Theory vs reality

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Boostpowered

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Ive seen many folks (not just here) telling people what they need to do to their rig to make it trail ready yet those same folks tell the person asking that they always drive around the mud bypass the rocks etc or that they dont really go do heavy offroading they just overland. Well sometimes you cant drive around something or back up.

I liken this to the couch commandos in the firearm world they like the idea of guns they just dont have the money, time or skill to go shoot but for some reason they tout themselves as firearm experts but the reality is they have very little experience with a weapon yet they have read enough stuff on the internet to think they are experts.

You really arent going to know what is needed or whats gonna break or where your gonna get stuck unless your out there really getting into it.

Another example is when someone asks what jack they should use, without knowing anything about the rig or situation the first answer is always a hi lift farm jack. Sure of youve got all the fancy metal bumpers and rock sliders with hi lift mounting points then thats a good fit but if you have plastic bumpers and side steps or bare body then a hi lift isnt for you you will hurt your rig and yourself and likely not lift anything. Same with winches i love the idea of an electric winch but with plastic bumper there is no where to mount it without spending $$$ on a metal winch bumper. Hand winches/comealongs work fine just be prepared for some sweat equity.

The moral of the rant is be careful who your taking information from they may be well versed in offroad gear that they have read about and or bought but they will have never used it. I mean if your afraid of the mud and avoid it how do you know what i need to not get stuck? Also their info may be based on experience with one type of vehicle ie jeep when your driving a pickup, the dynamics are way different between the two.

Im not picking on any certain person just realise that atleast half of the info your going to get on the internet will be coming from folks with very little experience who are repeating what theyve read somewhere.
 

Kryllac

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I know how that is! A buddy of mine would always claim he was an expert in off-roading, but he barely ever went. I have been off-road driving since I was twelve and my dad would send me to the gas station for him in our old '97 Dodge 1500 stick shift. I don't claim to be an expert in anything, but off-road driving and firearms are my two favorite things and I am great at both (prior infantry). Yes, you may off road with me and might even see me get stuck. Everyone has their days, but you can bet that I will find a way to get myself out!
 

Boostpowered

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Im only bringing this up because of the influx of mall crawlers showing up in tx they have the newest rig with all the latest gear but you never see a lick of dirt on their rigs. Then when one sees my newish truck covered in mud and no visible winch im looked at like ive got aids or something. I grew up on a farm as an only child so mud became one of my best friends and still is. I learned along time ago floor mats or sticks work wonders in the mud back before the fancy plastic sand tracks everyone has now. Also when you have rope and a wheel that spins feely you dont really need a fancy winch.
 

Boostpowered

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I havent been able to find anyone to offroad with me since 1999 when i drove a nissan pathfinder thats how bad this instagram generation is they want to look the part and put up a bunch of pics they may even find a dirty puddle to splash through to make it look like something happened with their rig but its straight to the carwash after that. The offroad world is for some reason seeing the same type thing happen that happened to jdm tuners after fast and furious came out, everyone wanted a supra or 300zx but no one was willing to race them i know because i had a 95 rx7 and no one but corvettes ever wanted some of it.
 

KonzaLander

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It is good practice to wash your rig immediately after a trip. Doing so helps prevent the spread of invasive species that can be transported to other environments :smirk: The off-road community has always been plagued with exhibitionists. Nowadays these same folks can make their experiences seem almost whimsical thanks to social media whereas in the days past would require being published in a magazine.

Let's be honest with ourselves. If you are new to off pavement travel, camping, etc you really need experience to figure out what you need to be successful. The experience does not need to be wild or extravagant and can most likely be done locally. Most of the "must haves" are simply things other people really like that make their experience better. My advice is to simply get out there with other folks and see what would make your experience more enjoyable.
 

Contributor II

When people ask about what is needed for offroading and camping I always recommend the bare minimum. Then take it out in a simple area and try it out to see what works best for them and what they need to add.

Texas is full of mall crawlers. They are usually lifted 2wd vehicles with mud tires that are almost bald from hard cement roads. The weird thing is I have also seen many slammed 4wds in texas too.
 

Polaris Overland

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Good advice should be sought from someone with experience.
You wouldn't ask a random stranger how to treat a medical emergency, you would ask a medical professional.
The same goes with Overlanding. There are lots of arm chair overlanders out there and if you listened to what they say you would have no money left from buying kit you will never use and you will never go out on a trip because you are scared of the horror stories they tell you.

Any vehicle can be used for overlanding. On the Pamir Highway we met a London Double Decker Bus doing the Mongol Rally and in Mongolia we met a Russian in a Mustang with low profile tyres.

The best tool you have for Overlanding is your brain and using it to know your limits. Take small steps, don't bite off more than you can chew.
We travelled last year for 200 days to Mongolia and back. We lived in our vehicle so when it is your home you protect it. However that does not mean you don't go anywhere adventurous. We still managed to complete the Northern Route with river crossings in Mongolia and returned via the Gobi Desert and the Pamir Highway (4655m).

So use your brain, speak to the real overlanders and go out and learn about yourselves and your vehicle / kit.

PS I have a Hi Lift Jack and a bottle jack. Hi Lift jacks can be dangerous if used incorrectly so ours is only used when its essential. Changing tyres, wheel and axle maintenance is done with the bottle jack and folding axle stands. Again use your brain and work safely.


Mongolia Raid 2018 Trip
Snip20190424_3.png
 

Billiebob

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Im only bringing this up because of the influx of mall crawlers showing up in tx they have the newest rig with all the latest gear but you never see a lick of dirt on their rigs
yep.

Believe me, if you post a picture of that shiny thing with a highlift on the hood, a snorkel up the A-pillar and 400# of homebilt welded bumpers....... I only read the post for the entertainment value.

But post a picture of your used and abused Jeep or Landcruiser, or 3/4 ton with a clutch, and plenty of trail rash patina and you have my attention. Even better if it almost looks stock.

Generally speaking Jeep, Ford, Toyota got their off roaders right from the factory and often any mods beyond a winch lead to breakage on the trail. After 40 years of "building" 4x4s, I took all the mods off my TJR and run bone stock except for 33s and an AEV HighLine. And I have plenty of trail rash patina.

DSC_0043.jpeg

I don't want to climb a waterfall and I avoid mud pits. I use 4WD to drive without needing momentum. I use 4LO to smooth out a rough or steep trail. And I use lockers to tread lightly and avoid destroying the terra firma with excessive wheel spin. All of which means I never break anything..... even tho everything is stock.

380K kms on that '05 TJR. I put on 40K kms every year and 12K kms are towing a 2K# work trailer.

DSC_0072.jpg

Weekends mean trade trailers. Take off the ladders. Store the doors. Buy some food and find a beach to sleep on.
It takes 15 minutes to go from work truck to overlander.

I'm not sure anybody travels lighter than me.

DSC_0073.jpeg
 
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Billiebob

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Boostpowered

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hummmm...i just got THIS off the internet...
You sure did which means it is entertainment. Take everything on the internet with a grain of salt. Dont live vicariously through others go out and do something, or stay on the internet and get patted on the back for some pictures you took or congratulated for your opinion.
 

MMc

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Ive seen many folks (not just here) telling people what they need to do to their rig to make it trail ready yet those same folks tell the person asking that they always drive around the mud bypass the rocks etc or that they dont really go do heavy offroading they just overland. Well sometimes you cant drive around something or back up.

I liken this to the couch commandos in the firearm world they like the idea of guns they just dont have the money, time or skill to go shoot but for some reason they tout themselves as firearm experts but the reality is they have very little experience with a weapon yet they have read enough stuff on the internet to think they are experts.

You really arent going to know what is needed or whats gonna break or where your gonna get stuck unless your out there really getting into it.

Another example is when someone asks what jack they should use, without knowing anything about the rig or situation the first answer is always a hi lift farm jack. Sure of youve got all the fancy metal bumpers and rock sliders with hi lift mounting points then thats a good fit but if you have plastic bumpers and side steps or bare body then a hi lift isnt for you you will hurt your rig and yourself and likely not lift anything. Same with winches i love the idea of an electric winch but with plastic bumper there is no where to mount it without spending $$$ on a metal winch bumper. Hand winches/comealongs work fine just be prepared for some sweat equity.

The moral of the rant is be careful who your taking information from they may be well versed in offroad gear that they have read about and or bought but they will have never used it. I mean if your afraid of the mud and avoid it how do you know what i need to not get stuck? Also their info may be based on experience with one type of vehicle ie jeep when your driving a pickup, the dynamics are way different between the two.

Im not picking on any certain person just realise that atleast half of the info your going to get on the internet will be coming from folks with very little experience who are repeating what theyve read somewhere.
If I meet somebody who is offering advice I often ask to see the motor of their vehicle. If it has the same offroad batina as mine, I will most converse with them. If It doesn't well thats another story. I do try and avoid the mud most of the time, I don't mind it but, it adds a coupe hours to the wash time, spraying the underside mud off.
 
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David C Gibbs

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This Thread is so funny, I laughed so hard, I sorted iced tea out my nose...
We stopped at a shop, looking for a new pair of walking shoes for the Mrs., The shoe sales guy goes "What year this the Tacoma?" My answer was "It's a mid 2018, Double-Cab, TRD-Offroad." SSG "How do you like it?" My wife pipes up and says "I love it, thanks for asking." SSG "But I saw him get out of the Drivers side!" Wife "Yes, but you made an assumption, without enough information." I cleared my throat and said "We're here to find a new pair of Walking shoes for her." SSG "So, it's your daily-driver?" Wife "Yep" SSG "I'd never let my wife drive that!" Wife "I feel sorry for her." SSG looks at me and asks "What do you drive?" My reply was "An 88 -62 Series LandCruiser, with 312K original owner miles." SSG "So, why the upgrade to new walking shoes?" Wife "We're flying into Vancouver, BC and Driving up to Whistler to attend the BC Overland Rally!" SSG "Oh!," and he went quiet. We bought the shoes and moved on. . .

Yes, the 88 has been wheeled, sometimes hard. Yep, it's been camped in - at Yosemite, Yellowstone, Teton's, Rocky Mtns, Sawtooth's, Santa Catalina's, Hwy 1, Lost Coast, top of Shasta, Oregon Coast, all over Idaho and Eastern Oregon. It's been driven - hard at times, super slow at times, and 1000's of 1000's of those way off highway. It's been to the end of many roads and always has brought us home. We bought this LandCruiser to keep us safe, further off the highway. It's has never failed us. DG
 

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NinerMikeMike

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Nobody ever learned to ride a bike in a seminar. You gotta get out, fall down, figure it out, and keep trying until you get it right. And focusing on the rig is like focusing on the pan a great meal was cooked in. Yes, you need one, but it's entirely secondary to the outcome.

I welcome these forums & posts - sometimes because I laugh, sometimes because I learn.
 

MidOH

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I have a Drz400 for tight trails, and hardcore off road. I don't have to bang up my big truck to fit in. Don't forget that horses were the first overland vehicles, give or take MkI hiking boot.

Had a beater Jeep for wheeling and local camping. 99% of it's life, it did nothing better than a fullsize. I was jealous of trucks for most of my jeep days. Even a fullsize that I didn't want to scratch up. That last 1% of travel sure was priceless. But piss poor trail maintenance and a genuine disregard for people like us pretty much ruined all of the good trails. Now even jeeps can't fit anymore. They're Atv trails now.

Long trips? I'd prefer to have a scratch free, brand new, truck and camper.

You don't have to always cross a bunch of tight rocky trails to make camp off road. Some of us still have boots anyways. There's still plenty of people rocking 2wd's, Vanawagons, Sprinters, etc. etc. and still getting plenty of overlanding in. You can skip jeep trails if you're in a giant Earthroamer. No big deal.

Choose the right tool for the job. Many overlanding trips don't require hardcore off road rigs. You can cross Africa in a 2wd Mercedes.
 
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