I have 3 options. Which should I start with? | OVERLAND BOUND COMMUNITY

I have 3 options. Which should I start with?

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TrippinStfflr

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Advocate II

854
Rock Island, TN, USA
First Name
Jeremiah
Last Name
Stiffler
I have 3 separate rigs I could start to build up. I want to hear your advice.
I'll start by describing the type of Overlanding I'd like to do and a little about myself for reference.
I live in Middle Tennessee. My wife and I were full time Rvers for a few years but decided to settle in Tennessee and start building a homestead. I work offshore so I have long hitches at home. Usually a month at a time. Although I now have the responsibilities of a homestead, I cant seem to shake that travel bug and can't help but think about all the places I couldnt go with a 30ft trailer in tow. I'd like to do short local trips to get my systems dialed in until I can venture off onto some many day trips out west and up north. I aint rich so budget is always a concern. I'm pretty mechanically enclined but haven't been able to build my tool collection back up after having to sell everything while we traveled. Can't weld but will learn soon. I'm not afraid of ground tent or hammock camping. I'd like a drawer kit for a fridge and kitchen set up. I'd like to start off with easy trails and work my way into mildly technical stuff but mostly just get the hell off the concrete.

Now I'll fill you in on my available options. All of which are clean slates.

1. 2017 F250 XLT Premium Superduty 4x4 6.7l diesel. Diamondback bed cover. Factory rear lockers. 35in Ko2. No lift. No scratches...
This was my tow vehicle when we traveled. Hellacious amounts of room and payload but I'd need to keep it able to tow my equipment trailer and travel trailer if need be.

2. 1990 4runner 3.0l 4x4. 31in Ko2. Absolutely bone stock and in great shape. It's my putt around town car. Found this while we were traveling through Washington state and couldn't pass it up. I love this truck so much but would be willing to sell it to fund the other project. Mechanically it's pretty damn sound. It's gonna need a clutch and the A/C doesn't work but its a great vehicle. Well over 200k miles on what I assume is the original engine.

3. 2021 4runner TRD offroad premium. Still waiting till the 27th for delivery. This will be my wife's daily driver/work vehicle. I probably wont be able to do anything drastic to it for a couple more years so this would be a really slow build.

So my question is....which one should I start to build out? The haul everything Superduty? The 3.slow? Or God's gift to offroad premium?
Let me hear your advice...please.
 

MMc

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Why don't you guys try both of your rides, leave the new at home. Take a couple of trips with both and figure out what you like best. I don't camp small anymore. I like to have my comforts and room. I give up some of the place to go for comfort. I surf, kayak, fish, and explore, my truck is a 4 door 8' bed Ram 2500 4X4.I have a bitchen camp if I am posting up to play. Everything is a trade off, you need to figure what work for both of you. Get out there and figure it out!
 

ThundahBeagle

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Massachusetts
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0

I'd leave the 2021 Toyota 4RUNNER out of it, even thought it's a great option. Reason being its brand new so has a warranty and needs to be your wife's daily driver.

The venerable '90 4Runner sounds like a great vehicle to use as your daily. I'm a big fan of those, really cool. If its stock, it's a classic. If it's a 90, its probably in need of a lot of maintenance. I'd maintain it as is. Thought it could be great on mid technical trails.

The Ford seems to offer the most advantages. Its tow-ready if you want to pull a teardrop trailer. It's a 250 if you was to use a slide in camper. You could simply put a Leer shell over the bed and sleep in there. Has a rear locker. Lots of room, bed cover, fuel economy of a diesel. Its downside is size if you want to run technical trails

You do mention mildly technical trails. You could just keep the newer 2 vehicles for daily and for tow duty, and soup up that 90 4Runner and have a blast.

I don't think I've been as much help as I set out to be.
 

TrippinStfflr

Rank III

Advocate II

854
Rock Island, TN, USA
First Name
Jeremiah
Last Name
Stiffler
I'd leave the 2021 Toyota 4RUNNER out of it, even thought it's a great option. Reason being its brand new so has a warranty and needs to be your wife's daily driver.

The venerable '90 4Runner sounds like a great vehicle to use as your daily. I'm a big fan of those, really cool. If its stock, it's a classic. If it's a 90, its probably in need of a lot of maintenance. I'd maintain it as is. Thought it could be great on mid technical trails.

The Ford seems to offer the most advantages. Its tow-ready if you want to pull a teardrop trailer. It's a 250 if you was to use a slide in camper. You could simply put a Leer shell over the bed and sleep in there. Has a rear locker. Lots of room, bed cover, fuel economy of a diesel. Its downside is size if you want to run technical trails

You do mention mildly technical trails. You could just keep the newer 2 vehicles for daily and for tow duty, and soup up that 90 4Runner and have a blast.

I don't think I've been as much help as I set out to be.
No you been plenty of help and thanks for the response. I pretty much considered everything you said.
Another disadvantage of the F250 is the cost of aftermarket parts. Pretty much double what you'd pay for a Toyota.

After thinking more about this, it really only comes down to the F250 and the 2nd gen. I cant wait 3 years for my warranty to expire to start doing lifts and regearing on the 5th gen. And the good thing is, by the time I'm ready for the 5th gen, I'll have a good idea of what I really want to do with it.

I think its gonna be the F250 for long hauls across the county. I've already done some sand driving in Nevada and Oregon in it and had a blast. Only minor dirt trails in California but they were pretty open easy trails.

I think the 2nd gen might become a local technical trails truck and I can use the 250 to haul it longer distances if I wanna do further treks.
The 2nd gen runs great. It's got all new suspension(stock) new breaks, cv axles,new radiator, fixed a few minor oil leaks(still has a rear main leak that will get fixed when I do the clutch) and the body is very straight.

Thanks for the help
 

kunstmilch

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Just my 10 cents (due to inflation and all) Id either go with the 90 4runner (lots of availability and not expensive per se). Or the ford if youre thinking a bit more comfortable you could add a camper on the back and start with tires and suspension (make sure to figure out all the changes you want to do before changing suspension!) then you'd have something closer to a mini RV that resembles some of the smaller earth roamers, but the 4runner would possibly get you into more trails.
 

MidOH

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What trails?

Highway, dirt roads, and maybe the TAT, F250 all the way.
 

MOAK

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The 90 4 runner without question. You mentioned between the lines, that you wanted to get way off grid and that towing a 20ft trailer kept you from getting very far off grid. The 250 has its place and is a great platform, however, I think you’ll become a bit frustrated with the limitations of a large truck, versus the limitless unmaintained high clearance 4x4 roads that a mildly built 4Runner is capable of traversing. Good luck
 
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Okierover

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I think this is pretty obvious. The Mrs. is not gonna dig you taking her rig on a week long trip to where ever without her and getting it stinky and dirty and scratched.
I go out in my F150 Super Cab. Its nice having all the luxury. But is my daily driver and is really too big for the really adventurous stuff. Rallies in off-road parks, etc...So the F250 is out IMHO.
The 1990 is tailor-made for overland. No one is out if you break it. And it sounds like you already have it setup as a toy.
Looking forward to pictures.
 

smlobx

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My vote would be the Super Duty.

I have a ‘16 F-350 and bought a Hallmark Everest expedition camper (www.hallmarkrv.com) to take for longer trips. Last year we did a 15K mile trip from VA to Alaska and back. It took us almost 3 months and was worth every second. My wife loves traveling in it. You also have the ability to tow anything else you may want behind it…

58C4AD08-4F9A-4E3D-82CD-2CD2391FDE1E.jpeg9C7DDEC0-4C4E-463E-B788-C3F4AE38E158.jpeg58C4AD08-4F9A-4E3D-82CD-2CD2391FDE1E.jpeg9C7DDEC0-4C4E-463E-B788-C3F4AE38E158.jpeg
 

North American Sojourner

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No you been plenty of help and thanks for the response. I pretty much considered everything you said.
Another disadvantage of the F250 is the cost of aftermarket parts. Pretty much double what you'd pay for a Toyota.

After thinking more about this, it really only comes down to the F250 and the 2nd gen. I cant wait 3 years for my warranty to expire to start doing lifts and regearing on the 5th gen. And the good thing is, by the time I'm ready for the 5th gen, I'll have a good idea of what I really want to do with it.

I think its gonna be the F250 for long hauls across the county. I've already done some sand driving in Nevada and Oregon in it and had a blast. Only minor dirt trails in California but they were pretty open easy trails.

I think the 2nd gen might become a local technical trails truck and I can use the 250 to haul it longer distances if I wanna do further treks.
The 2nd gen runs great. It's got all new suspension(stock) new breaks, cv axles,new radiator, fixed a few minor oil leaks(still has a rear main leak that will get fixed when I do the clutch) and the body is very straight.

Thanks for the help
You're on to something here. The 3rd gen for local trips, and gear up the F250 for the longer. (yeah, I have one myself LOL). I'm trying to decide pull behind, or slide it for my F250. We're too old to bed down in the tents or back of the truck with a cap. Toyota won't pull much at all and I've done the research. I'm coming from Tacoma World, and those fella's will lie to ya about trailers...ahahahahahahaha. There is a thread over there that gets pretty honest on the trailer hauling capabilities. I'm all for your idea.
Zim
 

MidOH

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A challenger appears:


Setup the old 4runner hardcore for local use, and then trailer it to MOAB.
 
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TrippinStfflr

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854
Rock Island, TN, USA
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Jeremiah
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No you been plenty of help and thanks for the response. I pretty much considered everything you said.
Another disadvantage of the F250 is the cost of aftermarket parts. Pretty much double what you'd pay for a Toyota.

After thinking more about this, it really only comes down to the F250 and the 2nd gen. I cant wait 3 years for my warranty to expire to start doing lifts and regearing on the 5th gen. And the good thing is, by the time I'm ready for the 5th gen, I'll have a good idea of what I really want to do with it.

I think its gonna be the F250 for long hauls across the county. I've already done some sand driving in Nevada and Oregon in it and had a blast. Only minor dirt trails in California but they were pretty open easy trails.

I think the 2nd gen might become a local technical trails truck and I can use the 250 to haul it longer distances if I wanna do further treks.
The 2nd gen runs great. It's got all new suspension(stock) new breaks, cv axles,new radiator, fixed a few minor oil leaks(still has a rear main leak that will get fixed when I do the clutch) and the body is very straight.

Thanks for the help
You're on to something here. The 3rd gen for local trips, and gear up the F250 for the longer. (yeah, I have one myself LOL). I'm trying to decide pull behind, or slide it for my F250. We're too old to bed down in the tents or back of the truck with a cap. Toyota won't pull much at all and I've done the research. I'm coming from Tacoma World, and those fella's will lie to ya about trailers...ahahahahahahaha. There is a thread over there that gets pretty honest on the trailer hauling capabilities. I'm all for your idea.
Zim
I've literally been looking at off road campers all day. Man, it's crazy that you can spend twice as much for a little teardrop than I paid for a 30ft bumper pull. And it's not much more expensive to do a flat bed swap with a slide on camper.
I think I'll do the trailer option and see if I can rent it out when I'm not using it.
 

North American Sojourner

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I've literally been looking at off road campers all day. Man, it's crazy that you can spend twice as much for a little teardrop than I paid for a 30ft bumper pull. And it's not much more expensive to do a flat bed swap with a slide on camper.
I think I'll do the trailer option and see if I can rent it out when I'm not using it.
I'm leaning towards a popup slide in like a palimino or 4wheel camper type. Low profile and still able to access it on the road without the top up. (gotta pee everynow and then LOL) My 250 would handle it like a dream and still would be able to access most of the trails. (except the cliff hangers). I could always pull a small trailer and side by side for the off road excursions.
Zim
 

MidOH

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The trick is that truck is a long bed, and the camper is a zero overhang model. So you can tow quite a bit.

The regular campers that overhang down past over the rear bumper, can only tow a small utility trailer. Dirt bikes, jet skies, etc. Towing with a 4' extension sucks. So keep that in mind.

My shortbed F250 would be stuck with a normal overhang type camper. But all I'll ever tow, with that setup, would be a lightweight tandem axle open utility trailer. For the Gen, kayaks, 2nd spare, etc.
 

Nickel

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Everything is a trade off, you need to figure what work for both of you. Get out there and figure it out!
I love this statement. So true. In contrast to you, I am a minimalist and like easy, quick setup and don't like to bring a lot of extras. My wife likes the extras all the way from what we bring to what we eat be bug repellents to screened in areas to sun shades. It is a difficult balance. I prefer to go solo!
 
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Okierover

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I love this statement. So true. In contrast to you, I am a minimalist and like easy, quick setup and don't like to bring a lot of extras. My wife likes the extras al the way from what we bring to what we eat. It is a difficult balance. I prefer to go solo!
I'm with Nickel. I try to keep my load out simple. I even sleep in my vehicle so I don't need a tent.
It may take a few trips to sort out your kit. But you won't sort it in the driveway. Until you actually start going out you won't know what is superfluous.
 

Alanymarce

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Fill the 1990 4Runner with fuel and start travelling. Don't spend anything on it - use the money for fuel. As you travel you'll find you need stuff - something on which to cook, something for which to eat, something from which to drink (this one's important). No reason to do anything other than maintain it.
 
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Nickel

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Fill the 1990 4Runner with fuel and start travelling. Don't spend anything on it - use the money for fuel. As you travel you'll find you need stuff - something on which to cook, something for which to eat, something from which to drink (this one's important). No reason to do anything other than maintain it.
If the OP has confidence in the mechanical stability of the 1990 4Runner I would agree with this strategy.