Want to test the waters....

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Jcart01

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Contributor I

Hey folks. I have a 2010 GMC Sierra 1500 Z71 Crew cab short bed. It has Bilstein 5100s (lifted 1 1/4" in the front and can go a bit higher) and Falken AT3w E rated LT285/70 17s (Factory 17" alloy wheels). Truck is equipped with an engine and tranny cooler (6 speed auto w/ 4 low). Powerstop Z36 towing rotors and pads. The rear diff is an autolocking diff. With out spending a bunch of money (i really want the BDS 4" lift w/ fox coilovers) what trails can I feasibly do without breaking things? I'm wanting to test the waters of overlanding. I live in the Dallas, TX area but I'd love to take some weekend road trips.

What are some things I should consider doing to the rig? And what’s gonna break first lol?
 

Jaytperry89

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Navigator I

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Winston, OR, USA
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sound like you have a good setup already. depending on how well maintained your rig is changes what you should do. definately check your suspension out if your looking at 100000 plus miles, ball joints, tie rods, inspect your drivelines, look for leaks. after you feel that your rig is sound take her out and explore. lifting your rig wont hurt, larger tires are always nice, but dont forget to regear. as for the fox coil overs i like mine and highly recommend them
 

Jcart01

Rank 0

Contributor I

sound like you have a good setup already. depending on how well maintained your rig is changes what you should do. definately check your suspension out if your looking at 100000 plus miles, ball joints, tie rods, inspect your drivelines, look for leaks. after you feel that your rig is sound take her out and explore. lifting your rig wont hurt, larger tires are always nice, but dont forget to regear. as for the fox coil overs i like mine and highly recommend them
The lower control arms are the heaviest duty Moog. All fluids have been changed recently with Amsoil fluids. I guess now I just need to find somewhere to go! DFW doesn’t have much.
 
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grubworm

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Pathfinder I

1,685
Thibodaux, LA, USA
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mike
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c
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Use your rig then figure out what needs upgrading. This is how I was able to figure out what I needed vs wanted! And slowly I have been able to build a rig that does what I want too.
That's true...but for some odd reason, no matter what I buy, I'm ALWAYS just that one piece of gear away from having the "ultimate" set up...
 

kingofthehill29

Rank II

Advocate II

Hey folks. I have a 2010 GMC Sierra 1500 Z71 Crew cab short bed. It has Bilstein 5100s (lifted 1 1/4" in the front and can go a bit higher) and Falken AT3w E rated LT285/70 17s (Factory 17" alloy wheels). Truck is equipped with an engine and tranny cooler (6 speed auto w/ 4 low). Powerstop Z36 towing rotors and pads. The rear diff is an autolocking diff. With out spending a bunch of money (i really want the BDS 4" lift w/ fox coilovers) what trails can I feasibly do without breaking things? I'm wanting to test the waters of overlanding. I live in the Dallas, TX area but I'd love to take some weekend road trips.

What are some things I should consider doing to the rig? And what’s gonna break first lol?
There are a lot of mild trails in the National forests in southeastern Oklahoma that would be great for anyone with a 4x4 to do. And it is only about a 3 hour drive to get to the Broken Bow/Ouachita National forest area from DFW.
 
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Jcart01

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Contributor I

There are a lot of mild trails in the National forests in southeastern Oklahoma that would be great for anyone with a 4x4 to do. And it is only about a 3 hour drive to get to the Broken Bow/Ouachita National forest area from DFW.
I like that area too. Hochatown is nice. Would I need a winch for these trail?
 

kingofthehill29

Rank II

Advocate II

I like that area too. Hochatown is nice. Would I need a winch for these trail?
I didn’t need a winch when i was there. I sure there are places that might require a winch. My 4runner has a short wheelbase and I almost high centered it. If you have a long wheelbase you may run into an issue like that. Just make sure to walk a trail if it looks difficult to make sure it is something your willing to do. Most the trails i saw you could do in a stock 4x4.
 
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Boostpowered

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Pathfinder II

3,126
Wolfe City, TX, USA
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If your looking for some thick nasty mud its in east tx pick about any dirt rd after a good rain. If looking for rocks anywhere just west of ft worth and centeral tx, if ypur looking for actual offroad trails go to oklahoma or arkansas just drive around youll see trails everywhere. If you want to play in the sand there are dunes in oklahoma or you can go down to padre island or bolivar peninsula.
 

old_man

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Rather than a ton of money on a lift, start with the basics. Good recovery points, and undercarriage protection. Make sure you have good recovery equipment such as tow straps, and if depending on where you are, maybe traction boards or tire chains. Spend the rest on actually getting out and using it. I covered all the Rocky Mountains from Mexico to Canada in a 1973 2wd Chevy van with a fiberglass top I added. My wife and I put over 20k miles on it in 5 years in the mountains alone. Common sense, and skill outweigh gadgets. Skill comes from experience.

Everybody wants a cool looking rig, but where I go, nobody is around and going to see it. I built my rig for extreme rock crawling and have done it for decades. I have rolled it, flopped it and generally used the hell out of it. I have however always kept it looking nice and in tip top running order. Yes it has a lift and 35's but I did every hard trail in Colorado on 31's and a 3" lift back when that was considered extreme.
 
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Boostpowered

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Pathfinder II

3,126
Wolfe City, TX, USA
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Justin
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Davis
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Meet me at the lake palestine dam saturday, do some fishing/hang out and on way back to dfw ill take you to some spots that will test your truck
 

Jcart01

Rank 0

Contributor I

Rather than a ton of money on a lift, start with the basics. Good recovery points, and undercarriage protection. Make sure you have good recovery equipment such as tow straps, and if depending on where you are, maybe traction boards or tire chains. Spend the rest on actually getting out and using it. I covered all the Rocky Mountains from Mexico to Canada in a 1983 2wd Chevy van with a fiberglass top I added. My wife and I put over 20k miles on it in 5 years in the mountains alone. Common sense, and skill outweigh gadgets. Skill comes from experience.

Everybody wants a cool looking rig, but where I go, nobody is around and going to see it. I built my rig for extreme rock crawling and have done it for decades. I have rolled it, flopped it and generally used the hell out of it. I have however always kept it looking nice and in tip top running order. Yes it has a lift and 35's but I did every hard trail in Colorado on 31's and a 3" lift back when that was considered extreme.
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That sounds about right. I think I’ll start with Walmart special camping gear and go from there. Might take the nerd bars off too. But they might serve as some small amount of protection.
 

MetalMatt1776

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Lexington, OK, USA
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Linthicum
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There are a lot of mild trails in the National forests in southeastern Oklahoma that would be great for anyone with a 4x4 to do. And it is only about a 3 hour drive to get to the Broken Bow/Ouachita National forest area from DFW.
That's a fact. Many old logging roads and well traveled mild trails with great veiws. There are many around Clayton and Sardis Lake that, in decent weather, are passable by any good condition 4x4. You can spot a lot of them on Google earth. The ones S-SE of Clayton require a pass though.
 

Jcart01

Rank 0

Contributor I

That's a fact. Many old logging roads and well traveled mild trails with great veiws. There are many around Clayton and Sardis Lake that, in decent weather, are passable by any good condition 4x4. You can spot a lot of them on Google earth. The ones S-SE of Clayton require a pass though.
Can you camp in there?