Thoughts on vehicle First Aid/Trauma Kits

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gjkoenig

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Hello all,

This is my second post and am very glad to be here. I discovered OB by searching YouTube for inspiration in trying to sort out my vehicle get home bag dilemma.
First off, I became interested in prepping a few years ago and I was also an EMT in my town EMS Squad. My main focus has been on vehicle prepping (tools, water, recovery gear, a get home bag, and a comprehensive first aid/trauma kit). Because I like to have adequate first aid supplies, I have separated the trauma kit and FAK into two pouches that are those split zipper type 8x5 inch IFAKs with Molle straps.

When doing a re-evaluation of my backpack get home bag (GHB), I realized I have too much stuff and it is overly heavy. Even with trimming down, there is still not enough room for either trauma or first aid kit. A larger GHB is not an option as it is already at the maximum size I would want to carry in the event I would have to trek home in a SHTF scenario. Strapping both the trauma and FAK to the GHB backpack was not an option either, it would be way too much to load up, aside from me looking like and overworked camel from the onset.

This led me to my YouTube search where I found Chris's OB 3 in 1 Med Kit. I love how he broke this kit down into the basic needs, albeit, for focus on vehicle and base camp use. I was unsuccessfully looking for a way jam all of my supplies on or into my GHB, when I realized I didn't have to. I was stopped in my tracks as this presented me with a solution. The answer was to create the same OB 3 in 1 Med Kit for vehicle use and just thin down to one of the IFAK pouches to put in some duplicate trauma and first aid supplies, where it would only be one pouch attached to the outside of the GHB in the event I would have to abandon the vehicle. If I were not traveling solo, another person could just take the 3 in 1 Med Kit too. I did as Chris suggested by not over packing the bag in case one wanted to put other items into it. Having an additional smaller FAK pouch could be useful in the case of a situation when victims are in 2 separate locations, where a second responder could just grab the smaller kit and go, and not deplete supplies from the base 3 in 1 Med Kit. I don't know how many overlanders go on hikes away from their vehicles, but if so, it is always wise to carry some sort of first aid supplies. This then brings up the topic for what to actually carry in a day hiking bag....another area from prepping.

I just though I would share this as I am now thinking more about what scenarios overlanding would bring by being more vehicle reliant. I see many parallels that overlanding has with prepping. Sort of like 2 hobbies in one.
 
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oneleglance

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water clean enough to drink and as sterile as possible rolls of gauze.
That is 90% of what you need.
I work as an ICU RN in Phoenix as see lots of field injuries that get dealt with slowly or quickly....the biggest issue is dirty wounds and bleeding.
I also work as a Remote EMT and medical for desert races, long trips and have done international stuff.
In the USA you are never really that far from help, especially if you have an InReach or Spot.

So lots of water to clean the wound and gauze to apply pressure/keep it clean.
After that it comes down to the nice things....Benadryl for bee/allergy, pain with Tylenol & Ibuprofen, Ace wrap for joints, and on down the list....
But if you only have limited space fill it with water (or filter if you live in a place that has water) and rolls of gauze.
 
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gjkoenig

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water clean enough to drink and as sterile as possible rolls of gauze.
That is 90% of what you need.
I work as an ICU RN in Phoenix as see lots of field injuries that get dealt with slowly or quickly....the biggest issue is dirty wounds and bleeding.
I also work as a Remote EMT and medical for desert races, long trips and have done international stuff.
In the USA you are never really that far from help, especially if you have an InReach or Spot.

So lots of water to clean the wound and gauze to apply pressure/keep it clean.
After that it comes down to the nice things....Benadryl for bee/allergy, pain with Tylenol & Ibuprofen, Ace wrap for joints, and on down the list....
But if you only have limited space fill it with water (or filter if you live in a place that has water) and rolls of gauze.
I agree with really needing just the basics in most cases. As a former EMT, 90% of the calls were medical emergencies in nature
(cardiac, respiratory, diabetic, etc.) that did not involve bleeding or fractures/splinting. I guess it is a balance of fighting equipmentitus where having the supplies puts a pressure on trying to carry it all. This is something the prepping community talks about a lot, where you have to decide what is the most likely scenario in one's environment, the chances of happening, and what is the minimum needed for equipment/supplies. The total weight of trauma/first aid supplies I carry probably doesn't exceed two 16oz bottles of water, almost negligible.
Where I live, it would be impossible to be stranded, just way too populated. Having said that, people here are not like other areas across the country where neighbor helps neighbor. I like to keep my independence and be prepared.
 

Road

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Hello all,

This is my second post and am very glad to be here. I discovered OB by searching YouTube for inspiration in trying to sort out my vehicle get home bag dilemma.
First off, I became interested in prepping a few years ago and I was also an EMT in my town EMS Squad. My main focus has been on vehicle prepping (tools, water, recovery gear, a get home bag, and a comprehensive first aid/trauma kit). Because I like to have adequate first aid supplies, I have separated the trauma kit and FAK into two pouches that are those split zipper type 8x5 inch IFAKs with Molle straps.

When doing a re-evaluation of my backpack get home bag (GHB), I realized I have too much stuff and it is overly heavy. Even with trimming down, there is still not enough room for either trauma or first aid kit. A larger GHB is not an option as it is already at the maximum size I would want to carry in the event I would have to trek home in a SHTF scenario. Strapping both the trauma and FAK to the GHB backpack was not an option either, it would be way too much to load up, aside from me looking like and overworked camel from the onset.

This led me to my YouTube search where I found Chris's OB 3 in 1 Med Kit. I love how he broke this kit down into the basic needs, albeit, for focus on vehicle and base camp use. I was unsuccessfully looking for a way jam all of my supplies on or into my GHB, when I realized I didn't have to. I was stopped in my tracks as this presented me with a solution. The answer was to create the same OB 3 in 1 Med Kit for vehicle use and just thin down to one of the IFAK pouches to put in some duplicate trauma and first aid supplies, where it would only be one pouch attached to the outside of the GHB in the event I would have to abandon the vehicle. If I were not traveling solo, another person could just take the 3 in 1 Med Kit too. I did as Chris suggested by not over packing the bag in case one wanted to put other items into it. Having an additional smaller FAK pouch could be useful in the case of a situation when victims are in 2 separate locations, where a second responder could just grab the smaller kit and go, and not deplete supplies from the base 3 in 1 Med Kit. I don't know how many overlanders go on hikes away from their vehicles, but if so, it is always wise to carry some sort of first aid supplies. This then brings up the topic for what to actually carry in a day hiking bag....another area from prepping.

I just though I would share this as I am now thinking more about what scenarios overlanding would bring by being more vehicle reliant. I see many parallels that overlanding has with prepping. Sort of like 2 hobbies in one.
.
Cool post, and am glad you're sharing your experience both with prepping and past as an EMT.

I have several FAKs around my van and trailer, and shop, and keep smaller ones in daypacks for walkabouts and canoe trips, fishing, etc. and a more substantial, though still basic one from MyMedic on the inside of my van's back door.

Though I need to get them all out, compare what each one has, assess current needs, redistribute accordingly, and check expiration dates, etc. Every once in a while, too, I make my kid and her kid aware where my FAKs are in house and rig, and what they have in them. Also take that time to remind them of fire-extinguisher locations and of and their use.
.
 

gjkoenig

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Koenig
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KD2UQW
.
Cool post, and am glad you're sharing your experience both with prepping and past as an EMT.

I have several FAKs around my van and trailer, and shop, and keep smaller ones in daypacks for walkabouts and canoe trips, fishing, etc. and a more substantial, though still basic one from MyMedic on the inside of my van's back door.

Though I need to get them all out, compare what each one has, assess current needs, redistribute accordingly, and check expiration dates, etc. Every once in a while, too, I make my kid and her kid aware where my FAKs are in house and rig, and what they have in them. Also take that time to remind them of fire-extinguisher locations and of and their use.
.
Sounds like a good plan. I don't check for expiration dates enough and have a pet peeve about using non-Band-Aid brand band-aids as I have seen the adhesive on way too many off brands dry up and be useless. I did this recently and was dumbfounded that I was carring My FAK for the Get HOme Bag backpack is very similar in size and construction to the MyMedic you posted. I bought this MediTac backpack for creating my OB 3 in 1 MedKit since I already had the supplies. If I didn't, the OB MedKit would have been a fantastic purchase. I think with these 2 bags, I'm all set, with no need to tinker around First Aid stuff again. Time to move on to needed vehicle maintenance and ugrades.
 
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Alanymarce

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Hmm - initially I had no idea what a "get home bag" meant. Reading the posts I figured out that it's a bag with what you think you need to leave your vehicle and walk out (am I right?).

So, this breaks the first rule of remote travel - NEVER, EVER, leave the vehicle. There was a thread recently with the tragic story of a couple who tried, unsuccessfully, to do this.

If I'm misunderstanding OP's intent, please educate me.
 

gjkoenig

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Hmm - initially I had no idea what a "get home bag" meant. Reading the posts I figured out that it's a bag with what you think you need to leave your vehicle and walk out (am I right?).

So, this breaks the first rule of remote travel - NEVER, EVER, leave the vehicle. There was a thread recently with the tragic story of a couple who tried, unsuccessfully, to do this.

If I'm misunderstanding OP's intent, please educate me.
Yes, it is primarily a bag containing essential equipment/supplies one would need in the case of a severe emergency (SHTF - s*** hits the fan) scenario where they would have to abandon their vehicle to walk home or get help. Yes, it is always best to stay with the vehicle and wait for help, and having extra supplies (especially water) could help ride it out until help arrives. In a true disaster (local or national), however, there might be no choice (i.e. road blocked due to hurricane, flood, fire, tornado, zombie apocalypse, etc., etc.) to abandon the vehicle because help will not be available. A get home bag should be best tailored to an individual's requirements (extra prescription meds/glasses), terrain, climate, season. There is a ton of info on this subject in the prepper world if interested. I have found that overlanding has a similar mindset in being vehicle prepared, but for different reasons. I find it very amusing that many prepper sites/channels talk about a bug out vehicle in a SHTF situation and describe mods for enhancing one's travel ability if roads become impassible, without ever directly mentioning overlanding vehicles. There is a tremendous amount of crossover equipment between camping, overlanding, and prepping. I would have never realized it before coming here and getting to know what it is all about.
 

Alanymarce

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Yes, it is primarily a bag containing essential equipment/supplies one would need in the case of a severe emergency (SHTF - s*** hits the fan) scenario where they would have to abandon their vehicle to walk home or get help. Yes, it is always best to stay with the vehicle and wait for help, and having extra supplies (especially water) could help ride it out until help arrives. In a true disaster (local or national), however, there might be no choice (i.e. road blocked due to hurricane, flood, fire, tornado, zombie apocalypse, etc., etc.) to abandon the vehicle because help will not be available. A get home bag should be best tailored to an individual's requirements (extra prescription meds/glasses), terrain, climate, season. There is a ton of info on this subject in the prepper world if interested. I have found that overlanding has a similar mindset in being vehicle prepared, but for different reasons. I find it very amusing that many prepper sites/channels talk about a bug out vehicle in a SHTF situation and describe mods for enhancing one's travel ability if roads become impassible, without ever directly mentioning overlanding vehicles. There is a tremendous amount of crossover equipment between camping, overlanding, and prepping. I would have never realized it before coming here and getting to know what it is all about.
Thanks for the explanation.
 

MMc

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In CA I have a get home bag in both my autos and have for years. when we have a BIG earthquake I will want to get to my father. I have read the emergency plan for the state. Bottom line is everybody should be able to take care of you and yours for 3 days, getting home could be very hard, so be prepared. Walking home might be part of it. I don't think of myself as a prep guy but my friends do. I gathered all the stuff in my First Aid Kits, I have a SAR background so it based on experience and "what if's" I spend weeks in remote Baja and Help might be 2 to 3 days away. I has worked for me so far. I have yet to find a over the counter kit that I like.
 
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gjkoenig

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In CA I have a get home bag in both my autos and have for years. when we have a BIG earthquake I will want to get to my father. I have read the emergency plan for the state. Bottom line is everybody should be able to take care of you and yours for 3 days, getting home could be very hard, so be prepared. Walking home might be part of it. I don't think of myself as a prep guy but my friends do. I gathered all the stuff in my First Aid Kits, I have a SAR background so it based on experience and "what if's" I spend weeks in remote Baja and Help might be 2 to 3 days away. I has worked for me so far. I have yet to find a over the counter kit that I like.
Thanks for the response. I have always put together my kits from supplies I had or individually purchased. I read the prepper stuff but don't completely subscribe to the hype. There is a lot of pushing product that clouds what is really necessary. Just be prepared in your own way, within your own means....keeping it simple.

Great video by 0000 on overlanding gear used for survival Survival GEAR you NEED for the UNEXPECTED
 
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MMc

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Thanks for the response. I have always put together my kits from supplies I had or individually purchased. I read the prepper stuff but don't completely subscribe to the hype. There is a lot of pushing product that clouds what is really necessary. Just be prepared in your own way, within your own means....keeping it simple.
Yep!! I do know it doesn't go down as you think it will. It's up to you to adjust and over come. Failing to prepare is a sure way to fail.