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chuckoverland

Rank VI
Member

Influencer II

2,808
Spokane, WA
Member #

3367

It allows me to get away from this adulting thing. Camping takes me back to some of the best memories from childhood, when the world wasnt insane (to me anyways)
Also, anywhere i can go without cell service i am all over.
 
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Speric

Rank I
Member

Contributor I

233
Santa Rosa, CA, USA
Member #

18037

Curiosity. I've always been curious about new places, and new vistas. I didn't grow up camping or being "outdoorsy", but got into mountain biking when I was a teen and used to explore various new hiking and deer trails in the sierras all the time and occasionally discovering an old abandoned mine or swimming hole. Did some backing packing in my 20's, got back into mountainbiking in my 30's, and now I'm finding I just can't ride as far and as out back as I used to as I head towards my 50s, but still want to get out there like I used to. Driving there seems to fit. The woods and mountains have always been a place to recoup.
 

Viking1204

Rank V
Member

Pathfinder I

1,798
Fort Walton Beach, FL
First Name
Scott
Last Name
S
Member #

17968

I deer hunt on a 2000 acre lease of pine trees and swamp. There is no camp house, running water, or power at our campsite. We have lots of Bears who tear down our feeders on a regular basis until we get them high enough they can't reach them. I'd like to hunt for a week at a time but I'm not going to stay there in a ground tent. I started researching Rooftop Tents via Google searches and that lead me here. My love of the outdoors, camping, exploring new areas, and meeting new like minded people is why I singed up and became a member. I've always had a love of the great outdoors growing up in SE Minnesota and playing in the hills around the Mississippi river near Winona, MN! My plan once I get my rig all setup with a RTT is to take a trip out West, it's one area of the country I haven't been to yet. Actually there are a lot of places I haven't been to yet so God willing once I retire I'll be able to have the means to travel and explorer as much of this beautiful country as I can! I've learned a ton here that will help me on my future adventures and for that I am thankful for all the members here!
 
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rickmolloy

Rank I
Member

Member I

233
Redmond, WA 98052, USA
First Name
Rick
Last Name
Molloy
Member #

18870

It came on really slowly. In 1992 my boss got a new Range Rover classic and I totally didn’t get it or why, I thought they were ugly.

I got my own RR classic in 2004 and had it for a few years until it was really impractical.

Keep in mind I didn’t really take it out much, I did a few long trips in it and thought a bit about overlanding it then. But I didn’t know it was overlanding, just that I wanted to drive around outside and explore and I didn’t really want to do mudding or off-roading like my friends with their 4x4s did...

More simply, the more time I spend inside my office all day the more I want to slow down get out and explore and get away from it all and experience the journey and destination, particularly now before it gets too civilized which I’m sure will happen in the next 20-30 years.
 

OtherOrb

Rank V
Member

Enthusiast II

1,584
Flagstaff, AZ
First Name
Moses
Last Name
H
Member #

18698

Ham Callsign
KE7QIF
Because this is where I've always been.

I grew up off-grid; no electricity, no running water, no phone, none of that.

Now, I explore planets for a living, including the lovely one under my feet.

This is the truck I learned to drive on: 1966 C60 2-ton flatbed (that's my dad on the far right).
101759

This is the first vehicle I remember being in. It's a hand-built, horse-drawn wagon/truck-drawn trailer. We had horses draw it for general use but it also had a hitch for hooking to a truck so we could use it for wood cutting. That's my older sister in the foreground.
101760
 

Steve in Roanoke VA

Rank V
Member

Pathfinder I

1,479
Roanoke VA
Member #

17402

What a loaded question!! And a very good one. I overland, therefore I am.
Like some of the others, I grew up many moons ago in Boy Scouts, became an Eagle scout, Backpacked, Canoed, Climbed, etc.
But what that really did was to re-enforce the love of outdoors that I have always had. Overlanding encourages me to connect with nature, and to share it with others.
I find myself truly enjoying getting out in nature and getting by with the least amount of "stuff" that is needed.
But the best short answer I have seen is:
"ADVENTURE IS NECESSARY"
 
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PCO6

Rank V
Member

Pathfinder I

1,798
Newmarket, Ontario
Member #

12534

View attachment 100990 As a Boy Scout in the 70's - I read several of Colin Fletcher's books. The Complete Walker is still in my bookcase. Boy Scout's taught me to Camp, Hike, Flyfish, Tie Knots, etc. It's the Boy Scouts that taught me to read Maps, plan Multi-week trips to Philmont, Charles L. Sommers Canoe Base. There isn't a trail in the Grand Canyon - that I haven't hiked at least once. Many trails - multi times - Rim-to-Rim-to-Rim, Hermits, Havasupai, Antelope Canyon, Rainbow Bridge, American Falls, Paria Canyon, etc. Rock and Mountain Climbing, bagging peaks. Revisiting the steps of Jediah Smith, John Muir, Hemingway. That is why I explore the western states. . . David
I was a Boy Scout in the '60s and loved it. I came back to it as a Leader in the late '90s and '00s when my sons were of that age. I had a great time ... them not so much and they weren't alone. It's a different time now with a LOT more distractions than there used to be. If they wanted to tie knots they could probably do it with their thumbs only, assuming they'd put down their electronic devices. My wife has never been into camping or the outdoors in general. She is her late '50s and has decided to take it up ... sort of. I think I need to become a Scout leader again.
 
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Murphy Slaw

Rank V
Member

Pathfinder I

2,528
Southern Illinois
Member #

0838

I joined the Jeep Patriot Forum when my wife bought a Patriot, just to have the experience of other owners when issues popped up.

Someone there linked this place and I joined and bought the badge. I pop in for the pictures and great people and conversations. Not much into extreme 4 wheeling or huge lifts and tires, but have been all over the U.S.A. in many different rigs and truly enjoy exploring and seeing different places.
 

EricGagne

Rank V
Member

Contributor III

1,402
Lachine, Montreal, QC, Canada
First Name
Eric
Last Name
Gagne
Member #

19052

I have done a few trips in the USA but I mostly do my overlanding in Quebec, right here in my own backyard.

I overland because there is nothing I enjoy more than driving logging roads and discovering more and more of my beautiful province. I like riding alone or with only 1 or 2 other vehicles, I am a bit of a solitarian which is another reason I like overlanding, you don't see crowds in the wilderness. Overlanding allows you to see and discover things you would probably never see or hear about in your lifetime if you had not gone on "that" trip.

That's why I do it.
 

Aaron Niemi

Rank V
Member

Pathfinder I

2,011
Spokane, WA
First Name
Aaron
Last Name
Niemi
Member #

11381

I love the anticipation of a trip, I love finding new places, I love how being in nature either driving through rough terrain or hiking keeps you present and out of your head. I like the camaraderie and the people and having a shared interest. And of course all the amazing sites, views, adventures and the memories and stories we create along the way.

What I like about OB specifically is how easy it makes it meet people that enjoy it as well. Making new friends, especially as an adult stuck in my own routines isn't always easy, so I'm thankful for that.
 

MOAK

Rank V
Member

Advocate II

2,566
Wernersville, PA, USA
First Name
Donald
Last Name
Diehl
Member #

0745

My wife and I "overland" to be alone with one another, with nothing in the way. No rat race, no phone, no tether to society, off grid. To be in and within our natural environment.

My inspiration came from a fourth grade teacher way back in 1963. Her husband had been killed in WWII. Her and two WWII widowed friends traveled all over the US utilizing a small van for travel and army surplus pup tents and gear. She also had a really good camera and the first week of class this little farm boy from N.E. Ohio had his socks blown off as she shared with us her entire slide show. Arches, before it was a NP, Grand Canyon, Tetons, Alaska, Mohave, Death Valley, Sequoia, Redwoods, Yosemite, the Smokies, Oregon, PNW, on and on, for an entire week. Then again in the 5th grade. Then she introduced me to Ansel Adams and John Muir. I couldn't get off that farm soon enough. By 1973 I was gone and, odd as it may sound, have been going ever since, If not physically, then in my mind. Currently planning, a back country tour of central PA, camping in Vermont, and another 6 week tour of the western US. We just keep going.
 

Laud

Rank VI
Member

Influencer II

2,642
Southeast Arlington TX
Member #

7010

Ham Callsign
-KG5QHC-
Because I am too old and out of shape to hike the mountains I used to as a kid. Plus, they have become to accessible to people and are getting overrun.
I enjoy following historical routes and imagining what it was like to have been in their shoes when I get to a natural obstacle. (Hole in the Rock) (Missouri River in the spring)
I have always had a love for the road (using the term loosely) and vehicles.
Have never been a fan of people in large numbers. Even less of a fan of people today. (Hence my short answers most of the time)
Today, I enjoy doing large trips with not a lot of vehicle kit. My rig is stock. Many have heard me say Food-Water-Shelter Now Go....this is what I do.
I understand we are loosing places to go every day due to multiple reasons, we don't get a second chance at TODAY. Gotta go see all the things now.