2WD

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BensonSTW

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The biggest thing about running a 2 wheel drive or 4 whhel drive or wheeling alone - basically anytime you leave your house - know your limitations. Rwd in a foot of snow is not a good idea. 5.13s and lockers probably not the best to drive California to New York on the freeway. Know when to look at an obstacle and say - nope, not gonna try. There are thousands of miles of roads capable of being driven on in a car. And there are trails that should only be driven by the most hard core of vehicles. As long as you know your rig and what you’re doing, you should be just fine.
 

Billiebob

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In the 1960s, when I grew up, no one had 4WD was AWD even a thing? Yet we ventured out on gravel roads which today are Interstates. There is plenty of technology to help us today yet I still use BackRoads Map Books which work after a nuclear strike or power failure. AWD, 4WD is another of those technologies but honestly would to do this with your new RAM....

 

OverlandRS

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I just wanted to update this with: I bought a little FWD import hatchback with a blown motor, I have wanted since I sold my last one. The model has a proven competition history in just about every form of motorsport there is class it fits into. So monster aftermarket support. I got it from a dealer and the owner had been a SCCA Solo2 autocross racer so came equipped with a LSD and the ABS, TC, SC, all already deactivated. This thing is unstoppable with the new long travel gravel spec coil over suspension and a skid plate, it just goes anywhere and this is with worn out second hand 15" rally gravel tires. There is no reason why you cant go overlanding with 2WD and sometimes you don't have to manage expectations like with this little 2019 Ford Fiesta ST rally hatch. I grew up with dunebuggies or sand rails and they were all 2WD with small HP engines never had any issues getting around in them.
 

ThundahBeagle

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I felt like I had to respond to this because I have a lot of experience in getting a 2wd truck in places where it never should be. Realisticly so long as you are not doing heavy rockcrawling type offroad, a small lift, larger tires, a locker, and some throttle management skills should get you anywhere a 4wd can go. Just remember a locked 2wd has the same drive capability as an open diff 4wd. Add a winch to the front for security And you should be able to get in-and-out of anywhere you need to go

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Not QUITE the same as 4x4, no. The 4x4 still has front wheel(s) running. But still very good. And if you are a "trails, fire roads and logging trails" kind of guy, I cant tell you how many logging trails my father, brother and I went on I. The 1980's with my fathers '78 Ford 2wd 8 ft bed. When the bed was empty, and over the course of the winter, we often laid down 2 or 3 sheets of plywood back there. Added weight but didnt take up much storage

You'll do pretty well even without the locker. And you will save fuel. Probably be able to tow more, too. Just pay attention what kind of terrain you're on and what the conditions you are in.
 
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ThundahBeagle

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We have a 2wd 99 F250 7.3 diesel Crew Cab short bed which is right at 7,800 without our camping stuff - water, food and other supplies.
For awhile I felt like we could get stuck on the asphalt next to the sand - kidding - but close.
We got some Treds which really helped getting unstuck! Then at 230,000 miles I got the diff rebuilt changed gearing from 3:73 to 4:10s and replaced the warn out posi with a Detroit Locker. What a Difference!!!!!!!

We still can get stuck in sand if I am not forceful on the throttle - but not like before. We have powered through some long stretches of sand and loss rock with no issues. I have to add that our SD has a 6" lift on it which helps a lot on mountain trails with holes and bigger rocks.

I would suggest always going with another rig and tow straps, winch and test your rigs capabilities now and then as in try something that looks like you will not make it (with in reason). Also what you are doing is learning how to get your rig to do what it needs to do to get through a spot (driver training).

Truck is/was stuck, it is sitting on treds waiting to see if we can back out with the trailer. Jacked it up filled the holes and let the rears down on the treds.

View attachment 49277
Love the retro "canned ham" paint job on the travel trailer
 
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OverlandRS

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Portland, OR, USA
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TJ
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LoMac
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In the 1960s, when I grew up, no one had 4WD was AWD even a thing? Yet we ventured out on gravel roads which today are Interstates. There is plenty of technology to help us today yet I still use BackRoads Map Books which work after a nuclear strike or power failure. AWD, 4WD is another of those technologies but honestly would to do this with your new RAM....

I was just telling my lady about the two brothers down around Arkansas or Texas that built oil rig vehicles out of old 4 door sedans on a custom ladder frame chassis with truck axles and drivetrains that were designed to do just this type of work as the video with the comfort of a typical small sedan they were a huge success and were featured on allot of TV shows but sadly they went out of business before the Internet became mainstream.

I love all the old video clips of primitive, vintage cars doing things we now consider only possible with "High Clearance, Full Time 4WD".