travel fatigue - how to avoid travel-weary at longterm journeys | OVERLAND BOUND COMMUNITY

travel fatigue - how to avoid travel-weary at longterm journeys

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4x4tripping

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Most of us are not satisfied with just working, we take care of our relationship, we meet family and friends, do hobbies and participate in clubs, go dancing on the weekend, to the theater, cinema, fine dining, and do sports.

If you think that a long-term trip automatically brings a good balance, and analyze the whole thing a bit, you will quickly realize that there are also some things to consider when traveling.

Our mind requires a certain amount of stimulation in order to feel fulfilled. This is where the work-life balance analyses that have been explored more deeply with the increasing burnout/boreout syndromes in our modern society help us.

Of course, these are not issues that come up when traveling for 2-3 months. But that can happen quickly on longer trips.

Article: travel fatigue - how to avoid travel-weary at longterm journeys

I hope my english is understandable, because it is not my national language. And hope it helps some traveler out there.

trippin
 
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Mustang03

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First, for those who are just skimming by the description, this is not a long article and worth the read. Yes, the English is not "standard", but that's ok! It's the content more than the syntax that matters.

The author makes a valid point. I would suggest that travel fatigue could affect one partner more than the other to the extent that it ends up affecting both of you to some extent. If not addressed, it will result in increasing fatigue/tension. That's no fun for anyone!

We have experienced this phenomenon at various levels on our travels in the past. When we were full-time RVers, it wasn't as much of an issue, because we would move from camping spot to camping spot with ample time to pause and relax in between being "tourists". When we traded the motorhome for a truck camper with a permanent house, it became more of an issue when we tried to maintain the same lifestyle/pace. Truck camper got kind of small after a few months and we finally said 'hellwithit' and went home. Our trips now are much shorter and the issue doesn't arise... as much.

Awareness of what is happening and dealing with it effectively in some way is what I take away from this short essay. Nice job, 4x4tripping!
 

AggieOE

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Good read.
You know I've always been curious about this, especially regarding some of the people I follow on Instagram and Youtube. I remember watching an old episode of @venture4wd on Youtube and he mentioned how, at times, traveling solo gets just plain lonely. From my normal, I've found a couple of weeks away to be a good amount of time before I start missing our dogs, home space, backyard, neighborhood walks, friends, and oddly enough the productive fulfillment from work.

I really can't imagine what full-time travel feels like, especially if an end date isn't set.
 

ZombieCat

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Amen! Extended travel, especially when dealing with the space limitations of tents, rooftop tents, or teardrop campers, can be exhausting. Add to that the task of finding decent campsites, mechanical issues, rain/snow/extreme temperatures, planning and simply driving long distances…some days you just want to ditch it all and head home.
I just experienced that feeling a few days ago - sub-freezing temperatures, snow, and wind gusts up to 70 mph! Couldn’t set up the tent, so I shuffled everything around and slept in the truck. Drove south to escape the storms, but high winds chased me across two more states; another night in the cramped truck. Ugh!
A much wiser person once said, “Never quit on a bad day.” So true. Your perspective is better when not clouded by despair. Today I’m camped at the South Rim of the Grand Canyon and it’s spectacular! Onward!
 
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ThundahBeagle

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Good topic. For the less experienced or uninitiated, this fatigue can set in more quickly - especially if one believes that Instagram-quality is all that exists out there. The realities also are present, and they set in at some point.

Sort of like driving a convertible if you never have. The wind noise would become annoying at some point. For example, I love to drive with my window open. My girlfriend hates it. When camping in Colorado's grasslands, it was a beautiful plains overlooking some water. But it sure was non-stop windy. There was no way to start a fire for warm drinks or food without making a 2 or 3 sided shelter first, which took time even though we had driven many hours.

Horses in a parade are a beautiful thing to see, but there is a mess they leave behind. If you only see pictures of beautiful horses, then the first time you set foot in a barn, you are sobered to a certain reality.

So, realistic expectations and a positive outlook are also key, most definitely when far from home.

Be ready to cope while enjoying the beauty of what IS, versus what you expect
 

mep1811

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Many people want to get in as much as they can in a trip. Like tagging bases. Hit a spot after 12 hours of driving , take a selfie and move on to the next selfie.

Many people are focused on the destination and not the journey. Rather than picking one good trip I've seen people try to see "everything" in one trip.

I do have the benefit of being retired but I still follow the same guidelines. Ideally , I leave about 9AM and want to be in camp by 4PM. That gives me at least two hours of sight seeing on the road to get to camp NLT 6PM. Depending on the traffic that can be very late to find a spot.

The purpose of travel ,to me to go out and see things and not be a road warrior.
 

AggieOE

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Many people want to get in as much as they can in a trip. Like tagging bases. Hit a spot after 12 hours of driving , take a selfie and move on to the next selfie.

Many people are focused on the destination and not the journey. Rather than picking one good trip I've seen people try to see "everything" in one trip.

I do have the benefit of being retired but I still follow the same guidelines. Ideally , I leave about 9AM and want to be in camp by 4PM. That gives me at least two hours of sight seeing on the road to get to camp NLT 6PM. Depending on the traffic that can be very late to find a spot.

The purpose of travel ,to me to go out and see things and not be a road warrior.
I agree with this but for most people's traveling, we ARE limited by time, more specifically PTO. I think the fatigue aspect of this though ties directly into your thoughts and the OPs article. Fatigue of trying to fit in as much as possible in a small window of allowed time is exhausting and can foul a trip or, as you spoke of, an experience, a moment.

It's hard to balance the desire to see as much as possible, quantity-wise, with the ability to see as much as possible, quality-wise.

Since I live in Houston and it takes me forever to get anywhere, this hits me directly since I try to make my 1 or 2 week PTO trip fit in a month or two worth of sites and experiences. There is a trade-off and if it isn't balanced, it's exhausting. Next thing you know, you only arrived at dark, you spent most of your time (not just miles but time) on the highway and although you saw things, you didn't get to really experience them.
 

oldsoldier181

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I read the article, I thought it was well written, and thought out.
I used to follow a lot of blogs of people who hike the Appalachian Trail. They use it as a 6 month long "vacation" from life. But, as the OP points out-vacations dont put daily chores in the background: you still need to keep clean, eat, sleep, plan your day, etc.
The "van life" movement was huge for a bit. Most of those people, who unplugged-went back to a somewhat normal life. Because, again, as the OP points out-we STILL need regular, everyday stuff. Doing it differently, is still doing it.
As to the social aspect of it. I 100% agree with this. Especially these days. We are experiencing a time in our lives where we dont-many actually prefer not to-physically interact with each other. Instead, preferring it through social media, etc. Speaking for myself, I have personally taken a reverse approach to this: I seek out activities that are, by nature, social. I taught myself mandolin, so I can play with local musicians, once every other week. I belong to several social and community groups locally. We NEED that social interaction. Being on an extended vacation, it may only be us, and our significant others, for longer periods of time. Socializing with others is extremely important. And can curb off depression.
A few years ago, they did a study in nursing homes, and residents who had regular interactions with loved ones were FAR better off than those alone. Even though those without loved ones, still had interactions with staff, and other residents-it appeared (it was a single study, so take it as you will) that interaction with people whom you have an intimate relationship with-family, long term friends, etc-is overall better for you.
Anyway, great article. Gives people something to think about :). Long term travel isnt all roses. Its simply changing a lifestyle, from a stationary one, to a mobile one.