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Jedi

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I have run a pretty robust IFAK and STB/trauma kit for a while. One thing I had not been too concerned with was cardiac issues. That changed on Memorial Day when I had an MI resulting in angioplasty and a stent mid-LAD. So now I am trying to figure out what to include (besides aspirin and nitro) to help protect me in the field-to-door time frame. Especially when that time is extended by being in the middle of no where.

Most obvious to me is an AED... but what else?
 

El Solis

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For heart attacks/MI the mnemonic is M.O.N.A.(B) for Morphine, Oxygen, Nitroglycerin, Aspirin and the B is for Beta Blocker. Realistically if you have a MI that requires an AED and are way out in the bush your chances of surviving are very low. If you are just having chest pains and not a shockable rhythm the AED can’t help. Have something to take for pain, carry one of the small oxygen tanks you can get at Big 5 etc at high elevation stores (it’s only a few minutes worth but might help), and if you have known issues have your meds in a small pouch on the outside of the FAK. I carry an “Emergency Med” pouch w nitro, aspirin, epi pen, glucose gel, norco and Motrin.

Most important is to recognize symptoms early and evacuate to get help. Don’t dismiss chest pain.
 

Jedi

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Advocate I

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Ferndale, WA USA
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Brian
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McClory
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Thanks El Solis! I already carry the same "Emergency Meds" as you in my EDC, so I think the O2 bottle might be the only other thing I need to add. That has the added benefit of being useable in other situations where someone's O2 saturation drops.
 
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Fozzy325

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As an ex-combat Medic and mountain rescue medic the key things he has highlighted is:
Trauma medical kit vs base camp medical kit. (Note that he doesn’t use the words first aid)

What he has in his trauma kit promotes recovery. He is not treating the injury. Big difference.
Remember make the casualty stable and comfortable. This what this kit is for.

@Overlandmd can you make a video explaining the difference between.
first response - Trauma actions
Trauma routine - sustain casualty until access to medical services

And the difference between
1. first responder actions - limited equipment - immobilize & promote recovery & stabilization e.g don’t clean the wounds let clotting happen.
2. Trauma units - all equipment - fixing the issues
3. Ongoing recovery care - Choice of equipment - back to normality

In relation to over-landing and time to medical services.
 

Overland A Far

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Watched the latest video on off grid emergency kits - all good info however there is one thing that no one has mentioned anywhere in this thread. And that is a BURN KIT. With camp fires a must when camping and given all the recent wildfires up here in Canada and the western US dealing with a burn victim is likely - kids, other campers and even our emergency service personnel. This was another part of our required carry gear (corporate direction) and a good idea. Consider purchasing one and also note I understand that these can be left in the vehicle (freezing will not damage them).
 
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El Solis

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@OverlandAFar

Excellent point. I made an Instagram post about burns but haven’t had the time to write one up for here. Hopefully in the next few weeks I’ll have a few posts done. Burns, immediate care/stabilization vs prolonged care/transport, trauma kit vs basecamp first aid kit vs boo boo kit, and a few other topics are lined up already.

Everyone please feel free to throw out topics you’d like to hear about.

Chris
 
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Fozzy325

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Besides human related sickness it would be good to know a way of getting stats for rural classification of incidents related to overlanding.

In my opinion this is what I would say

Camp sites
1. Burns
2. Lacerations
3. Puncture wounds
4. Trips slips and fall injuries
5. Crush injuries

Back country
1. Impact
2. Cuts and lacerations
3. Falls / rock fall
4. Exposure (this is a variable dependent on time of incident, season and weather
5. Infection / poisoning (brought into the environment from outside)
 
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