80s I got a 75 Honda 750K (air cooled) that once I got it tuned could beat the chaps off most riders on 1000s. (Man I miss that bike.) Now I am a little ol man trying to reclaim some youth, but with an understanding of economics.

Personally I think I am deranged. My favorite choice would be 650 twin or 750 triple....
 

Steve

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@WJ_David All the Burgman 400s have a variator/centrifugal clutch belt drive. The 650 has a driveshaft/belt drive. There were many major changes between 2006 and 2007, all of which made the newer scoot a far, far better model. I rode shifter motorcycles for almost 40 years, but the scooter is a blast, much better in stop/go traffic, better weather protection, more storage, etc. But you better be okay with your masculinity, and not give a rat's ass about what people think of you, 'cause you will get a lot of grief riding a scooter. I embrace that; my Vespa LX is powder blue with a blue leopard seat cover. :sunglasses:

Here's a pic: Daily Drivers
 

Overland-Indiana

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@WJ_David All the Burgman 400s have a variator/centrifugal clutch belt drive. The 650 has a driveshaft/belt drive. There were many major changes between 2006 and 2007, all of which made the newer scoot a far, far better model. I rode shifter motorcycles for almost 40 years, but the scooter is a blast, much better in stop/go traffic, better weather protection, more storage, etc. But you better be okay with your masculinity, and not give a rat's ass about what people think of you, 'cause you will get a lot of grief riding a scooter. I embrace that; my Vespa LX is powder blue with a blue leopard seat cover. :sunglasses:

Here's a pic: Daily Drivers

@Steve if your gonna do it, do it right!! Powder blue and blue leopard seat is the only way to go!!
 
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