Are U.S.A and Canada really the mecca of the overland?

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viveen4wd

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Are U.S.A and Canada really the mecca of the overland?
From my point of view, yes. That is why I have a small aspiration to prepare my trips in a similar way to how you do it there. I know that in Spain the initial distances are not as long as they can be in your trips, but even so I ask you to measure some advice or tricks to prepare my trip ... (gps, refrigerator, store, main objects, etc ..)
thanks and greetings !!
 
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MOAK

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Interesting question. I consider Australia to be the Mecca of Overlanding, but I do live in the USA’s northeast seaboard. In order to do any driving off pavement or very far off the beaten path one must either go north and into Canada, ( about 400 miles to the border) or head across The Mississippi River to get to any dirt road worth traveling upon. I read Graham Bell’s story about this, and from his point of view he’s correct. If mostly paved roads and all the trappings that are a part of being on paved roads are your thing, then yes, tis the Mecca. I’m sure Graham Bell, after traveling through some of the most remote places on earth, was more than happy to enjoy the conveniences that are a part of being on pavement.
 

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I would have thought Australia too, but it has blown up in a big way in North America. I live in central Ontario and there are tons of places to explore if you head north, but I feel like BC more of an overland potential with more mountains, but Ontario has access to the Arctic lol.
I have done a lot of road tripping and overlanding in the US around Nevada, Arizona, California and Utah and I love the desert.
I have also been to Equador, Peru, Iceland, the Galapagos islands and everywhere kinda has its own appeal.
North America is just branding it better.
 

viveen4wd

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We love mountainous areas that is why we are also very interested in all the regions that you have in America and Canada. Here in Europe there are also similar areas, but not the same. And it is not to belittle what we have here.
 
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ThundahBeagle

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While North America has the Mississippi River, the Grand Canyon, Yellowstone National Park, the High Plains and the Rocky Mountains and so much more, I've never been west of the Mississippi. I imagine those are all great places to visit and I plan to find out this May.

The US is more well known for the "Road Trip" than Overlanding per se. Mainly because the big push westward happened 100 years ago with conestoga wagons instead of Land Rovers and Jeeps.

Even still, Australia seems to have the most romanticized and well known version of Overlanding. To my mind at least.

I've driven in Mexico from the beach to the ruins and throughout southern Brasil. Unfortunately never yet to the western mountains of S. America, but maybe some day. I've driven around some of the Great Lakes to PEI.

But I would still think that a place like Asia, from Moscow to Kamchatka, Siberia to the Himalayas, would be the real Mecca for Overlanding. Every terrain imaginable and the largest continent on which to travel?
 
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bgenlvtex

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Not having to concern yourself with local Warlords (outside of major metropolitan areas) adds a degree of attraction for me.