Define "Overlanding"

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Yroundrdn

Rank 0

Contributor I

60
San Diego, CA, USA
First Name
Ben
For me it's being as minimal as possible but as comfortable as I want to be with the rig. Then climbing in with the wife and spending some great time alone in the wilderness. It's fun to have a rig you know from front to back and take the routes you think it can do. I've had to turn around on some trips, get pulled out of mud, and even gone days without needing 4x4. It's about seeing amazing places and getting away however you can. Just go for it and get out where no one can be found. Then come home with a list of more fun stuff to do on the rig for the next trip.
 

Buckaroo

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Member

Pathfinder I

1,251
Bramley, Rotherham, South Yorkshire Forest, UK
First Name
Dave
Last Name
M
Member #

19695

Ham Callsign
CB Handle: Buckaroo, UK FM Ch.30
If you really think about it , backpackers travel hundreds of miles on foot with everything they need to survive on their backs and manage to keep it in the 20-40lb range , but for some odd reason when you have a vehicle you need 300lbs of camping gear 100 lbs of food , a memory foam mattress and solar power to run all those electronics. Most people seem to be trying to set up their weekend trip rig like someone who is living out of theirs fill time .
Keep your gear as simple as possible and you will enjoy your trips more .
some of us DO live in our rigs for a long periods of time.
for weeks on end , this is my home.
 
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MazeVX

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Pathfinder I

2,484
Gießen Germany
First Name
Mathias
Last Name
Kreicker
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8001

It's different for everyone, trying to define it means wasting time.

I will call myself "overland bounder" because I am member.

Using a term to describe what you do makes no sense when you have to explain the term, given that, I only use "overlanding" when speaking to other members.
 

RescueRangers

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Member

Pathfinder I

2,055
Fleming Island, Fl
Member #

0675

Several years ago we started doing road trips but found that something was missing. We knew there was more to it but didn't really know what that was. On one trip we went to Cades Cove in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Being short on time, we took a gravel trail to get out of the park. Half way up the trail we rounded a corner and there was this holy crap view. At that moment we looked at each with the same thought, we are one of the very few to get to see this. A short time later we ran across Overland Journal at a book store. That one issue showed us what we were missing. It gave us our direction.

At first I wanted to know what Overlanding really was but the more I read the less I cared what the definition was. I have a bunch of books written by people who have traveled in North, Central, and South America, Asia, Europe, Africa, or just around the world. After reading the first couple it became clear what Overlanding is and what its all about. We also quickly learned that Overland styles are just as varied as the people who Overland. To each of them the rig, the gear, the roads and trails, are all tools to get to where they want to explore. And to each, learning about the people who live where they are is just as important to them as that holy crap view. What I got from each of them was to have the courage to get out of your comfort zone and go somewhere you have never been, appreciate what nature has to offer, and meet people who are different from you so you can see just how similar they are to you.

Shortly after learning about Overlanding for the first time we ran across OB. Since then there has probably been 300 posts asking about or stating the definition of Overlanding. The conversations over the years have been like sitting on a beach watching the ocean waves come in. At first it was the "you're not an Overlander if . . ." Then it moved into the down play phase, Overlanding is off-roading and camping. I really loved the hiding in the woods phase, find a campsite as far from people as possible and stay there for a week. At one point we had the "I'm too good to call myself an Overlander". Then of course, we had the elitist movement, "if you have more than $300 invested in your rig and gear you are an elitist". By far the worse has to be "if you don't do what I do, you are not an Overlander . . . or just plain stupid". If you read them you can see that a lot of folks get it, but there is likely just as many who just want the definition to conform to what they already do, even if it means going to the same National Forest and camping at the same campsite year after year.

I constantly read people talk about going to some National Forest and finding a campsite to spend a week camping, and call it Overlanding. We wouldn't call it Overlanding but then its not my place to say one way or the other. We recently talked about attending Overland Expo for the entire week. It quickly came up that we would need to run the frig for four days straight and would need solar or a dual battery set up. Then it dawned on us, the reason we had not thought about this before is because we had never basecamped before. We do two trips a year, 8 or 9 days traveling between 1,500 and 2,500 miles each. When we get home we usually have over a thousand pictures to go through. If you are in the mindset that Overlanding is just off-roading and camping, in our humble opinion, you are really selling yourself short. It is a wonderful "hobby" but it does take the courage to leave your comfort zone far behind.

My basic point here is, no one is wrong. We each have our own wants and desired, financial or time limitations, or just plain situation, so who has the right to say someone else is wrong because they don't fit into your view of Overlanding. If you know that trail is just a tool used to take you to something few others have seen, and that small town you are passing through can be just as interesting as that holy crap view, you are an Overlander. If you don't, that's alright too. Just give others respect to have a difference of opinion.
 

Lanlubber

Rank V
Member

Traveler III

2,327
Mimbres, NM, USA
Member #

16986

Ham Callsign
none - BREAKER BREAKER HAND HELD CB AND WALKIE TALKIE
Several years ago we started doing road trips but found that something was missing. We knew there was more to it but didn't really know what that was. On one trip we went to Cades Cove in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Being short on time, we took a gravel trail to get out of the park. Half way up the trail we rounded a corner and there was this holy crap view. At that moment we looked at each with the same thought, we are one of the very few to get to see this. A short time later we ran across Overland Journal at a book store. That one issue showed us what we were missing. It gave us our direction.

At first I wanted to know what Overlanding really was but the more I read the less I cared what the definition was. I have a bunch of books written by people who have traveled in North, Central, and South America, Asia, Europe, Africa, or just around the world. After reading the first couple it became clear what Overlanding is and what its all about. We also quickly learned that Overland styles are just as varied as the people who Overland. To each of them the rig, the gear, the roads and trails, are all tools to get to where they want to explore. And to each, learning about the people who live where they are is just as important to them as that holy crap view. What I got from each of them was to have the courage to get out of your comfort zone and go somewhere you have never been, appreciate what nature has to offer, and meet people who are different from you so you can see just how similar they are to you.

Shortly after learning about Overlanding for the first time we ran across OB. Since then there has probably been 300 posts asking about or stating the definition of Overlanding. The conversations over the years have been like sitting on a beach watching the ocean waves come in. At first it was the "you're not an Overlander if . . ." Then it moved into the down play phase, Overlanding is off-roading and camping. I really loved the hiding in the woods phase, find a campsite as far from people as possible and stay there for a week. At one point we had the "I'm too good to call myself an Overlander". Then of course, we had the elitist movement, "if you have more than $300 invested in your rig and gear you are an elitist". By far the worse has to be "if you don't do what I do, you are not an Overlander . . . or just plain stupid". If you read them you can see that a lot of folks get it, but there is likely just as many who just want the definition to conform to what they already do, even if it means going to the same National Forest and camping at the same campsite year after year.

I constantly read people talk about going to some National Forest and finding a campsite to spend a week camping, and call it Overlanding. We wouldn't call it Overlanding but then its not my place to say one way or the other. We recently talked about attending Overland Expo for the entire week. It quickly came up that we would need to run the frig for four days straight and would need solar or a dual battery set up. Then it dawned on us, the reason we had not thought about this before is because we had never basecamped before. We do two trips a year, 8 or 9 days traveling between 1,500 and 2,500 miles each. When we get home we usually have over a thousand pictures to go through. If you are in the mindset that Overlanding is just off-roading and camping, in our humble opinion, you are really selling yourself short. It is a wonderful "hobby" but it does take the courage to leave your comfort zone far behind.

My basic point here is, no one is wrong. We each have our own wants and desired, financial or time limitations, or just plain situation, so who has the right to say someone else is wrong because they don't fit into your view of Overlanding. If you know that trail is just a tool used to take you to something few others have seen, and that small town you are passing through can be just as interesting as that holy crap view, you are an Overlander. If you don't, that's alright too. Just give others respect to have a difference of opinion.
Very well said and with dignity and respect to all in this thread. I completely agree with all of your statement and thank you for taking the time to spell it out so eloquently !
 

Lanlubber

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2,327
Mimbres, NM, USA
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none - BREAKER BREAKER HAND HELD CB AND WALKIE TALKIE
I try not to fret much over the word. It is just a fancy word for camping, just like utilize is a fancy word for "use".

Some people need to feel more special, so they need a special word. Others of us have been at this for long enough to keep doing what we have always been doing and not really care what anyone calls it.
I use the word because I belong to Overland Bound. If they do it , so do I.
 

MidOH

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Mid Ohio
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John
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Clark
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YourHighness
I try not to fret much over the word. It is just a fancy word for camping, just like utilize is a fancy word for "use".

Some people need to feel more special, so they need a special word. Others of us have been at this for long enough to keep doing what we have always been doing and not really care what anyone calls it.
My special word is ''booty''.

And ''Ni!''.
 
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DoubleA_FL

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Contributor II

271
Florida, USA
First Name
Aaron
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DoubleA
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18439

Pimping your 4x4 with as many comfort items you can cram in and on. Taking it on a semi paved road 1 mile from Starbucks and then stage it so seems you are in the middle of Africa so you can post to instagram.
this sounds fantastic. :laughing:
 
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DoubleA_FL

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Contributor II

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Florida, USA
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Aaron
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DoubleA
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I often think it would be funny for me to start a youtube channel or something and call it Ghettoverlanding, because my setup is so ghetto it's not even funny. $1800 Craigslist beater pre 2000 honda, home built, kludged up kit, everything old or second hand lol I still have a lot of fun though! I bet if I added up everything I've spent on my rig other than oil changes I'd probably be less than 5k into it.
I would definitely subscribe!

AA