Question for Overland Bound(ers)

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BEAR

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Hello Michael- And everyone else.

I've been watching you're videos for sometime now and your rig is amazing and very capable. I have noticed that you seem to be by yourself with the exception of your passengers. I saw your video on the inReach device but my question is what do you do if you run into trouble out there? What is your plan and to other overland bounders what is your plan if you get stuck, break down, need medical attention if you head out with just your rig? I'm a very spontaneous person and would like to just head out into the Sierras on a week day so I'm interested in what people have to say.
 
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expeditionnorth

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make sure you have all the essentials & even a survival kit ~ shelter, food & water

2 is one, 1 is none philosophy

aside from the in-reach...

I carry a full tool box, spare rig parts, assorted nuts/bolts, hoses/belts etc

anything to lessen my odds
 

Robert OB 33/48

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Hello Barron,

Well, most of the time, we, the Dragonriders Travel group, are doing things together. So, there is always a back up. But, going on holidays through Europe, we do a lot on our own.
Then we have some golden rules about safety.
1. Think before you drive.
2. Get out and walk and have a good look.
3. Think again, talk with your navigator and discuss the aprouch.
4. Dont go to your limit.
5. Bring spare parts, tools and recovery material with you.
6. VERY IMPORTANT..... Dont let your testostoron get the lead. Stay sensible. You have to get home with your Rig.
7. Have some food and water with you.
8. First Aid kit with you.
9. AND.... When in doubt, dont do it.

Well that way we mostly are safe. hehehe. And luckely we have most of the time friends with us to recover us.

Greetings from Robert
 

dylanmorse

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Robert makes some excellent points above... That last point in particular. If you have a nagging gut feeling - don't attempt it.

The Boy Scouts motto is "Be Prepared" - basically, apply that to everything you do.
 

Inmused

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The principle of conscious dynamic risk assessment is paramount when off road. Knowing limits of vehicle dynamics/capability, driver & spotter skill and effects of terrain/weather all come to play at every stage of a journey.

However, the very nature of the journey will lead to repair and recovery situations.  Being prepared for a range of scenarios is important as stated above.

One of the scenarios that I see many NOT preparing for is the need to abandon ones vehicle.  I recently had to do this, but fortunately I was on 45min walk from a pick up point.  I had good hiking boots, warm clothes, water/food and light (it was pitch black at the time).  I see many going bush with very little preparation for this.  Having a bag you can grab in the case of a roll-over or fire is, I feel, basic off-road preparation.
  • Good day pack
  • water & food
  • good boots
  • warm/waterproof/windproof shell or jacket
  • Light source
  • Fire starting ability
  • compact tarp for shelter
  • knife
  • communication equipment (see below)
  • first aid
The extent of this kit depends on how far from civilisation you are.  Local tracks or in the middle of the outback require different levels of survival skills and materials. But the capability to survive without your vehicle (on foot) for all in the vehicle should not be underestimated.

Communication equipment is the interesting one here.  And it depends on you location and remoteness as to what your needs are.  In my local tracks I carry my phone on me and not on the dash for this purpose (there is reception).  I might have a 2w UHF radio in the  bag, but I have repeater towers to rely on for distance.  I am looking into a Spot device for more extensive overlanding to compliment the other too.

The most basic form of communication is  to let someone know where you are and when you will next check in. This is important for me as I travel alone most of the time.
 

FirewallPhotography

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Because of this and another post, I went out an bought an InReach.  Too often I'm out of cellular range which also impact scrolling maps on the iPad.  The InReach syncs to the iPad and I now use its maps.

Equipment wise I'm pretty well stocked, though I use a checklist each time cuz' I always seem to forget something. (last time it was radios for hiking).

I have often toyed with the idea of a mountain bike to ride out toward help.  Anyone else use this method?
 

BEAR

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16481 said:
Because of this and another post, I went out an bought an InReach. Too often I’m out of cellular range which also impact scrolling maps on the iPad. The InReach syncs to the iPad and I now use its maps. Equipment wise I’m pretty well stocked, though I use a checklist each time cuz’ I always seem to forget something. (last time it was radios for hiking). I have often toyed with the idea of a mountain bike to ride out toward help. Anyone else use this method?
How do you like that set up with the InReach and Ipad? I'm thinking about doing the same thing after seeing Michaels post. Could you post some pictures?
 

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On many occasions I would get into debates on some forums I used to belong to, about "going out alone".  My wife and I have been going it alone for over 20 years. However, that is only in the lower 48. We would never go it alone in the truly remote regions of North America, ( ie Alaska/Canada or Mexico) Having clarified that, we are also prepared to walk away from our rig if absolutely necessary, as we carry all of our back-pack gear with us. Of course we go in with no less than 2 weeks of food, 30+ gallons of water, H2O purifier, tools, a simple safety kit, an extreme safety kit, extraction gear, and last but not least ------common sense------    we are currently in the planning stages of a month or two long tour of the southwest beginning in late February. We've cobbled together some excellent gear, maximized our stowage capacity, ( take what you need, need what you take ) .... The only other things we need to invest in would be , a new starter, a new alternator and a PLB device,  just in case we wouldn't be able to walk back..
 

FirewallPhotography

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I like it allot.  The offering of street, satellite and topo maps is great for street, trying to get into a spot and of course climbing those hills.  I'm on the road for work - I'll send a couple shots next week.
 

FirewallPhotography

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If you come by Vegas, send me an email and I can recommend/show you some great spots to camp and enjoy the non-neon parts of the valley.
 

Inmused

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17128 said:
On many occasions I would get into debates on some forums I used to belong to, about “going out alone”. My wife and I have been going it alone for over 20 years. However, that is only in the lower 48. We would never go it alone in the truly remote regions of North America, ( ie Alaska/Canada or Mexico) Having clarified that, we are also prepared to walk away from our rig if absolutely necessary, as we carry all of our back-pack gear with us. Of course we go in with no less than 2 weeks of food, 30+ gallons of water, H2O purifier, tools, a simple safety kit, an extreme safety kit, extraction gear, and last but not least ——common sense—— we are currently in the planning stages of a month or two long tour of the southwest beginning in late February. We’ve cobbled together some excellent gear, maximized our stowage capacity, ( take what you need, need what you take ) …. The only other things we need to invest in would be , a new starter, a new alternator and a PLB device, just in case we wouldn’t be able to walk back..
Sounds like you are well prepared to go it alone.  Experience, common sense, well chosen gear and the preparedness for contingency will take you to spectacular places AND back again.
 

FirewallPhotography

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Here's a shot of the H-1 driver (cockpit).  I'm still a guy.

Ram Mounts do not make a mount specific for the inReach so I'm going to give it a little time before purchasing something.  Clipping it on the iPad works for now while street driving.  Off road, I just put it in a cup holder.
 

BEAR

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Nice Hummer, it reminds me of my old one. Thanks for the pic. I think I'll pull the trigger and get that set up. I've got to get my old Ipad cleared off and running faster though.