Summits On The Air

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Mad Garden Gnome

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Off-Road Ranger I

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Ryan
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Marlett
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Some one asked me what SOTA is, so I did a brief description. I thought I would expand it a bit here, as it could tie into Overlanding, IMO.

Summits On The Air Website

Governmental Geological Surveys have qualifying parameters of what a summit is. As summiting is an activity, so is operating from summits. Amateur Radio Operators go to geologically recognized summits and "activate" them. Each country that participated in SOTA has it's own sets of operating rules. Here are the rules for the U.S. You post your activation dates, modes, and freq's on SOTAWatch for an approved summit. You can find summits for your area at SOTAMaps. Chasers like to collect summits. People that like to get out like to activate them.

Though you are required to achieve the summit by foot, there is no minimum vertical or horizontal distance that must be covered from a support vehicle. Operations may not be from, or in the vicinity of, a motor vehicle. It isn't unreasonable to be able to make it an Overland excursion.
 

Counterpoise

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Contributor I

National Parks On The Air (Npota) is running till end of year. This goes along with the 100th anniversary of the National Park Service. ARRL has a website for this. It is possible to operate both Sota and Npota or maybe Iota (Islands on the air) from the same site at the same time. I hope to set up a station on the Blue Ridge Parkway before years end.
 
E

expeditionnorth

Guest
National Parks On The Air (Npota) is running till end of year. This goes along with the 100th anniversary of the National Park Service. ARRL has a website for this. It is possible to operate both Sota and Npota or maybe Iota (Islands on the air) from the same site at the same time. I hope to set up a station on the Blue Ridge Parkway before years end.

I've worked a few SOTA over the years a& enjoy that
I hate to sound rude but I despise the NPOTA, in the beginning I felt it was a waste of band(s) crowding, now with the bands being really bad I dont hear any
I was privileged to be w1aw/1 vt back in 2013, that was fun, but stressful
seems the ARRL portrays a collective society while promoting contests which are individualistic in nature, but thats another debate of its own
 

UtahOverlander

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Concerning the topic of "Overland Related Recreation", I have several. Being new to the Overland side one of the things that will go great with Overlanding is Amateur Radio. I won't get into the details but the basic idea of SOTA is to ascend to the top of a mountain listed on the SOTA website and setup a mobile radio station. Using VHF/UHF/HF make contacts on your mobile rig. Each mountain "activation" is worth points for the activator and also points for the individuals "chasing" the activators (chasers). A lot of fun and makes for some unbelievable hikes. There are some rules, but basically you must use mobile power, you must top the mountain using your own power (hike, mountain bike, etc.), and others. You can review the SOTA rules and join in the fun at www.sota.org.uk.

If anyone would like to put together an Overland Bound HF NET let me know. A NET is basically an "on-the-air" gathering of amateur radio operators. Currently learning CW (Morse Code) also. Would love to connect with Overland Bound Ham Radio Operators.

73,
Todd
W5MTN
 

UtahOverlander

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Sorry, I didn't see that thread. I should have reviewed that first but was posting to related recreation. I guess it's not exactly recreation but related to recreation. HA!! Getting to the top of the mountain is the recreation. National Parks on the Air is also a related amateur radio activity. Let me know when you get your HF rig setup. Would be happy to connect.
 

UtahOverlander

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Good Luck on your Technicians exam. With just a little time studying, you should have no problem passing the test. That will open you up to the 2-meter repeaters in the area. With the Intermountain Intertie Repeater System, you can talk to other hams from Idaho, Wyoming, all the way to Las Vegas.
 
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ExGEO

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What kind of 2-meter coverage is out there? When I was in Austin we had several single repeaters. I've been in Florida for a while and the gulf coast ARC has a massive network on 70-cm. I'm looking to get back to Utah or to Montana. Someday I'll sit for general and extra, but I have to get back to America first.

KE5HLQ

Sent from my Nexus 6P using OB Talk mobile app
 

ExGEO

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Contributor I

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New Port Richey, FL
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KE5HLQ/AG
I run a Yaesu FT-2900R in my XO rig. Lots of power and extremely robust, but it's limited to 2-meter only. I have several HTs that will run 2m/70cm, but it's impractical for the kind of travel I do. I should be heading out that way in about 6-8 weeks provided everything goes well with work. I'll take a look as I get closer. What are the main organizations and clubs out there?

Sent from my Nexus 6P using OB Talk mobile app
 

UtahOverlander

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There are the normal amateur radio clubs. Salt Lake City has an active one. I belong to the Wasatch Back Tri-County Amateur Radio Club. This includes Morgan, Summit, and Wasatch Counties. There are others all over the state. You can also join some of the local and state emergency communication groups like ARES an RACES. Many ways to be active with this hobby. Let me know if you need any specific information.

Todd
W5MTN