TRAVELS: What animal have you seen increase in number the most?

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Desert Runner

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Deer, Antelope, Elk, Black Bear, Moose? For example: along the hwy 14 corridor, in Southern Utah, all the listed, except Moose have greatly expanded (no Moose-non indiginous ) 15 years ago, you saw some deer, now they are everywhere. Antelope, rarely, Elk, they were their but stayed way back in the woods. The rare black bear was talked about, but was a rumor more than a fact. Now you hear that someone's trailer or cabin had a visit, every year.

More often than not, you will see at least Deer and Antelope(Pronghorn) from the Hwy and dirt back roads. Some of this might be....might?, be because of property lots being purchased, and access to hunting these areas have been restricted.
 
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Kipp

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It’s usually good - except when you are on a really narrow trail with limited pull-offs and people keep coming in the other direction.
 

Desert Runner

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Raptors, since the banning of DDT in 1972. It was very rare to see a Bird of Pray where I lived.
View attachment 92643
Out near Jean, NV, in the 'Jean Roach Dry Lake area, their are quite a few Red Tailed Hawks. More than you would think could be supported, due to limited resources. About 2 miles South of the small airport there, a nesting pair had at least 1, possibly 2 chicks. They made the nest in one of those huge steel power line poles that carry the big power across the country. Have seen them there for the last 3 years.

If you ever get up to Alaska, make the trip thru the "Valley of the Eagles". It's amazing how many are there nesting, hanging out, etc. Obviously, food is plentiful. Located between the coast, and the interior Canadian border on the way to the Port of Juneau.

Will see if i can locate some pics.
 
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MOAK

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As a 60s kid on the farm, I grew up never seeing a hawk, let alone any bald eagles. now they are plentiful. Because of the aforementioned banning of DDT. Other species have been hunted to near extinction, the pheasant comes to mind.. The deer population in Pa is way down as more have been hunted.. sadly, overall in the lower 48, the population of wild mammals has decreased substantially.
 
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avgjoe624

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over about the past.....ehhh,, 3 years or so, i see a turtle almost every time i hit a trail.

It used to be a rare treat to be able to stop and help a turtle across, but it seems much more common (atleast to me) in the past few years
 

Desert Runner

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Here in Southern Nevada, south of Las Vegas, it is tortoises. In the last 4 years, they have been seen in more quantities, then ever before. The BLM has now mandated that for off-road testing, any permit granted requires a 'spotter' to ride along with a driver. As a spotter, you are responsible to be an extra set of eyes to the driver. The smaller younger ones can look like small rocks, and you don't always see them at a distance.

On a side note....per the permit, you can not touch them, or move them out of the way, You go around or...WAIT! ...until they move. This is a Commercial permit requirement, the private citizen...well...that restriction does not apply.
 
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Desert Runner

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Non Colorado natives. Not complaining! Most are awesome
Some additional pics from a work trip to Canada. A Buffalo, And a caraboui . Never expected to see them in NW Canada, let alone in such numbers. The herd was eating salt off the road, and was over 50 animals, maybe as many as 75. The caraboui had also been eating the melting ice and chowing down on plants along the hwy. Saw a few of them, but not in any quantity. Although no pics, I saw moose also. But I expected to see some of them.

ALSO:

In Northern Idaho/Western Montana, saw a lone,wolf just outside BROWNING, later a wolf pack chasing a deer right next to the hwy coming South. In the same area, a huge herd of Elk thru the snow fog.

In Nevada:

The animals most recovered and now seen are the Elk herds in the north, antelope(Pronghorn), both in the North and Central areas, deer not so much due to mountain lion predication.

The Elk in Southern Nevada are limited to mostly the Mt. Charleston range due to the surrounding desert landscape. It has been a up and down battle with big horn sheep numbers, due to a couple of fatal disease outbreaks. NDW (Nevada Dept. Of Wildlife)
And University of Nevada Studies, have done numerous transplants to diversify the herds, to try to limit herd fatalities, and keep a viable gene diversity. 20151213_111507.jpeg20151213_111818.jpeg20151213_151048.jpeg
 
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Steve in Roanoke VA

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In SW Virginia, we are overrun with deer. The funny thing is that I see a lot more of them in my backyard (in a neighborhood) than I see when driving forest roads in the National Forest.
 

Desert Runner

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In SW Virginia, we are overrun with deer. The funny thing is that I see a lot more of them in my backyard (in a neighborhood) than I see when driving forest roads in the National Forest.
Southern Ut deer have blossomed in the last 15 years. I have had them bedded down 70 feet from camp. There are mt lion in the area, but road hunters with their dogs keep them in check.

Last year in the meadow below, a Mt Lion killed a doe in broad daylight. There were campers all around, on all sides. Happened 100 yards from us on one side, and a campsite on the other side. Family dogs and young kids, were around too. Everybody thought it was overly bold, seeing that the lion hunters would Come by 3-4 times a week. After that, most of us were carrying strapped.
 
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David C Gibbs

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No North America Antelope exist? These animals are called Pronghorn, see: Pronghorn - Antilocapra americana - NatureWorks
They are unique to North America, and there are 7 Sub-species from Baja to Canada. The Rocky Mountain Pronghorn is the largest of them.
I have 100's of photos of them. I tract 5 bands (herds) of them in Idaho, 3 in northern Nevada, and 2 different bands in eastern Oregon.
In Southern Idaho - Badgers, Yellow Belly Marmots and Coyotes are on the rise. Due to the introduction of the Canadian Grey Wolf, species on decline are
ELK. Species on the move into urban areas - Bobcat, Cougar /Mountain Lions, and Black Bear.
I have White Tail and mule deer in the neighborhood, they will come into the yard and eat the bird seed on the ground.
DG
 

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Roam_CO85

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Non Colorado natives. Not complaining! Most are awesome
Colorado natives are hard to come across these days! I pride my self being one from a once a small town north of fort collins. Last ten years its hard to tell where ftc starts stops and welltown picks up


Wolves is one animal that ive seen more of in the last ten years. Game and fish would argue that they arent here YET. Spent enough time in the wild to know when something for sure isnt a coyote. Also sense the release of moose a while back you use to maybe see one. Now you see more and more. Spend alot of time in walden colorado and its the moose capital of the country other than alaska
 
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