Bin Labels and first aid and fire extinguisher stickers

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Rove43

Rank 0

Contributor I

60
Edmonton, AB, Canada
First Name
Jeff
Last Name
R
Hey Everyone,

I am considering having some vinyl sticker sheets made with bin labels on them. I just wanted to get a sense of how many people might be interested in something like that?
Labels would be as below
- Recovery
- Kitchen
- Tools
- Parts
- Food
- Misc.
Additional stickers I was thinking is location stickers for first aid and fire extinguisher.

Anyways would love to get peoples feedback and thoughts!

Thanks Jeff
 

Road

Not into ranks, titles or points.
Member

Advocate III

3,379
On the road in North America
First Name
Road
Last Name
.
Member #

6589

Hey Everyone,

I am considering having some vinyl sticker sheets made with bin labels on them. I just wanted to get a sense of how many people might be interested in something like that?
Labels would be as below
- Recovery
- Kitchen
- Tools
- Parts
- Food
- Misc.
Additional stickers I was thinking is location stickers for first aid and fire extinguisher.

Anyways would love to get peoples feedback and thoughts!

Thanks Jeff
.
My sense is, Jeff, that most can print content labels themselves with a more specific name; already have a printer they use; or like the decals, stickers, and patches they can already get from their fav vendor, like BROG or similar.
Most I know prefer labeled patches with hook & loop, so they can swap it as needed. There are several companies that sell "First Aid Kit Inside" type stickers.

Personally, I don't like putting pre-purchased adhesive content labels on my gear, as the term is rarely specific enough. And, I may change the contents of that case or box later and I'm not a fan of peeling off year old stickers or laying another over the top.

I use transparent card holders, with card stock labels inside that list contents. If I put a permanent sticker on there that says PARTS, for example, it doesn't tell me much.

cardholder_4992.jpg
...
cubpacks-nosebox-rt_6606 copy.jpeg
.

Generic stickers might be handy for some, though my sense is, that if you're thinking you can start a small side business making labeled content stickers, there isn't enough market to make it worthwhile. Marketing that kind of business itself can be time-consuming, and is usually part of a larger business's accessories to a main product line.

..
 
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Road

Not into ranks, titles or points.
Member

Advocate III

3,379
On the road in North America
First Name
Road
Last Name
.
Member #

6589

My 4 boxes are labeled. Kitchen, Stuff, More Stuff and To Much Stuff. Kind of works out what is important and so on!
.
I saw a solitary closet door in a restaurant in London, ONT once that was labeled "STUFF" - cracked me up.

I bet they had customers continually opening it looking for the bathroom, so finally labeled it.
.
 

Rove43

Rank 0

Contributor I

60
Edmonton, AB, Canada
First Name
Jeff
Last Name
R
.
My sense is, Jeff, that most can print content labels themselves with a more specific name; already have a printer they use; or like the decals, stickers, and patches they can already get from their fav vendor, like BROG or similar.
Most I know prefer labeled patches with hook & loop, so they can swap it as needed. There are several companies that sell "First Aid Kit Inside" type stickers.

Personally, I don't like putting pre-purchased adhesive content labels on my gear, as the term is rarely specific enough. And, I may change the contents of that case or box later and I'm not a fan of peeling off year old stickers or laying another over the top.

I use transparent card holders, with card stock labels inside that list contents. If I put a permanent sticker on there that says PARTS, for example, it doesn't tell me much.

View attachment 197417
...
View attachment 197418
.

Generic stickers might be handy for some, though my sense is, that if you're thinking you can start a small side business making labeled content stickers, there isn't enough market to make it worthwhile. Marketing that kind of business itself can be time-consuming, and is usually part of a larger business's accessories to a main product line.

..
Thanks for your input, really appreciate it, you make a lot of sense on quite a few points! I have a little side thing for nature/adventure stickers and was thinking about adding it to my collection. Thought of it as I am working on getting own truck planned out and organized so like i said just wanted to get a sense of things

Looks like you have gotten things pretty organized! Just curious which bins do you use?
 
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Road

Not into ranks, titles or points.
Member

Advocate III

3,379
On the road in North America
First Name
Road
Last Name
.
Member #

6589

Thanks for your input, really appreciate it, you make a lot of sense on quite a few points! I have a little side thing for nature/adventure stickers and was thinking about adding it to my collection. Thought of it as I am working on getting own truck planned out and organized so like i said just wanted to get a sense of things

Looks like you have gotten things pretty organized! Just curious which bins do you use?
.
Oh boy, I'm a container, box, and case nerd from way back. So since you asked, I'm gonna fill up this post with info for you :tonguewink:.

I've used all sorts of things over the years for storage of general gear, from homemade plywood pull-out drawers, solid-sided square bins from Target, to Plano and Sterilite totes, and Pelican for more sensitive gear or when I want carry-on or to ship things.

Top o' the line is my Zarges aluminum cases, of which I have three K470s, all certified by the IGBC to be Grizzly Bear resistant. Handy when you camp in places that will fine you for leaving bins and coolers out that are not bear-resistant. Zarges K470s are the original heavy duty aluminum expedition case. They're expensive, though worth it in my opinion for their rugged weatherproof durability and dependability. They're the kind of gear my grandkid will be able to give to his offspring and say "Your Great-Grandfather Road used these all over the continent back in the days when they still had diesel engines. He used to tell me that every one of these dents and dings tell a story. Are those claw marks?"

Zarges makes great non-certified cases too, that are very appealing and less expensive. Their K440 series.

organized_0988-900.jpg
The black Sterilite totes in this image are my favorite for storage at home for household, garden, and seasonal travel gear. Gear cases that travel regularly are on the top shelf.

My storage system for adventure gear has evolved to using mostly durable, smaller, same-sized containers that stack well, have single-wall thickness, straight sides and flat tops, and that can serve more than one purpose like seating or work surface support in camp.

Here's why:
1. Less wasted space than with thick double-walled cases like Action Packers or tapered bins like Rubbermaid and Sterilite. Look at the amount of space between the black totes in the home storage image above.
2. Smaller cases means more organized. I just pull out the case I need instead of dragging out a larger tote and rummaging through it to find what I need and having to repack it. It usually ends up disorganized and messy.
3. I can move things freely between van and trailer or about camp without major shifting of other gear.
4. Easier to pack up top on trailer rack or van roof and easier/lighter to retrieve just what I want.

The image in my earlier post has two FRO Flat Packs and two Cub Packs:

In 2017 I purchased four each of Front Runner Outfitter's Wolf Packs and Cub Packs, as well as two of their Flat Packs (fits inside Wolf Packs, though can be used on their own) which fold flat when not using, which is really handy. I like the way FRO packs work so much I bought two more of the soft packs, a couple High Lids for the Wolf Packs, and recently got four more Cub Packs for more efficient slide out van organization.

I also use the Cub Packs and Wolf Packs elsewhere, like these two Wolf Packs in the cargo bay of my trailer. The corners are beefed up, have holes for tying down (that do not go through to the interior), and indents in the tops that both strengthen the top and provide cross notching for further tie-downs. I've used these Wolf Packs hard over the years, throwing 'em around full of firewood, standing on them, etc and never cracked or broken one.

packmaster_1650-900.jpg

The Cub Packs and Wolf Packs are actually South African ammo case designs. They are available private-labeled from a couple diff vendors, of which FRO is the most well-known and available in the US. FRO alsos make rugged rooftop weather-proof bags with their Wolf and Cub Packs in mind, like the Typhoon Bag. It used to be called the Monsoon Bag. I have one, love it, and depend on it. They also make a six-box drawer platform systems that will handle both size packs.

Like anything, especially these days of increased interest in outdoor recreation, higher prices and items being out of stock, it pays to shop around. Sometimes one outfit (I linked to three different ones above for the Wolf and Cub Packs) will have free shipping over a certain amount, or reduced prices for a period of time. Exploration Outfitters in Oklahoma, where I bought all my original Wolf Packs and Cub Packs four years ago, and who sell a ton of Front Runner, Goose Gear, and other top notch storage and recovery products, as well as the Australian Patriot Campers, is an excellent place to find what you're after. As of this writing, ExploreOutdoor Overland Outfitters has the best overall deal on FRO storage because they have free shipping on orders over $100.00.

#noaffiliation with either outfit - I just like the way they both do business.

I could go on at length about case and containers and what I like to use. . .

org_0436-900.jpg
.

Also, Jeff - in looking up links for this post, I ran across Front Runner Outfitters' labels, too, you might be interested in: Organizing Labels
.
 
Last edited:
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Rove43

Rank 0

Contributor I

60
Edmonton, AB, Canada
First Name
Jeff
Last Name
R
.
Oh boy, I'm a container, box, and case nerd from way back. So since you asked, I'm gonna fill up this post with info for you :tonguewink:.

I've used all sorts of things over the years for storage of general gear, from homemade plywood pull-out drawers, solid-sided square bins from Target, to Plano and Sterilite totes, and Pelican for more sensitive gear or when I want carry-on or to ship things.

Top o' the line is my Zarges aluminum cases, of which I have three K470s, all certified by the IGBC to be Grizzly Bear resistant. Handy when you camp in places that will fine you for leaving bins and coolers out that are not bear-resistant. Zarges K470s are the original heavy duty aluminum expedition case. They're expensive, though worth it in my opinion for their rugged weatherproof durability and dependability. They're the kind of gear my grandkid will be able to give to his offspring and say "Your Great-Grandfather Road used these all over the continent back in the days when they still had diesel engines. He used to tell me that every one of these dents and dings tell a story. Are those claw marks?"

Zarges makes great non-certified cases too, that are very appealing and less expensive. Their K440 series.

View attachment 197426
The black Sterilite totes in this image are my favorite for storage at home for household, garden, and seasonal travel gear. Gear cases that travel regularly are on the top shelf.

My storage system for adventure gear has evolved to using mostly durable, smaller, same-sized containers that stack well, have single-wall thickness, straight sides and flat tops, and that can serve more than one purpose like seating or work surface support in camp.

Here's why:
1. Less wasted space than with thick double-walled cases like Action Packers or tapered bins like Rubbermaid and Sterilite. Look at the amount of space between the black totes in the home storage image above.
2. Smaller cases means more organized. I just pull out the case I need instead of dragging out a larger tote and rummaging through it to find what I need and having to repack it. It usually ends up disorganized and messy.
3. I can move things freely between van and trailer or about camp without major shifting of other gear.
4. Easier to pack up top on trailer rack or van roof and easier/lighter to retrieve just what I want.

The image in my earlier post has two FRO Flat Packs and two Cub Packs:

In 2017 I purchased four each of Front Runner Outfitter's Wolf Packs and Cub Packs, as well as two of their Flat Packs (fits inside Wolf Packs, though can be used on their own) which fold flat when not using, which is really handy. I like the way FRO packs work so much I bought two more of the soft packs, a couple High Lids for the Wolf Packs, and recently got four more Cub Packs for more efficient slide out van organization.

I also use the Cub Packs and Wolf Packs elsewhere, like these two Wolf Packs in the cargo bay of my trailer. The corners are beefed up, have holes for tying down (that do not go through to the interior), and indents in the tops that both strengthen the top and provide cross notching for further tie-downs. I've used these Wolf Packs hard over the years, throwing 'em around full of firewood, standing on them, etc and never cracked or broken one.

View attachment 197425

The Cub Packs and Wolf Packs are actually South African ammo case designs. They are available private-labeled from a couple diff vendors, of which FRO is the most well-known and available in the US. FRO alsos make rugged rooftop weather-proof bags with their Wolf and Cub Packs in mind, like the Typhoon Bag. It used to be called the Monsoon Bag. I have one, love it, and depend on it. They also make a six-box drawer platform systems that will handle both size packs.

Like anything, especially these days of increased interest in outdoor recreation, higher prices and items being out of stock, it pays to shop around. Sometimes one outfit (I linked to three different ones above for the Wolf and Cub Packs) will have free shipping over a certain amount, or reduced prices for a period of time. Exploration Outfitters in Oklahoma, where I bought all my original Wolf Packs and Cub Packs four years ago, and who sell a ton of Front Runner, Goose Gear, and other top notch storage and recovery products, as well as the Australian Patriot Campers, is an excellent place to find what you're after. As of this writing, ExploreOutdoor Overland Outfitters has the best overall deal on FRO storage because they have free shipping on orders over $100.00.

#noaffiliation with either outfit - I just like the way they both do business.

I could go on at length about case and containers and what I like to use. . .

View attachment 197429
.

Also, Jeff - in looking up links for this post, I ran across Front Runner Outfitters' labels, too, you might be interested in: Organizing Labels
.
Wow this is a tone of great info for bins, and again making a tone of great points, I am definitely going to check them all out. You have given me a great place to start and the cogs are turning in my head on the direction I am going to go! Great advice!!
 
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Reactions: Road

Road

Not into ranks, titles or points.
Member

Advocate III

3,379
On the road in North America
First Name
Road
Last Name
.
Member #

6589

Wow this is a tone of great info for bins, and again making a tone of great points, I am definitely going to check them all out. You have given me a great place to start and the cogs are turning in my head on the direction I am going to go! Great advice!!
.
Cool, glad it helped. :sunglasses:
.
 
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