What is the Best overland Rig.

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rs680

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Hello i have been thinking about getting rid of my jeep and going into a new build. Do not get me wrong i love my jeep it has been good to me but it has had some issues that have not been resolved after almost a year. It is great for extreme trails and off road but i find myself not often on extreme trails. I like to tow my trailer and camp all over. I like to travel great distance across north america but i travel alone with my dog and we always try and take the back roads i just find i am never in extreme Jeep type trails. The jeep is hard on gas and does not tow that great. It is not the most comfortable on a 700 km day.

So i have been thinking maybe i should stop modding my jeep for over landing and maybe look at a Toyota or Chevy canyon diesel What do you all think.
 

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Rd62

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I think it really depends on where you want to go, how many people will be traveling with you, and how much gear do you need to carry.

If you are traveling internationally parts for a Toyota may be easier to source than a for a new Jeep. If traveling domestically with a family of five or pulling a camper or drop the payload of a full size domestic pickup may make more sense.
 

Anak

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The best overland rig is the one that you enjoy using.

I think far too many people are looking for something that will impress others. I think it is a mistake to spend money you don't have, buying things you don't really need in order to impress people you don't even know. But that seems to run against the grain of modern culture.

Your question brings to mind an answer I heard a pastor give to someone who asked which translation of the Bible is the best. He said "The one you will read." I think the same thing applies here.

If your issues with the Jeep are comfort and fuel economy, you might even consider making some changes to the Jeep. If you aren't using it on hard trails then perhaps you would find it to be a better vehicle if you were to switch to a smaller size of tire. That may help on the fuel economy side of the equation. I don't know what the comfort issues are, so it is harder to make any suggestions there. I know some folks who choose their vehicle based on how the seats fit them. But those are folks who have had back surgery(ies) and have real reasons for that priority. If your situation is along those lines then it is definitely worth making some changes. It could be a different vehicle, or it could just be new seats that fit you better.

I will say that comfort and fuel economy tend to run in opposite directions. My most comfortable vehicle is my Suburban, but it is by no means economical to drive. OTOH, that comfort tends to be worth the price on long drives, especially with three Varmints who generally seem bent on finding ways to kill each other. Comfortable natives are at least a little less restless.

Write out a list of YOUR priorities and figure out which vehicle best matches YOUR needs.
 

Jku Ben

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KEEP THE JEEP :) what is your biggest concern for getting rid of the Jeep ? Mpg ? Any vehicle you buy once loaded down with all of your necessities will lack the best performance of mpg’s.
 

PNW EXPLR

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It's the one that hold all your peeps,
lets you take all the crap you feel you need,
gets you over and through what's in front of you,
and then gets you back home safe!

Really it could be anything from a bicycle to an Earthromer!
 
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Dilldog

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In my opinion the best -insert thing here- is quite simply the thing that meets your needs, you are comfortable with and able to maintain.
Many people would say a Ford Escape is not the ideal overlanding rig, and for them it may not be. For me the Escape is a fine overlander, its capable enough to get me where I want to go but comfortable and economic enough to be a daily driver and interstate runner. Also very importantly it is what I have and it is paid for. Also worth thinking on is if you were to buy a new rig, what would your payment be like? Would the potential increase in payment costs outweigh your fuel costs? Would that keep you at home more due to increased financial strain?
I am a big fan of making what you have work. I tend to only replace things if it would cost more money one way or another to adapt than to replace.
 

J.W.

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I have a good friend who travels the country taking nature photos in a 10 year old 2 wheel drive Dodge pickup with a small trailer. He loves it and it’s a great setup for him. He has a manual come along and some recovery straps for getting stuck in the mud and that truck has never left him stranded. As others have state above, the best rig is what works for YOU.

I just got done with the process of switching vehicles and passed on the Wrangler for some of the same reasons you mention. It is an absolutely terrific vehicle but it just doesn’t suit my needs right now. My suggestion is to make a list.. a real list on paper... of your wants and needs in order of importance. Then go out and test drive everything you can. And make sure to drive things you don’t know much about. See what you like. Who knows, you might find out that your Jeep is what you want to stay with. Or you may find something that fits your needs better.

Great looking Jeep BTW. Good luck with the hunt.
 

Craig M

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To me, the more you get out there and camp, the more obvious it will become what vehicle and type of camping best suits your needs. And even then, your needs can change! Though there will always be some who prefer to choose the vehicle first, for the sake of the vehicle, then adapt their camping to what it can support.

I went from a crewcab F350 to a full size Bronco (when I added a trailer, later w/ rtt), then to a Suburban, currently a Jeep (finally sold the trailer), now I've started a van build, but that will be an addition. I still want the Jeep for certain trips, and sometimes will probably take it in tow, but the van will be great for longer distance trips, with more road driving. In the Jeep, we're either in the hammocks or one or another of our tents. None are very conducive to Walmart parking lots or rest stops.. :p

So on longer trips we will take the van and can cannonball to our initial destination and just crash as needed along the way.. That's the intent, anyway.

BTW.. I totally feel your pain with the Jeep issues.. I have had to do way more than I should have so far on this one, and there are always lingering issues. I actually think my water pump is starting to leak... I almost traded it in for a 4runner in Feb, when my transmission went.. But I ultimately deciced to keep it, and accept the flaws, because I love it so dang much. Haha
 

MidOH

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When I had a Jeep, I was often intensely jealous of the fullsize trucks that could roar by me on washboard sand roads, tow, had tons of room, didn't leak in the rain, had working AC, and could even handle a slide in camper.

I went fullsize Ford F250 this time around, being that most of my Jeep camping was fullsize friendly. Most of my Jeep wheeling was pinstriping a YJ, more Atv friendly than Jeep friendly. I'm keeping a list of cool spots that I come across that require a smaller ride. I'll be back to them in the future, with a Jeep.

Sadly, most of those tight spots around me are simple one day loops, not Overlanding. In that case, we can unload our bikes at our base camp, and have way more fun ''braaaaping'' across the trail than we ever did with the Jeep.

Small rides are great for tight trails, but lack a bit everywhere else. It's your call in which direction to bias your rig. Much of my camping, is regular camping. Which swings the needle further in favor of the fullsize.

This time around, I think I'll start over and be more like the Sprinter Van overland style. Fullsize truck, Suv, Suburban style. Barely off road, but still camping off road and having fun. My Suzuki gives me my hardcore off road fix, and the white haired, terrified look at the same time.
 
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Haminacan

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The best overland rig is the one you have, or the one you can afford. My Fiat 500 could be an overland rig if that is all I had, but Jeeps are not the be all end all. As my post last night said, I jumped off the Jeep bandwagon after almost 30 years and do not miss Jeep at all. My Ram 2500 Diesel will not make it down many of the trails my Jeeps could, but my Jeep never got anywhere close to 22mpg even empty. Almost 8000 pounds, lifted and 35's.20190612_193127.jpeg