Who used Slumberjack Roadhouse Tarp and Tents

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Cberg1975

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New Mexico, USA
First Name
Chris
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Eisenberg
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Hello Gang,
As a Novice, I am working on my rig. I was curious to see your thoughts on the Slumberjack Roadhouse and tents they make.

I have a 2008 Ford Explorer Sport Trac and don't have the funds at the moment for a roof tent or trailer. So I thought that Slumberjack would be a good alternative until I can get some funds.

What are your thoughts and if you have pics please share.

Thanks
Cberg1975
 

Road

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Hey @Cberg1975 - I have the Slumberjack Roadhouse Tarp and like it, but have no experience with their tents or other products.

I purchased the Roadhouse Tarp to experiment with as quick temporary shelter for when I don't have my trailer along, and to supplement the coverage my trailer awning provides if do have it, but have a large group or want to set up shelter in two locations. I want to see how well I like it without van and trailer, as well, for camping with just my bike or canoe.

A couple caveats:
* Haven't had it setup in rain yet, so can't vouch for how well it sheds rain.
* Haven't used it as stand-alone yet, either, but plan on experimenting with that this summer. I suspect I won't like the packed size if transporting on my bike, as it's a bit bulky for stowing in a pack or strapping to the back rack. The packed size will be fine for canoe camping.

I set it up on Padre this past Jan, attached to the rear of my van in some easy breezes.

What I like about ii:
- it can be configured a few different ways
- is easy to set up
- comes with two 8' poles, five segments each. If I recall correctly they are shock-corded, not adjustable
- includes reflective guylines and stakes, though I chose to use my OZTent stakes as easier. In sand you might want screw-in stakes as more stable
- all guypoints are reinforced
- packs nicely to a roll with poles in the middle and includes a carry sack for storage. Weighs 12.5 lbs (5.7 kilos)
- lifetime warranty

Not having used it more than the once on Padre, I can't vouch for the tarp's long-term durability, but it seems stout.

It is made of 68D polyester. Here's an interesting article on polyester vs nylon for tents, with a bit about 68D and 75D a ways down in the article. The Roadhouse Tarp has a 1200mm coating, though it's not clear if the coating is for water-resistance, water-proofing, or as fire retardant. I know some tent manufacturers are shying away from some coatings these days because of lack of standards and potential health hazards. Read the recent article on Wedge Campers at Expedition Portal for more on fabrics and coatings, if interested.

I see the Roadhouse Tarp is available on Slumberjack's amzn page for $20 less than it is on their site and still includes free shipping. In fact, they have all their products there, looks like, though I have not compared their other prices.

Here are some pics showing mine in use:
padre-roadhouse_1915-900.jpg
Set up as shelter at the rear of my van on Padre.

padre-roadhouse_1917-900.jpg
Closer view showing the 1" webbing with buckles secured to my wheels. I also attached that end with ball bungees to my rear roof rack.

padre-roadhouse_1924-900.jpg
If I were leaving this up in a stiffer breeze, I'd stake out the two points dangling by the poles so the sides flared a bit and so they wouldn't flap and flutter.

padre-roadhouse_1914-900.jpg
I wouldn't expect it to reflect heat like my trailer awning does, but it does provide shade.

I don't think it would be the best choice for regular use as overnight shelter. It's more of a temporary shade tarp and shelter. You might like their ground tent, the Slumber Shack 4 Person, that attaches to a vehicle like the tarp does but has an attached, enclosed, four-person tent.

Having spent around 500 nights out in the last two years, though, I can say I personally don't depend on a ground tent for primary sleeping quarters. A lot of places I stay I'd have to hunt more for a big enough flat and level spot for a ground tent than I do for either van or trailer. It's a lot easier and quicker to level the trailer than it is to find a good level flat spot for a tent.

All in all, I find the Roadhouse Tarp to be worth the 119.95 I paid for it. I like the construction and their products enough I think I might get their Illusion 1 Person Tent (a bivouac) or the 1 Person Contour Bivy for overnight bike and canoe trips.

You certainly don't have to have a trailer or rooftop tent to get out for some adventuring. I used and slept in just about every kind of vehicle imaginable before starting to use vans, then van and trailer.

Hope you find something that works well for you.
 
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Cberg1975

Rank I
Member

Member I

233
New Mexico, USA
First Name
Chris
Last Name
Eisenberg
Member #

18913

Hey @Cberg1975 - I have the Slumberjack Roadhouse Tarp and like it, but have no experience with their tents or other products.

I purchased the Roadhouse Tarp to experiment with as quick temporary shelter for when I don't have my trailer along, and to supplement the coverage my trailer awning provides if do have it, but have a large group or want to set up shelter in two locations. I want to see how well I like it without van and trailer, as well, for camping with just my bike or canoe.

A couple caveats:
* Haven't had it setup in rain yet, so can't vouch for how well it sheds rain.
* Haven't used it as stand-alone yet, either, but plan on experimenting with that this summer. I suspect I won't like the packed size if transporting on my bike, as it's a bit bulky for stowing in a pack or strapping to the back rack. The packed size will be fine for canoe camping.

I set it up on Padre this past Jan, attached to the rear of my van in some easy breezes.

What I like about ii:
- it can be configured a few different ways
- is easy to set up
- comes with two 8' poles, five segments each. If I recall correctly they are shock-corded, not adjustable
- includes reflective guylines and stakes, though I chose to use my OZTent stakes as easier. In sand you might want screw-in stakes as more stable
- all guypoints are reinforced
- packs nicely to a roll with poles in the middle and includes a carry sack for storage. Weighs 12.5 lbs (5.7 kilos)
- lifetime warranty

Not having used it more than the once on Padre, I can't vouch for the tarp's long-term durability, but it seems stout.

It is made of 68D polyester. Here's an interesting article on polyester vs nylon for tents, with a bit about 68D and 75D a ways down in the article. The Roadhouse Tarp has a 1200mm coating, though it's not clear if the coating is for water-resistance, water-proofing, or as fire retardant. I know some tent manufacturers are shying away from some coatings these days because of lack of standards and potential health hazards. Read the recent article on Wedge Campers at Expedition Portal for more on fabrics and coatings, if interested.

I see the Roadhouse Tarp is available on Slumberjack's amzn page for $20 less than it is on their site and still includes free shipping. In fact, they have all their products there, looks like, though I have not compared their other prices.

Here are some pics showing mine in use:
View attachment 108251
Set up as shelter at the rear of my van on Padre.

View attachment 108252
Closer view showing the 1" webbing with buckles secured to my wheels. I also attached that end with ball bungees to my rear roof rack.

View attachment 108253
If I were leaving this up in a stiffer breeze, I'd stake out the two points dangling by the poles so the sides flared a bit and so they wouldn't flap and flutter.

View attachment 108250
I wouldn't expect it to reflect heat like my trailer awning does, but it does provide shade.

I don't think it would be the best choice for regular use as overnight shelter. It's more of a temporary shade tarp and shelter. You might like their ground tent, the Slumber Shack 4 Person, that attaches to a vehicle like the tarp does but has an attached, enclosed, four-person tent.

Having spent around 500 nights out in the last two years, though, I can say I personally don't depend on a ground tent for primary sleeping quarters. A lot of places I stay I'd have to hunt more for a big enough flat and level spot for a ground tent than I do for either van or trailer. It's a lot easier and quicker to level the trailer than it is to find a good level flat spot for a tent.

All in all, I find the Roadhouse Tarp to be worth the 119.95 I paid for it. I like the construction and their products enough I think I might get their Illusion 1 Person Tent (a bivouac) or the 1 Person Contour Bivy for overnight bike and canoe trips.

You certainly don't have to have a trailer or rooftop tent to get out for some adventuring. I used and slept in just about every kind of vehicle imaginable before starting to use vans, then van and trailer.

Hope you find something that works well for you.
Very cool, thanks for the pics and in-depth review!!
 
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