What knives do you guys recommend?

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Life of Trevor

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I had a buck spitfire mini I used to Dailey for cooking and stuff. I’m wanting to get into like bushcraft and stuff and I lost my pocket knife. I was looking into an esee 3 for a Dailey. I want something small and sturdy for small jobs. Any suggestions out there? Just curious
 

Flipper

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I had a buck spitfire mini I used to Dailey for cooking and stuff. I’m wanting to get into like bushcraft and stuff and I lost my pocket knife. I was looking into an esee 3 for a Dailey. I want something small and sturdy for small jobs. Any suggestions out there? Just curious
I carry an ESEE 3 while camping/hiking, very high quality knife. It replaced my 1916 pat. Marble Woodsman my Grandfather gave me when I was a little kid for fear of losing or damaging it has retired and in the safe. The 3 is similar in size. I was considering the 4 but imo it gets in the large chopper/survival class and a little too large for everyday camping chores for me. Also honorable mention to CRKT Siwi that mounts inverted on my backpack strap. The handle is is formed that your fingers fit “into” it for a very secure grip. Smaller than the 3 but a very solid knife with a unique sheath for multiple wearing options. Check out Smoky Mtn. Knife Works.93458E93-C391-4B08-B57D-70EC13E5EA6D.jpeg
 
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Wandering_Wolverine

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For a fixed blade you are on the right track with the ESEE. They are well made, have good ergonomics, and are a great value. For a step up in materials take a look at Bradford knives. I’m fond of the Bradford 4.5 & 5.5 as well as the ESEE line in a similar size. Lastly, I’d recommend taking a look at Bark River Knives. They are another step up in price from the Bradfords but are very popular in the Bushcraft community and are made in my home state of Michigan.

For a folder I always recommend the Spyderco Paramilitary 2. It’s simply a great knife and is available in many different steels. I always thought Spyderco made ugly weird knives and resisted trying them. Don’t let the ugliness fool you, the Para 2 has great blade geometry and ergonomics. I’ve always been a Benchmade fan but their knives simply don’t cut as well as my Spydercos So I’m a convert.
 

Wandering_Wolverine

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I carry an ESEE 3 while camping/hiking, very high quality knife. It replaced my 1916 pat. applied Marble Woodsman my Grandfather gave me when I was a little kid for fear of losing or damaging it has retired and in the safe. The 3 is similar in size. I was considering the 4 but imo it gets in the large chopper/survival class and a little too large for everyday camping chores for me. Also honorable mention to CRKT Siwi that mounts inverted on my backpack strap. The handle is is formed that your fingers fit “into” it for a very secure grip. Smaller than the 3 but a very solid knife with a unique sheath for multiple wearing options. Check out Smoky Mtn. Knife Works.View attachment 184179
That Marbles is fantastic. I’m always on the hunt for a Marbles Ideal in good shape. Definitely hard to find!
 
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Trail_pilot

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I always have a mora companion or mora bushcraft black with me. I have been using the same knives in my kits for close to 10 years I believe and have had 0 issues. The companion I keep as a vehicle kit knife is stainless as it gets used less often and left in the vehicle, and the bushcraft black is a carbon blade that the edge has held up beautifully and I have only needed to give it a quick strop every once in a while to keep it shaving sharp. I have used the spine to start countless fires with a Ferro rod and batoned it through logs to make kindling and even though it's not a full tang knife nothing has come loose. It's comfortable and just plain works.
 

genocache

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I just don't find the jobs to warrant carrying a multi tool while camping. I carried one at work for years and it was handy there. My dailey is a 40 year old Buck 560 folder, usually in my pocket and always sharp. I have a couple of fixed blades, but rarely carry them, they are in the rig if I need them. One is a Becker Tactool; Becker Tac Tool It's a beast! does all thoses chopping, prying, splitting, cutting chores and at .250" thick, pretty darn indestructable. Then I have a small 4" fixed blade Gerber I'll carry on a hike from base camp.

Whatever you get make sure you keep it sharp.
 
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awesomezebra

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I rotate a benchmade barrage and griptilian in my pocket but I always keep a esee 3 in the truck, the esee is a decent fixed blade
 

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CRKT Firespark is my favourite EDC knife. Very cool mechanism and it looks slick as anything. I have a Kershaw Blur for more rough work, it has a tanto with a semi serrated edge. The sharpest pocket knife I own is my Higo no Kami, an amazing japanese knife that's baiscally a pocket katana. That one is a friction lock, though, so not for everyone. That's my knife when I dress fancy lol Here's the higo:Found_23802872_247047.jpg
 
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LONO100

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i carry a kershaw everyday and when I camp. They are light, I dont even notice it in my pocket and they have a very nice quick opening mechanism. They are pretty sharp, and last a long while. I tend to be clumsy and forgetful and have lost a few knives. The Kershaw knives are reaaonably priced so if I lose it (which I have done a few times), it doesn't break my wallet to replace it.

I also keep a gerber multi-tool in my truck, and I carry a leatherman skeletool on hikes.
 

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i carry a kershaw everyday and when I camp. They are light, I dont even notice it in my pocket and they have a very nice quick opening mechanism. They are pretty sharp, and last a long while. I tend to be clumsy and forgetful and have lost a few knives. The Kershaw knives are reaaonably priced so if I lose it (which I have done a few times), it doesn't break my wallet to replace it.

I also keep a gerber multi-tool in my truck, and I carry a leatherman skeletool on hikes.
I used to lose knives occasionally but I started taking the clips off and bending them a little more to add tension. When there is enough tension the pocket clip will make a positive “snick” as it slaps the scale when drawn. I started doing this over 15 years ago and haven’t lost one since. I carry a knife every day unless I’m flying commercial.

Traditionals are another matter. While I like the idea of them they usually fall out of my pocket if I sit on a couch or such so I don’t carry them often.
 
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LONO100

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I used to lose knives occasionally but I started taking the clips off and bending them a little more to add tension. When there is enough tension the pocket clip will make a positive “snick” as it slaps the scale when drawn. I started doing this over 15 years ago and haven’t lost one since. I carry a knife every day unless I’m flying commercial.

Traditionals are another matter. While I like the idea of them they usually fall out of my pocket if I sit on a couch or such so I don’t carry them often.
I also started doing this after losing a knife a while back and haven't lost one since as well! Another tip I can give is when you take the clip off to do the bend, wrap a small piece of gaffers tape around it. it adds extra grip and will also prevent the tip of the clip from scratching things like car doors or your kitchen cabinets if you walk to closely to one.
 

rgallant

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I have a carried the same a Buck 110 for 30 years does the job. I have a Gerber Mk II, I carry as well but that is situational.
 
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Wandering_Wolverine

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The most expensive one possible. It's the overland way!
I get the joke but there are actually a lot of expensive knives I don’t care for. Overly tactical blades with thick grinds are a pet peeve. When I want a knife I want something that cuts and when I want a pry bar I can definitely do better than a pocket knife.

I’ve learned that geometry is what makes a knife. Better steel allows for better geometry. If a knife maker is using high end steel but making blades with thick grinds look elsewhere. A high flat or convex grind allows for a blade with spine that is plenty stiff for strength but still tapers to a fine cutting edge.

Yep, I’m a knife snob but cost doesn’t have anything to do with it really.
 
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M Rose

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I get the joke but there are actually a lot of expensive knives I don’t care for. Overly tactical blades with thick grinds are a pet peeve. When I want a knife I want something that cuts and when I want a pry bar I can definitely do better than a pocket knife.

I’ve learned that geometry is what makes a knife. Better steel allows for better geometry. If a knife maker is using high end steel but making blades with thick grinds look elsewhere. A high flat or convex grind allows for a blade with spine that is plenty stiff for strength but still tapers to a fine cutting edge.

Yep, I’m a knife snob but cost doesn’t have anything to do with it really.
I’ve found some of my best knives are cheap hardware store brands... but like you said it’s because of the grind... I picked up a pen knife once for under $5.00... that was one of the best blades I have ever owned.

I saw Kershaw mentioned earlier... I had a great Kershaw made back in the 1950’s... I loved that knife, but now the name has gotten too big and quality really took a hit.