Anyone explore the kootneys in their adventures?

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dblack

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Sherwood Park, AB
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I've been reading up on the area, but haven't spent a lot of time there. Did some of Grey creek pass last year, but it was too early in the season, and the snow turned me back. Definitely on my to do list.
 
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Rexplorer

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Lake Country, BC, Canada
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so much cool stuff in that area. mines and lookouts and hotsprings and lakes and... man too much to see in a lifetime. don't forget the backroads map book. helped me find some cool stuff.
 
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titicaca

Rank IV

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854
Calgary
@Mr.Mango
Thanks for posting that trip here too. I read it on www.overlandcanada.com but looks like that website is gone. I wonder what happened as just a few months ago I was reading a bunch of interesting posts. What a shame such a wealth of information went puff!

Never too late to plane trips and share with others. My main plan this summer would be hiking/backpacking along the way in Monica Meddow, St Mary’s Alpine, Kokanee Glacier Provincial Park, Valhalla Provincial Park.

Very impressive how you connected the Caribou Creek Rd up and over to the Wragge Beach rec-site. I was reading your trail description as loose rock, boulders, ruts, narrow trail, tight switchbacks, sharp rocks, 10 to 15 point turns. I only have a stock Rubi and will be fully loaded with kids! I wonder if I can do this. I have no offroad experience, nor any recovery gear yet. Just thinking through what is required.

Were you confident being on you own in such terrain?

It seems challenging to find like-minded folks to go with. My like-minded Vann digram, 1) family with kids 7 to 12 ish age, 2) want to do multi-day backpacking, and 3) want to off road /overland in remote and more serious places. 4) able to agree on and co-ordinate holiday schedules. This shrinks to almost no one I suspect, so each to their own I guess.

What are the main risks on remote Kootenays trails?

We are not talking major rock crawling obstacles, or mud bogs. Sounds like sharp rocks and going through your tires would be the primary concern. Even with large tires you got a blow-out on a sidewall. Did you air down too little or too much or it just happens? I’m thinking a good tire repair kit would be a must have. Communications, for logging truck calls, and in case of an emergency, seems high on the list.

From my experience camping in the Kootenays – don’t forget the chicken wire to protect the vehicle from porcupines.
 
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Mr.Mango

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Wainwright, Alberta
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@Mr.Mango
Thanks for posting that trip here too. I read it on www.overlandcanada.com but looks like that website is gone. I wonder what happened as just a few months ago I was reading a bunch of interesting posts. What a shame such a wealth of information went puff!

Never too late to plane trips and share with others. My main plan this summer would be hiking/backpacking along the way in Monica Meddow, St Mary’s Alpine, Kokanee Glacier Provincial Park, Valhalla Provincial Park.

Very impressive how you connected the Caribou Creek Rd up and over to the Wragge Beach rec-site. I was reading your trail description as loose rock, boulders, ruts, narrow trail, tight switchbacks, sharp rocks, 10 to 15 point turns. I only have a stock Rubi and will be fully loaded with kids! I wonder if I can do this. I have no offroad experience, nor any recovery gear yet. Just thinking through what is required.

Were you confident being on you own in such terrain?

It seems challenging to find like-minded folks to go with. My like-minded Vann digram, 1) family with kids 7 to 12 ish age, 2) want to do multi-day backpacking, and 3) want to off road /overland in remote and more serious places. 4) able to agree on and co-ordinate holiday schedules. This shrinks to almost no one I suspect, so each to their own I guess.

What are the main risks on remote Kootenays trails?

We are not talking major rock crawling obstacles, or mud bogs. Sounds like sharp rocks and going through your tires would be the primary concern. Even with large tires you got a blow-out on a sidewall. Did you air down too little or too much or it just happens? I’m thinking a good tire repair kit would be a must have. Communications, for logging truck calls, and in case of an emergency, seems high on the list.

From my experience camping in the Kootenays – don’t forget the chicken wire to protect the vehicle from porcupines.
Hi titicaca,
Never did find out what happened to OverlandCanada. It looked like they were hacked. Probably just walked away from it. You are right, quite a shame.
The Caribou Creek Rd to Wragge Beach was a quest for me. I hate going up a road and then turning around and coming back down. I always look for the round trip route. Google Earth is both a wonder and a devil.
Always looks easy when planning on GE. Once you are there, then it become real.
To answer your question on this route...
A stock Rubicon would of handled this trail without even blinking. It was definitely tough going and pretty hairy in spots but a JKRU would be fine. That said, we would not of made it through without a chainsaw, shovel and winch. Would recommend these. Going up was easy, coming down was scary. Always remember to shift into low 4x4 and stay off your break on these types of steep descents.
As for being alone, or rather a single vehicle... If you are well equipped for most events, such as avalanches, you will feel confident. We have a Garmin Inreach GPS (https://explore.garmin.com/en-US/inreach) which has a satellite connection. We can text or send a SOS from anywhere. An absolute must for travelling by yourself.
We are very unsociable people and are very specific in what we like, so as you said, it is very difficult to find like minded people. They are out there and we do look.
To go off the beaten track but to stay off the rock crawling, insane routes, get yourself a bumper and winch. Doesn't have to be super expensive. My XRC bumper and XR winch were $1000 total. I installed them.
You need the Inreach, chainsaw, shovel, first-aid, small air compressor, a hi-lift jack, CB radio is a good idea but remember that logging trucks use a different system than CB. CB is good for contacting other 4x4s.
We now bring a shotgun. When you are far away from civilization and you hear a bear or wolf outside your tent, you will feel a little safer with it. At the very least, bear spray, especially if you are hiking.
As for the puncture, I wasn't looking where I was going and I think I backed into a fallen tree and hit a branch. You can bring plugs for punctures but have your spare.
Be aware of weather as well. Summer rain storms in higher elevations can be scary. Plan, plan and plan.
A bit all over the place with this reply. Hope it helps.
 
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titicaca

Rank IV

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854
Calgary
Thanks @Mr.Mango for all the ideas.

A friend donated chicken wire for my upcoming trip to the Kootenays and I had to figure how to transport it home. There is only the one place to put it, just for looks .... I wonder how many people around town will wonder what the heck this is for.
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