OB Approved What is "Overlanding"?

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Michael

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Threads in this section will help you to become a self-reliant Overlander. Before we get started, what is "Overlanding"?

  1. Overlanding is: "Vehicle Dependent Travel". Nothing else.
  2. We will not further define "overlanding".
  3. Dependability depends on what the requirements of the trip are, and we take that very seriously.
  4. You are an Overlander: Overlanding is for everyone who has exploration and adventure in their heart, or, who need to be reinvigorated by connecting with nature. Nature is unforgiving. You must rise to a certain level of personal awareness to survive. Sound right? Overlanding is for you.
  5. Encourage uncomplicated ventures into the great outdoors. Don't over pack.
  6. Be prepared, and understand basic requirements. Question folks, to be sure they are aware of what is required. Don't assume.
  7. Share without reservation, trip locations, and information.
  8. It doesn't matter what you drive: The only requirement of an Overlander is that the vehicle serves the job required, safely.
  9. We do not care about make or model.
  10. We do not engage in "this is better than that" competitions.
  11. We DO give advice about how to make your vehicle ready for what you need. Share knowledge.
  12. Humility. "I don't know" is a great answer.
  13. We don’t brag about exploits.
  14. We seek answers from the community when we don’t know.
  15. We engage in the smallest of interactions.
  16. We have fun.
 
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RescueRangers

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I think the best example of Overlanding comes from 1920's Auto Camping when good roads (or any road), comfort stations, and campgrounds were few and far between. Our role models are Margaret and Edward Gehrke, they visited all of the National Parks (18 at the time) on roads we would consider challenging trails today. As much as we want to visit every National Park, we enjoy exploring the back roads connecting those parks, exploring the small towns along the way, and maybe meet some interesting people.
 

Steve

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As much as we want to visit every National Park, we enjoy exploring the back roads connecting those parks, exploring the small towns along the way, and maybe meet some interesting people.
That was some of the best part of our recent 43 day adventure. Finding out of the way places you heard about by asking locals. Sure, the parks are amazing, but so are the places in between, and sometimes, you're the only person there!
 

RescueRangers

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Our first trip was up the Appalachian Mountains along the Blue Ridge Parkway. I would not think the Blue Ridge would be a hot bed of Overland activity but we were surprised how many Overlanders we ran into, including a lady on her first solo dual sport expedition and Ron and Viv from Australia. We quickly found that meeting people was just as enjoyable as seeing new places, and it was at those little out of the way places where we met the best people.
 

Overland-Indiana

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Just watched this video again, I have to say again how true this is. It drives me insane when people or co-workers ask me "What is Overlanding?" then I tell them it is "Vehicle dependent travel" then they refuse to accept it and want me to further explain or define what it is. Overlanding is traveling to a destination using a vehicle (motorcycle, car, truck, suv,etc...doesn't matter). I made a promise to myself when i got into this "Overlaind lifestyle" to not judge another's form of transportation. It doesn't matter you drive a Jeep, Toyota, Ford, Chevy or a damn Ferrari.....it does not matter, if you have an explorer type mentality and the heart of an explorer then by definition you are an Overlander. This forum is both a blessing and a curse for me; it makes me want to get out and explore more but, due to work, time and money constraints that it is not possible to quench my thirst for adventure, which more than likely it could not be satisfied even if I was a millionaire and never had to work again and could just explore all the time. I think a true Overlander can never be satisfied and will always have that hunger to get out and see this beautiful place God has given us.
 

IronPercheron

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"...done building the truck..."
That's possible? [emoji12]

Sent from my HTC One_M8 using Tapatalk

ive learned recently that while you may finish building a dedicated off road truck ( my past experiences ) you wont ever get done tinkering with overlanding LOL

taking my first trip over Christmas! ill be off work 11 days.... gonna see what this old bronco's got.

i drive it daily, so mechanically she is sound. i have a spare carburetor (adjusted and ran it for a few weeks) , mechanical fuel pump, alternator and random other things i thought would be handy.... i like the old trucks. they are easier to diagnose and repair....

and....here....we......go
 

Irish Pirate

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That was some of the best part of our recent 43 day adventure. Finding out of the way places you heard about by asking locals. Sure, the parks are amazing, but so are the places in between, and sometimes, you're the only person there!
I work in a Tourist Trap (Key West). I coudn't agree with you more. Cruise ships drop off 12,000 people a day. Plus another 20,000 tourist already on the island. Some of the things they do are amazing and I highly recommend for everyone. But as a local, my favorite spots are the places the tourist dont know about. From beaches, to bars, to book stores. Those are the true hidden gems ... and I love sharing that secret.
 

Irish Pirate

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I think the best example of Overlanding comes from 1920's Auto Camping when good roads (or any road), comfort stations, and campgrounds were few and far between. Our role models are Margaret and Edward Gehrke, they visited all of the National Parks (18 at the time) on roads we would consider challenging trails today. As much as we want to visit every National Park, we enjoy exploring the back roads connecting those parks, exploring the small towns along the way, and maybe meet some interesting people.
I heard about this couple years ago ... and as young people often do I didn't really pay attention or give it much thought. Since that time I have completely forgotten about them. Thank you for the reference. I have been reading up and watching videos (the modern world is amazing). These two really are remarkable. Some of Margaret's journals are impressive. I see why they are your heroes. What an amazing couple they are.
 
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Philbobagginz

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This is perfect! I need to save this on my phone. I get asked all the time, especially since I have a big overland jeep gear sticker on the back.
 

Owencavlys

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This was one of my first stops here. So glad I found this video, M.

I've been through a lot of hobbies in my life. Picked things up and let them drop when I lost interest. The ones I kept in practice have all had some sort of community involved. Some of them have great communities, and some have just awful, judgmental, competitive communities — typically over superficial things like gear and vapid accomplishment.

I'm just getting into all this nonsense, but I like what I see in this community so far.
 

MarkW

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Not to toot my own horn or anything but an overlanding friend and I did an interview for a local magazine recently that just came out. Our goal was to educate people a bit on what overlanding is and give a better image of off roading than what the general public has. Didn't get everything across we wanted but I think she did a good job writing the article.

If anybody is interested in the online version which is easier to read. I have found it's a bit picky on browsers but heard Chrome works good with it.

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