Trying to decide on my next vehicle.

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MOAK

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I'm actually about to move from my colorado to a first gen xterra. Most of the time it's just me, so the smaller size isn't an issue. And I can get it cheap. That being said, if I was going to get something bigger, I t would probably be either a gx or land cruiser. Personally, I don't like spending a ton of coin on vehicles, so I'd probably go with an 80 series myself. But, that's just me. Everyone has different needs.
Interesting, my brother in law just bought a brand new Colorado,, way too much money IMO, nevertheless, I warned him he’d have buyers remorse within 2 years..
 

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Interesting, my brother in law just bought a brand new Colorado,, way too much money IMO, nevertheless, I warned him he’d have buyers remorse within 2 years..
I bought my 2017 colorado z71 2.8 duramax brand new in november of 2016. I havent had a single bit of buyers remorse. 26+ mpg on the highway 17+ city driving, it hauls everything ive asked( i farm so that means hay, tractor implements, tractors, livestock and other farm related stuff), it gets heavily offroaded atleast twice a month. The only complaint i would have was the stock height, stock tires and the front air dam that comes on it. I fixed all that and have nothing to hate about it.
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I can see buying a gasser zr2 and having buyers remorse since it cost way more than the z71 and doesnt really do anything better other than drive fast over whoops.
 
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Interesting, my brother in law just bought a brand new Colorado,, way too much money IMO, nevertheless, I warned him he’d have buyers remorse within 2 years..
I drive an 04 colorado. It's great on the road, and over forest service and very mild trails, and will keep is as my daily. I'm working on buying an 02 xterra as a dedicated overland rig.

The front end of the first gen Colorado's just isn't built to take the punishment I've been giving it, and I can't justify spending the money on a Toyota, or newer vehicle for overlanding. It just doesn't make sense to me. The 3.3L v6 in the first gen Xterras is a great motor, when maintained. And the drive train is damn near bullet proof. Much stronger than anything the Colorado has available. Not super great down the highway (19MPG TOPS), but I'm buying it to spend the vast majority of the rest of it's life off road, so that's not a deal breaker.
 
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MOAK

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Yes, those exterras still have a bit of trooper dna in them.. I have wondered aloud about the strength of the Chevy IFS.. As with most IFS vehicles the IFS itself is the weakest link
 
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reaver

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Yes, those exterras still have a bit of trooper dna in them.. I have wondered aloud about the strength of the Chevy IFS.. As with most IFS vehicles the IFS itself is the weakest link
Overall, it's been pretty good. It's mostly differential seals that I keep breaking. There are other weaknesses, such as a steering rack issue that needs reinforcing, and that a lift is super expensive. There's also no after market support, which makes building what I want to do crazy expensive. I also feel that an SUV would fit my overlanding needs much better than a truck would. Hence the reason I'm snagging a cheap Xterra. For normal truck use, daily driving, and occasional forest service roads, they're fantastic. Mine has a mild misfire, has 187k miles on it, and still gets 22mpg going down the freeway. Steering's still nice and tight.
 

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Yes, those exterras still have a bit of trooper dna in them.. I have wondered aloud about the strength of the Chevy IFS.. As with most IFS vehicles the IFS itself is the weakest link
Sure its a weak link if you are looking for extreme articulation like rock crawling but thats it. you can Unhook the swaybars while airing down and get a little more out of them, Otherwise a nice smooth ride. If you mean weak like flimsy im not seeing it the lower control arms are atleast an inch thick i know for sure they are fine sliding over rocks as long as you arent hitting them at high speed.
20190420_112318.jpg
 

tjZ06

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Cant argue with ronny.
In this case, you can.

I'm less than a minute into this, and it's already wildly inaccurate. I generally like Ronny's videos, but the way he's describing how a solid axle suspension works is way, way off. He's describing it as if there were a pivot-point in the dead-middle of the axle that is fixed to the chassis, so when one tire dropped down the other would have to go up an equal amount. That's simply not remotely true. Even the most basic leaf-spring suspension works far more eloquently than that, and when one tire moves down the other does not have to move up (though it will change the relative camber of that other tire). Link suspensions can be even more sophisticated, but there is NO solid axle suspension in existence that works the way he's describing.

His generalizations are also kind of ridiculous. Drive a WJ on really good fresh suspension (not a clapped-out example) and they handle nothing "like a boat." Then he gets into handling and again, implies that a solid axle works completely differently than it does. Yes, in general an IFS rig handles better on road and on fair to midland trails rides a little better. But on anything with a decent amount of rocks or ruts a well setup coil-sprung solid axle is often more comfortable. IFS gets the "IFS hop" and transfers way more of the hits through the truck vs. a good solid axle that's just kind of doing it's thing under the vehicle. Watch a solid axle rig go through an obstacle and then watch a IFS rig. The solid axle rigs's body stays way flatter and moves around way less than an IFS rig. It doesn't take much trail time to see how much IFS rigs are lifting tires and such, that's not comfortable to me.

I have both a solid axle (WJ) and IFS ('11 Chevy 2500) rig and I've taken both offroad. Solids are way, way superior in anything challenging but on road yes, the IFS is generally nicer.

-TJ
 
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tjZ06

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He then goes on to say IFS vehicles are lighter than older, solid axle vehicles. My solid axle WJ is about 4k, a current IFS 4Runner is about 4800lbs. He says IFS isn't as good at towing big loads, and you need a solid axle rig to tow heavy. I regularly tow about 16k lbs with my IFS truck, but I'd never do that with my solid axle rig. He also says solid axle vehicles have a full-frame and are stronger and don't crumple... but IFS vehicles are built to crumple. I think the unibody on my solid axle unibody WJ would crumple way more than the hydroformed, fully closed-tube (no C-channel) frame on my IFS rig. Also, he keeps only talking about CVs. Yes, my particular solid axle vehicle currently has CVs (keyword: currently) but TONS of solid axle rigs use U-joints not CVs in the axles. He also say solid axles don't have rubber CV boots, IFS does... but what are those rubber boot things around the CVs in the solid axle of my WJ? And, and, and, and...

20190121_134404.jpg

What this video should have been called is "pros and cons of this particular 70 series Land Cruiser and this particular NBS Ranger."

-TJ
 
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Yeah sorry wrong example. My colorado is 6200 lb and i haul 10k regularly with ifs, my ford ranger prerunner goes through sand dunes just fine with ifs as well. Ive never had a stick go trough a cv boot either and i regularly run over sticks, branches and even logs and anything else that gets in the way
 

tjZ06

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Yeah sorry wrong example. My colorado is 6200 lb and i haul 10k regularly with ifs, my ford ranger prerunner goes through sand dunes just fine with ifs as well. Ive never had a stick go trough a cv boot either and i regularly run over sticks, branches and even logs and anything else that gets in the way
My sand toys have always been IFS too... but they're a bit different:

wheelies.jpg

-TJ
 
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tjZ06

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Oh stop it now your making me want to build a ultra 4.
Well, if it makes you feel any better I sold that one (black one on the left) because it was just getting to be too much hassle and was losing some of the fun. I'll build another "someday" but I'm really enjoying the simple pleasures of Overland camping right now...

-TJ
 

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Well, if it makes you feel any better I sold that one (black one on the left) because it was just getting to be too much hassle and was losing some of the fun. I'll build another "someday" but I'm really enjoying the simple pleasures of Overland camping right now...

-TJ
I go through the same with my hobbies i get bored or burnt out for a while then go back eventually.
 

MOAK

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In this case, you can.

I'm less than a minute into this, and it's already wildly inaccurate. I generally like Ronny's videos, but the way he's describing how a solid axle suspension works is way, way off. He's describing it as if there were a pivot-point in the dead-middle of the axle that is fixed to the chassis, so when one tire dropped down the other would have to go up an equal amount. That's simply not remotely true. Even the most basic leaf-spring suspension works far more eloquently than that, and when one tire moves down the other does not have to move up (though it will change the relative camber of that other tire). Link suspensions can be even more sophisticated, but there is NO solid axle suspension in existence that works the way he's describing.

His generalizations are also kind of ridiculous. Drive a WJ on really good fresh suspension (not a clapped-out example) and they handle nothing "like a boat." Then he gets into handling and again, implies that a solid axle works completely differently than it does. Yes, in general an IFS rig handles better on road and on fair to midland trails rides a little better. But on anything with a decent amount of rocks or ruts a well setup coil-sprung solid axle is often more comfortable. IFS gets the "IFS hop" and transfers way more of the hits through the truck vs. a good solid axle that's just kind of doing it's thing under the vehicle. Watch a solid axle rig go through an obstacle and then watch a IFS rig. The solid axle rigs's body stays way flatter and moves around way less than an IFS rig. It doesn't take much trail time to see how much IFS rigs are lifting tires and such, that's not comfortable to me.

I have both a solid axle (WJ) and IFS ('11 Chevy 2500) rig and I've taken both offroad. Solids are way, way superior in anything challenging but on road yes, the IFS is generally nicer.

-TJ
I thought he did a relatively good job of explaining how a solid axle works as compared to IFS. However, maybe not for you or I as we have a greater understanding of the mechanics of solid axle suspensions than the newbie may have. My daughter explained her research to me concerning her field of solid state chemistry. I understood enough of it to get the idea, however, any chemist worth their degree would have picked her explanation to me apart. So for some one completely ignorant about axles and how they work? I think you get my point.. And yea, my Landcruiser rides like a large boat on choppy waters compared to my son in laws 4runner that bounces around quite a bit. You are talking a bout a jeep I think ( wj? ) and for some reason they do bounce around quite a bit and you feel every choppy little wave because the stock jeep suspensions leave a whole lot to be desired. Remember, Ronny is from Australia and has access to the finest of 4wd vehicles in the world. Here in the US we do not. We are stuck with Jeeps, Chevys, Fords, Dodges and only two basic models of Landcruisers. The full size 80s, 100s, and 200s, or the old 40s. My point being, when Ronny or Andrew or Roothy generalize their statements and reviews of 4wd vehicles they are generalizing from an entirely different stable of vehicles that we simply do not have access to. "Ridiculous" you say? I think not.
 

tjZ06

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I thought he did a relatively good job of explaining how a solid axle works as compared to IFS. However, maybe not for you or I as we have a greater understanding of the mechanics of solid axle suspensions than the newbie may have. My daughter explained her research to me concerning her field of solid state chemistry. I understood enough of it to get the idea, however, any chemist worth their degree would have picked her explanation to me apart. So for some one completely ignorant about axles and how they work? I think you get my point.. And yea, my Landcruiser rides like a large boat on choppy waters compared to my son in laws 4runner that bounces around quite a bit. You are talking a bout a jeep I think ( wj? ) and for some reason they do bounce around quite a bit and you feel every choppy little wave because the stock jeep suspensions leave a whole lot to be desired. Remember, Ronny is from Australia and has access to the finest of 4wd vehicles in the world. Here in the US we do not. We are stuck with Jeeps, Chevys, Fords, Dodges and only two basic models of Landcruisers. The full size 80s, 100s, and 200s, or the old 40s. My point being, when Ronny or Andrew or Roothy generalize their statements and reviews of 4wd vehicles they are generalizing from an entirely different stable of vehicles that we simply do not have access to. "Ridiculous" you say? I think not.
I have to disagree. Yes, I might understand solid axles better than the average viewer of Ronny's videos, but that is WHY it's important he gives a legit explanation of how they work and behave. They don't work anything like he described. And yes, I'm talking about a Jeep (WJ). They have them in Aus too, in fact I've driven one there, so Ronny would be familiar with them too. Generalizing solid axles vs. IFS doesn't have anything to do with the stable he has access to, that's the whole point of generalizing. Leaf sprung solid axles will work in generally the same way. Coil-sprung multi-link solid axles will work in generally the same way. Double-wishbone IFS will work in generally the same way.

-TJ