Rude? Yay or nay

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Lothar

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Albeit imperfectly , I try not to attribute to malice what can easily be attributed to ignorance. It sounds like they were the latter, and consequently rude. As to what I would do with the benefit of 20/20 hindsight... I'd probably ask for them to kill the ATVs and walk it in to avoid disturbing anyone.
 
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tjZ06

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I guess I'll break the echo chamber here... no, not rude. They stopped and asked if it was okay with you, if you had a problem with them riding in you could have said so at that point. Now, I imagine it never occurred to you that they would ride, not walk in. But you have to remember it probably never occurred to them that somebody would be annoyed by them riding their ATVs through the camp.

-TJ
 

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I guess I'll break the echo chamber here... no, not rude. They stopped and asked if it was okay with you, if you had a problem with them riding in you could have said so at that point. Now, I imagine it never occurred to you that they would ride, not walk in. But you have to remember it probably never occurred to them that somebody would be annoyed by them riding their ATVs through the camp.

-TJ
Interesting, backwards logic, but interesting. If they are unaware that riding noisy things into another’s camp would be ok, then they would also lack the common courtesy that normal human beings would display when invited to another’s home as a guest. If my host doesn’t cuss, swear, drink or smoke weed, then maybe I shouldn’t either. If I put someone on the spot by asking myself in, and they being generous of nature, would say yes, then I went into their home, as a self invited guest and behaved contrary to their norms, as stated above, then who, may I ask, is the a-hole? The generous person that would open his doors, or the takers, the ones that take advantage of the generosity of others? you make it sound as if I am wrong for being of a generous nature. The very fact that they even had the audacity to ask is beyond rude. I’ve given this a little too much thought, I’m sure, but if this is the new normal in our society, I want nothing to do with it. Kindness, generosity, thoughtfulness & self awareness are positive traits, I’ll stick with them..
 
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tjZ06

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Interesting, backwards logic, but interesting. If they are unaware that riding noisy things into another’s camp would be ok, then they would also lack the common courtesy that normal human beings would display when invited to another’s home as a guest. If my host doesn’t cuss, swear, drink or smoke weed, then maybe I shouldn’t either. If I put someone on the spot by asking myself in, and they being generous of nature, would say yes, then I went into their home, as a self invited guest and behaved contrary to their norms, as stated above, then who, may I ask, is the a-hole? The generous person that would open his doors, or the takers, the ones that take advantage of the generosity of others? you make it sound as if I am wrong for being of a generous nature. The very fact that they even had the audacity to ask is beyond rude. I’ve given this a little too much thought, I’m sure, but if this is the new normal in our society, I want nothing to do with it. Kindness, generosity, thoughtfulness & self awareness are positive traits, I’ll stick with them..
You do see the irony in calling my opinion on the matter "backwards logic" in a thread about being rude, don't you?

My understanding is this was on public land where OVSs (Off Highway Vehicles... not sure that is what they're called everywhere) are completely legal. I simply disagree that asking was an audacious move when they had just as much right to be in that area as anyone else. The fact that they asked means they were trying to be considerate, and they only proceeded with "permission."

The house analogy is completely inapplicable in this situation, and is plainly a strawman. A house is owned by the homeowner and others don't have an equal right to use the home. You don't own the public lands, or the campsite you were on. I think asking the rest of the world to modify their perfectly legal activities around your expectations is what is actually audacious.

I also think you're reaching pretty hard to link this with some societal shift. Sure, I agree our society is rapidly degrading, but I hardly see this incident as an example of it. I tend to be more worried about transvestites teaching 6 year olds about sex changes than an ATV'er riding through camp. I'm sure people rode motocycles/ATCs/quads through public lands where someone happened to be camping approximately 15 seconds after the first one was produced... we just didn't have the internet for people to make it known to tens of thousands of strangers, and collectively complain.

Had they done a bunch of donuts, caused excessive dust intentionally, or otherwise demonstrated a disregard for the your camp I would feel differently. But as described they were respectful and courteous. You had a chance to say "sure, have a look, but if you don't mind could you leave the ATVs here and just walk through?" and didn't do so. Why should/would anyone assume the presence of an ATV would be so traumatizing?

Honestly, it's nothing if not laughable that you talk about the ATV riders' audacity, my backward thinking, and deem the whole incident as exceedingly rude and a sign of a failed society while tossing insults at strangers on the internet...

-TJ
 
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MidOH

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I think it's funny that the OP expected them to stop and get off the ATV's. Why would anyone do that? Nobody does that. You just ride though the grass, point and say: ''that's where we used to camp'', then tear off. Motorcross boots are useless for walking.

That's not how it works, that's not how any of this works. Lol. So yeah, you totally gave them permission to ride through.


No harm no foul. Them's the rules.
 

JimmyD

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I may be new to the overland game but not new to camping. That was definitely uncalled for on their part. Common courtesy for someone else’s site would be to shut the machines down and politely ask. That would have made me hot!!
 

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You do see the irony in calling my opinion on the matter "backwards logic" in a thread about being rude, don't you?

My understanding is this was on public land where OVSs (Off Highway Vehicles... not sure that is what they're called everywhere) are completely legal. I simply disagree that asking was an audacious move when they had just as much right to be in that area as anyone else. The fact that they asked means they were trying to be considerate, and they only proceeded with "permission."

The house analogy is completely inapplicable in this situation, and is plainly a strawman. A house is owned by the homeowner and others don't have an equal right to use the home. You don't own the public lands, or the campsite you were on. I think asking the rest of the world to modify their perfectly legal activities around your expectations is what is actually audacious.

I also think you're reaching pretty hard to link this with some societal shift. Sure, I agree our society is rapidly degrading, but I hardly see this incident as an example of it. I tend to be more worried about transvestites teaching 6 year olds about sex changes than an ATV'er riding through camp. I'm sure people rode motocycles/ATCs/quads through public lands where someone happened to be camping approximately 15 seconds after the first one was produced... we just didn't have the internet for people to make it known to tens of thousands of strangers, and collectively complain.

Had they done a bunch of donuts, caused excessive dust intentionally, or otherwise demonstrated a disregard for the your camp I would feel differently. But as described they were respectful and courteous. You had a chance to say "sure, have a look, but if you don't mind could you leave the ATVs here and just walk through?" and didn't do so. Why should/would anyone assume the presence of an ATV would be so traumatizing?

Honestly, it's nothing if not laughable that you talk about the ATV riders' audacity, my backward thinking, and deem the whole incident as exceedingly rude and a sign of a failed society while tossing insults at strangers on the internet...
-TJ
Interesting? is a complement. Backward logic? Only backward from the herd. Personal insult? No. Differing opinions? Yes. Bad analogy? Maybe, but a campsite is one’s temporary home and I was grasping for an analogy on the fly. And what, pray tell, do transvestites have to do with any of this? If you took what I wrote as a personal insult, don’t, because it’s not personal, nor was it insulting. People, and good friends have commented on my interesting backwards thinking my entire life and I’ve always taken it as a left handed kind of compliment, because that’s what it is.
 

JakJak

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I really try not to judge people, I try to only observe. We were camped at a dispersed sight recently, tucked away, nice and private. My wife and I went for a walk after supper. Before we got even a few yards a couple of ATVs came roaring up to us. They stopped and the lead driver started yelling at me over the noise of the engines and through her headgear. I indicated I couldn’t hear a word she was saying. She reluctantly turned the engine off and asked, if we minded if she took her friend back to our camp to show him where she had camped before. What am I supposed to say? No? They were already in our camp. Unfortunately, they did not walk the rest of the short trail in, they road in on their machines, starteling my brother in law. They never got off of their machines, they road around the camp, then left. Proper camp etiquette would have been for them to shut down their machines, walk to the edge of camp, and upon communication, wait for an invite. And people wonder why we avoid campsites within a hundred miles of any populated areas. Rude or not? What’s your verdict?
Yup.. super rude
 

freak4life

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Let it go, no one was hurt, if your in law is a man of Christian faith then he should remember some Scriptures that teach about hospitality and that he is to consider others more important than him. The latter is what I concentrate on while driving as it stops my road irritation stone cold dead. :)
That they asked is a considerate move that many would not have made. Have a great day.
Blessings
 
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Tripin75

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I learned something from this thread. If you are going to be hospitable and allow people into your campsite, state your invitation limitations.
1. No riding through the camp on your ATVs, bicycles, or maybe remove shoes before entering.
2. No access to the fridge. no free beer.
3. ...

Or expect to be offended by something.
 
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trail_runn4r

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I really try not to judge people, I try to only observe. We were camped at a dispersed sight recently, tucked away, nice and private. My wife and I went for a walk after supper. Before we got even a few yards a couple of ATVs came roaring up to us. They stopped and the lead driver started yelling at me over the noise of the engines and through her headgear. I indicated I couldn’t hear a word she was saying. She reluctantly turned the engine off and asked, if we minded if she took her friend back to our camp to show him where she had camped before. What am I supposed to say? No? They were already in our camp. Unfortunately, they did not walk the rest of the short trail in, they road in on their machines, starteling my brother in law. They never got off of their machines, they road around the camp, then left. Proper camp etiquette would have been for them to shut down their machines, walk to the edge of camp, and upon communication, wait for an invite. And people wonder why we avoid campsites within a hundred miles of any populated areas. Rude or not? What’s your verdict?
Definitely rude.
 

MOAK

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Let it go, no one was hurt, if your in law is a man of Christian faith then he should remember some Scriptures that teach about hospitality and that he is to consider others more important than him. The latter is what I concentrate on while driving as it stops my road irritation stone cold dead. :)
That they asked is a considerate move that many would not have made. Have a great day.
Blessings
Wow, I let it go moments after the interaction. You are correct, some people would have just road on in. I would naturally assume anyone rude enough to ride right in to be drunk or meth heads. I do however enjoy engaging in thoughtful debate on issues of humanity, and why humanity seems to take steps backwards on occasion. You must refer to scripture to stay under control and not express road rage at other drivers? If that gets you home safely and works for you, then keep using that tool. Me? 3.75 million miles, 1 moving violation, 0 accidents, 0 damage. Simple rules of kindness, patience, and self awareness along with safe driving technics and an understanding that drivers of commutor cars and pleasure driving are not professionals and must be looked after, enable me to brag about my professional driving record. What does this have to do with the subject? I learned to “let go” of people’s, ( including my own ) mistakes and bad mannerisms a very long time ago.
 

tjZ06

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Interesting? is a complement. Backward logic? Only backward from the herd. Personal insult? No. Differing opinions? Yes. Bad analogy? Maybe, but a campsite is one’s temporary home and I was grasping for an analogy on the fly. And what, pray tell, do transvestites have to do with any of this? If you took what I wrote as a personal insult, don’t, because it’s not personal, nor was it insulting. People, and good friends have commented on my interesting backwards thinking my entire life and I’ve always taken it as a left handed kind of compliment, because that’s what it is.
Fair 'nough... let's chalk it up to misunderstanding and the nature of communicating via written word without the advantage of cues like body language and tone of voice. At the end of the day we can completely disagree, and that's fine. Being able to (politely) debate and do our best to support our viewpoint, but accept we may never sway the other person is something I think we'd both agree is becoming lost in society.

-TJ
 
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freak4life

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pretty sure those same scriptures also teach about judging others...
No, we are called to be discerning of actions, the judging that Scriptures reject, that you may be thinking about, is whether or not someone is saved. No one knows a mans heart but God.
 

pluton

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I've noticed that ATVers seem to be reluctant to get off/out of their machines and walk. I've seen them at state park campgrounds jumping on the ATV so they could ride it up to the soft drink vending machine at the campground HQ building.
 
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I've noticed that ATVers seem to be reluctant to get off/out of their machines and walk. I've seen them at state park campgrounds jumping on the ATV so they could ride it up to the soft drink vending machine at the campground HQ building.
Oh, man. What can I say? Laziness at its finest. But to be honest, they might be in love with their ATVs. Sometimes I wish I could drive to the bakery 150m away from home only to drive my lovely Xc70