Sleeping Bags

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MOAK

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Many many years ago we bought a pair of inexpensive bags from LL Bean. They served us very well, and still do, but as they are both rated at 35+ degrees. I thought it high time to invest in a pair of really really good bags as we were planning this southwest tour in March and early April.. After months of research and hand wringing I settled upon the Big Agnus line.. We bought the him and hers rated at 15 degrees. We also bought the therma-rest neo air inflatable pads, which as all the reviews stated, would make those bags live up to their 15 degree rating... The bags are extraordinarily comfortable and compress nicely for stowage in our trailer and in our backpacks, but 15 degrees ?? NOT,, we shivered our butts off at 22 degrees.. In all reality, the bags perform really well down to about 25.. We ended up buying a propane tent heater to aid us for those nights below 25.. I'm just a bit disappointed with Big Agnus..
 

gsdog2

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Contributor I

60
Try the 3 piece military surplus bags. Used them for years. I even added a microfleece liner and never been better. I got mine used from sportsmansguide.com for around 99 bucks. I don't think it was ever used. Since they are so warm (with the right sleep wear) we use Oz tent Rivergum bags during the warmer months.
 

IronPercheron

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I drive where I am going... then live out of this bag... or I drive close... then hoof it amd live out of this bag.

I lived out of my truck and a Molle for at least 85% of my deployment to Afghanistan. I was always on convoy ops.

Anyways... uploadfromtaptalk1459193058252.jpg

The sleep system serves me well, has for a long time in every circumstance.

I recommend it...

Sent from my SM-G920V using Tapatalk
 

NorthStar96

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Founder 500
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Advocate II



I drive where I am going... then live out of this bag... or I drive close... then hoof it amd live out of this bag.

I lived out of my truck and a Molle for at least 85% of my deployment to Afghanistan. I was always on convoy ops.

Anyways... View attachment 2793

The sleep system serves me well, has for a long time in every circumstance.

I recommend it...

Sent from my SM-G920V using Tapatalk
That a Kifaru Woobie there?
 

roamingtimber

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You should try a couple of sleeping bag liners. They run $50 to $70 and can add 10 to 25 degrees of comfort to any bag with minimal bulk and weight. I have a synthetic marmot 50 degree bag and a synthetic ll bean 20 degree bag. With the addition of my Sea to Summit Thermolite liner I can use just those two bags to be comfortable from 50 degrees down to zero with far less bulk and weight. I am a very warm sleeper though so i can't guarantee the same results.
 

mellowdave

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I agree completely, I'm a career Infantryman, and I was first issued the Woodland bag back in the late 90's to replace the old cotton and down ones. Those have been replaced by ACU, and shortly the ACU will be replaced with OCP (MultiCam) so both of the previous patterns are smoking good deals on the surplus market.

The system is made up of three parts, a patrol bag, a heavy bag, and a gore tex bivy. The patrol bag is good down to 30, the big bag is good down to zero, and combined they are good to sub zero. Now remember, we are talking military here, so comfort isn't the issue, its protection, I would say the patrol bag is good to around 4o by itself, and 30 for the big bag. All parts together are legitimately warm down to zero and below.

The only difference between the ACU and the Woodland is the colors, both heavy bags are black, the patrol bags are grey in the ACU, and green in the woodland, the bivy has either woodland, or ACU pattern covers on the goretex. They come with pretty nice stuff sacks, and I think they are rated at about 5lbs with all three components, and obviously lighter as you remove parts. If you sleep in a tent, the bivy is completely unnecessary.

I also have a Kifaru Woobie, and Im picking up a Doobie as a late birthday gift this year. those represent the first real improvement on the USGI Poncho liner ever. I like to use them over my bag on truly cold nights, and they are great for just sitting around the fire and whatnot.

I'll also point out that one of the very best tents I've ever used, from any manufacturer is the "Lite Fighter" one man, and two man tents. I was dubious when we first got them, but I've now purchased two for personal use. VERY VERY nice product. Maybe akin to something like an REI Halfdome but built to a much higher standard of quality, and less pricey.
 
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Byron Eby

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I have had my eyes on the Coleman Big Basin mummy bag sold on amazon. It is 0-20 degrees without down because i hate getting poked by feathers.
 

utspoolup

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I have a MSS it works, and can be had pretty cheap. After 8 years in the Marines and 15 years as a civie carrying shit on my back, I will say, that I would not carry a MSS in a backpack. Same with Wiggys, Wiggys are a little more expensive, I feel better constructed, more options, but still sucks to pack down and weighs a good amount. These are the "emergency bags" I keep in the garage hanging in laundry bags from the rafters just in case and it what the girls use when camping. I have the 40* outer, and 0 inner bags setups with the wiggys.

Since Im solo 99% of the time I go out, I spent a little more on my next sleep system, Kifaru MOB and slick bags. THESE ARE THE BEST sleeping bags I have found. Pack down considerably more than the MSS and Wiggys. I will have to find and reupload my photos for reference since Comcast dropped everything about a year ago. I have personally gone to sleep in these wet, slept warm, and awoke dry. They pack down like no other and using the Kifaru stuff sack it shapes it to a log to fit the bottom of a back instead of a ball. I have been using Kifaru stuff for 10 years now. I have a few packs, a few sleeping bags, a couple of shelters (which are also awesome FYI), a pair of woobies, and a box full of accessories. Everything they make is thought out well, tested by Patrick and several other prior to public announcement. Another item I use a ton is the Hill people gear Serape, it is a half zip 30* bag, poncho line (with head hole and hood) that can be zipped up the front to make a great coat and keep drafts down, HPG also makes great day packs and the best chest pouch on the market. I keep this in the raingler roof net inside my X and I find that it is used a lot.

But about 4 years ago, I stopped sleeping on the ground and moved to the trees using hammocks. My first setup with a Hennessy Hammock, but you will learn about cold butts fast, so I bought a jacks r better nest and top quilt (30*), and they worked for most my 3 season camping, but I have never slept better than I do in a hammock, so I wanted to continue that over to the winter. This takes research and experimenting. I originally modified my Hennessy with the team at 2QZQ to have the bottom entry still accessible, but had a full length zipper top added, so I can unzip in the winter for ease of access and adjust-ability of bottom quilt/ liners, then had a peak bag added to keep gloves/ beenie/ extra close at hand. Then had Adam and Jenny at Hammock gear build me a set of -10F top and bottom quilts. It was nice and I used it all winter. But the hammock was the sore spot in this setup, so I purchased a Warbonnet XLC dual layer hammock and supertarp, and expanded the summer insulation with a Hammock gear 30* quilt set.

I have not looked back since, truly amazing setups for my use. My daughter has used my old Hennessy setup and we have bunk bedded 2 hammocks on the same trees and under the same rainfly. She digs it and I hope that she keeps wanting to go outdoors with daddy.

Last month I bought a Tepui Autana RTT for my X and am figuring out the sleep situation on it, but I hope by the end of the summer to have a dozen or so trips done with it and hopefully this helps the family enjoy the outdoors a little more.

Give me a bit this weekend to reupload my photos of some of my packing adventures and Ill reply back soon.
 
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utspoolup

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Okay, I am having a little trouble finding some of the photos, but here you go with what I have found.

Before we begin, let me start by saying that I have no issues with the temp ratings of any of the bags (MSS, Wiggys, Kifaru). When I originally posted this on bladeforums and 24campfire, I also stated this, this is NOT a bashing thread, this is just a comparison. At the time, no one had compared the Kifaru bags to any others, and to be honest Kifaru bags are still not widely popular but for my uses, they are still my favorite bags to date. They do cost a bit but there are defiantly more expensive out there, however for what you pay for and get, they are a good value. What sucks.... wait time. On some things from Kifaru I have waited 4 months. But I also waited 6 months for the bumper for my truck, 14 months for a AR, 12 months for a 1911. So I am use to waiting. The plus side, USA made goodness. They use seamstress's around Wheatridge CO for manufacturing all their good. They are Berry Amendment Compliant which means everything used in the manufacturing of the gear can be traced back to the USA.

I also can not find the document I created listing weights, but the Kifaru is A LOT lighter than either the MSS pieces or the Wiggys. I am to busy to research it right now, so pardon my lazyness. For these photos I used the Kifaru bag and stuff sack compared to a equal length/ width/ temp Wiggys bag with Granite Gear tubular stuff sack (I really hate basketballs in my pack) the tube design allows for better fit and packing. But to each their own. I have pushed the limits on each individual bag out camping, so I can say the temp ratings are accurate in my uses.

First up we have a Kifaru slickbag, long/ wide, 0* temp rated, and one of there 5 string stuff sacks, If I remember correctly, it is a medium size, but don't quote me on that. It is compared to a long wide Wiggys bag also 0* rated and a Grate gear tubular stuff sack.

0* vs 0*



0* vs 0* prior compression, yes, there is already a difference



0* vs 0* after compression, now you see why I pack these now



20* vs 20*



This was something I did at the end of the photoset, I took the Kifaru 0* AND 20* and compressed it against just the 20* bag from Wiggys, this weight was a bit more for the Kifaru but you are carrying 2 bags and when sleeved inside each other they are rated to -35F if I am not mistaking, so 55* warmer than a equally sized package!




And just for fun, here are some of the shelter photos. I have an 8man Tipi with large stove, and a supertarp with annex and a small stove. I also own a sawtooth but can not locate those photos right now.





And the supertarp, still my favorite shelter, by them, the thing is small, as in like coffee mug sized and uses my trekking poles to set up. Can be used with a stove and is plenty big for 2 people and gear.
 

rixham

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I was Air Force for 15 years, so I'm not familiar with all of this "carrying shit on my back" stuff, we had busses and hotels. lol!

I love my Nemo Strato Loft Down sleeping bag. Packs down wonderfully and has a pocket in the back for an air mattress so it won't move durng the night while you sleep.
 
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mellowdave

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Okay, I am having a little trouble finding some of the photos, but here you go with what I have found.

Before we begin, let me start by saying that I have no issues with the temp ratings of any of the bags (MSS, Wiggys, Kifaru). When I originally posted this on bladeforums and 24campfire, I also stated this, this is NOT a bashing thread, this is just a comparison. At the time, no one had compared the Kifaru bags to any others, and to be honest Kifaru bags are still not widely popular but for my uses, they are still my favorite bags to date. They do cost a bit but there are defiantly more expensive out there, however for what you pay for and get, they are a good value. What sucks.... wait time. On some things from Kifaru I have waited 4 months. But I also waited 6 months for the bumper for my truck, 14 months for a AR, 12 months for a 1911. So I am use to waiting. The plus side, USA made goodness. They use seamstress's around Wheatridge CO for manufacturing all their good. They are Berry Amendment Compliant which means everything used in the manufacturing of the gear can be traced back to the USA.

I also can not find the document I created listing weights, but the Kifaru is A LOT lighter than either the MSS pieces or the Wiggys. I am to busy to research it right now, so pardon my lazyness. For these photos I used the Kifaru bag and stuff sack compared to a equal length/ width/ temp Wiggys bag with Granite Gear tubular stuff sack (I really hate basketballs in my pack) the tube design allows for better fit and packing. But to each their own. I have pushed the limits on each individual bag out camping, so I can say the temp ratings are accurate in my uses.

First up we have a Kifaru slickbag, long/ wide, 0* temp rated, and one of there 5 string stuff sacks, If I remember correctly, it is a medium size, but don't quote me on that. It is compared to a long wide Wiggys bag also 0* rated and a Grate gear tubular stuff sack.

0* vs 0*



0* vs 0* prior compression, yes, there is already a difference



0* vs 0* after compression, now you see why I pack these now



20* vs 20*



This was something I did at the end of the photoset, I took the Kifaru 0* AND 20* and compressed it against just the 20* bag from Wiggys, this weight was a bit more for the Kifaru but you are carrying 2 bags and when sleeved inside each other they are rated to -35F if I am not mistaking, so 55* warmer than a equally sized package!




And just for fun, here are some of the shelter photos. I have an 8man Tipi with large stove, and a supertarp with annex and a small stove. I also own a sawtooth but can not locate those photos right now.





And the supertarp, still my favorite shelter, by them, the thing is small, as in like coffee mug sized and uses my trekking poles to set up. Can be used with a stove and is plenty big for 2 people and gear.
I love my Kifaru stuff, and I've been seriously considering a tipi to keep in the cruiser.
 
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Vyscera

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I just got a XL Marmot. at 6' 3" the standard bags were a tad short. Otherwise I would have fallen back to the familiar US Mil sleep system. That thing is impressive.
 

STPICKENS

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From what I understand of sleeping bag ratings the temp to which they state is a survivable temp not a comfort temp. So if it states 15 degrees that means you will survive down that low but not comfortably. typically its 10 to 15 degrees warmer is the low comfort temp. that for a sleeping bag to perform the best you should not wear a lot of clothing either. less is better because it will absorb and radiate your body heat more efficiently.

I have been camping in all types of weather all year long since i was crawling and only use a 32 degree bag but i have been as low as 15 degrees with it. it was cold but with a fleece blanket wrapped around my head and sholders and a wool army blanket over the bag i was pretty content. No sweat shirt only beanie and gym shorts on.

not everyone will agree with my statement here but that is what i have learned over my 35 years of camping.
 

raundhaus

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Advocate II

From what I understand of sleeping bag ratings the temp to which they state is a survivable temp not a comfort temp. So if it states 15 degrees that means you will survive down that low but not comfortably. typically its 10 to 15 degrees warmer is the low comfort temp. that for a sleeping bag to perform the best you should not wear a lot of clothing either. less is better because it will absorb and radiate your body heat more efficiently.

I have been camping in all types of weather all year long since i was crawling and only use a 32 degree bag but i have been as low as 15 degrees with it. it was cold but with a fleece blanket wrapped around my head and sholders and a wool army blanket over the bag i was pretty content. No sweat shirt only beanie and gym shorts on.

not everyone will agree with my statement here but that is what i have learned over my 35 years of camping.
You are pretty much correct. The official standard for rating is comfort in the bag while wearing socks, long underwear, AND a beanie hat. Since many people sleep in much less, bags rarely seem to be comfortable at their rated temps.
I'm no expert, just read it a long time ago and never forgot.
If folks are wanting opinions on good bags, I can only speak to my Kelty Cosmic Down 20* bag. For $100 there is nothing else out there that competes. For more money, sure, there are many superior bags, but I think the Kelty is a very good bang for your buck!

Sent from my SM-T560NU using OB Talk mobile app
 
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squishware

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I have a Golite Ultralight 3 season down quilt (800 fill). Good till about freezing when I wear my down anorak also. A quilt is superior to a tent in that you can vent in warmer temperatures and it had inherently less bulk and weight than a comparable bag.
Down can be a bit of trouble in wet weather so I got my kids the Mountain Hardwear Lamina 20F bags and have been pleased with their performance and durability the past 5 years.
 

coffeeshark

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I, too, use an issued sleeping system, just because it's easy. There are better, lighter options out there, and I was looking at getting a Kelty dri-down bag until I got the new issued one and said forget it.

I have a Sierra Designs Light Year 1 that I like. They've changed the design a little since I got mine, but it's probably still good. Their Mountain Guide winter tent is similar to the ones I used in Alaska, just made of lighter stuff, and is probably good for deeper cold if it's like the quality I got in my three-season tent. They are pricey though--$370 for the Mountain Guide and $170 for the Light Year.