CPAP power

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reaver

Rank V
Member

Off-Road Ranger I

1,580
Caldwell, ID, USA
First Name
Brian
Last Name
McGahuey
Member #

23711

Ham Callsign
GMRS WRMV941
Yup. Depending on the model you have, if there's a DC adapter, you can easily power it with a lithium battery pack.

I've done it it using two different packs.

I got two solid nights when using the dc adapter for my airsense 10, and turning the heated hose and humidifier off with this pack:


I bought this, and can power both my wife and my CPAPs for two nights (probably 3) using the same settings:


Basically, you'll need to find out how much power your machine uses when it's running, and how many nights you'll need to accommodate, and choose accordingly.
 

Yaniv

Rank III
Member

Influencer II

800
Israel
First Name
Yaniv
Last Name
Eliash
Member #

23310

Ham Callsign
4X5DL
I use a battery jumper pack (like NOCO) with a 12V to AC (150W) to power the unit all night
 

theoriginalgiga

Rank II
Member

Contributor II

301
Sacramento, CA, USA
First Name
Travis
Last Name
Chaney
Member #

23423

Ham Callsign
KM6WFI
I took a different approach, I installed a secondary 100AH solar AGM battery into my truck under the back seat for accessories (light bar, accessory charging, CB radio etc) and put a renology 40amp DC-to-DC charger to separate the secondary battery from the primary charge circuit for 2 reasons. 1) keep the primary system only for starting the truck and 2) a solar battery will have a higher float charge and a vehicle alternator won't fully charge it. I can run my CPAP 8+ hours without concern and in the morning I'm usually off and away and the charge controller tops off the battery. Down side is I need to camp close to my rig and need a couple 12v extension cables and it wasn't exactly cheap. Alternatively you can swap out your car battery for an optima Yellowtop but if you do that confirm that your draw for your cpap per hour is at or below half the rated battery capacity divided by however long you intend to run the CPAP. IE if the battery has 55AH, you'll want to make sure your CPAP doesn't pull more than 3.5amps an hour assuming you'll be using it for 8 hours (55/2/8=3.4375). You should still have enough energy to start your rig in the morning.