Pull Out Kitchen/storage building Materials | OVERLAND BOUND COMMUNITY

Pull Out Kitchen/storage building Materials

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rwade

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Contributor I

60
Frenchtown, NJ, USA
First Name
Robert
Last Name
Fakelmann
So, i am new here and i assume there are multiple threads on this subject, but I'm still learning to navigate site, and i apologize in advance if this is a wore out subject.

I consider myself a DIY type guy, i much rather build my own then purchase.. I am looking to start a slide out kitchen/storage system in a Jeep TJ and hopefully soon in a larger overlander i plan to purchase this winter, and i am unsure best materials to use.

Here are my ideas:

- Foam board wrapped with Canvas (foam board for Compression strength and Canvas glued for tensile strength, very reasonable and extremely lite)
- 1/2" or 3/4' Marine grade birch, with a heavy sealer for moisture protection (simple and reasonable, but relatively heavy)
- 1/2" or 3/4" PVC Veranda boards ( very expensive and will require additional bracing, but 100% moisture proof)


Looking to get other more experienced to overlanding thoughts and opinions?

Again, if its been brought up a bunch and i missed it, i apologize.

Thanks!
 

Pathfinder I

1,212
Canada
First Name
Craig
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PereferNotToSay
Is your plan for your panels to support any loads, or are you just looking for flat surfaces to attach to a frame?

A lot of folks will use 1/2" plywood. If it's inside, even a few coats of Verathane will make it weather resistant enough to last longer than the car it's in. I built mine this way using a Kreg Jig, so the boards in this example were both the structure (providing strength to the box) and the flat surfaces. The downside is it was heavy.

I've not yet done the math on this to know if will actually save me weight, but my Mk II version will be built using aluminum extrusion (the thin 80/20 material) as a structural frame. As for panels, I've considered 1/4 plywood with fibreglass and resin -- similar to the foam board idea you mentioned, basically making my own composite panels. However, this is a lot of of work, and these panels are likely not going to be properly flat which will make tossing things on the top annoying. So instead I'm likely to use carpeted 1/2 plywood for the top (flat surface that needs to be somewhat structural) and any infill panels that are not structural, but just to "contain" the stuff, I will use Aluminum Composite Panels (ABS sandwiched between two thin sheets of aluminum). This Extrusion/Aluminum Composite construction is how I did my truck cap and it's both super strong and very light -- the cap weighs a lot less than the drawer unit under it.

 

Road

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.
I've learned over the years that both 1/2 and 3/4 ply materials in a vehicle is most always overkill, thickness wise. I use 3/8 (or closest metric equiv) birch ply for all cabinetry. Reduces weight, easier to use, and less expensive.

I even just use 1/2 for the floor. Doesn't have to be marine grade or expensive imported.

I love Minwax's Polycrylic Satin as an extremely tough, durable, long-lasting and can-take-a-beating finish. Even though water-based (super easy cleanup), it's a rugged, easy to apply, finish.

Start with a clean, dust-free surface and foam brush on a good even coat. When dry, give it a light sand with a 220 pad (I quarter-fold mine from half sheets); tack cloth or otherwise make dust-free, and give it another coat. Dries quick. If it's a surface that will see more wear, I often give it three initial coats upon installation.

I've had the set-up shown in the below image for almost ten years, finished as described above, exposed to all kinds of extreme weather around No America when my rear and side doors are open, with no premature failure. It's worked so well I'm using the same exact materials and finish when I add taller side cabts, trays for fishing and photography gear, and upper cabts.

interior_2802-900n.jpeg
.
 

rwade

Rank 0

Contributor I

60
Frenchtown, NJ, USA
First Name
Robert
Last Name
Fakelmann
Is your plan for your panels to support any loads, or are you just looking for flat surfaces to attach to a frame?

A lot of folks will use 1/2" plywood. If it's inside, even a few coats of Verathane will make it weather resistant enough to last longer than the car it's in. I built mine this way using a Kreg Jig, so the boards in this example were both the structure (providing strength to the box) and the flat surfaces. The downside is it was heavy.

I've not yet done the math on this to know if will actually save me weight, but my Mk II version will be built using aluminum extrusion (the thin 80/20 material) as a structural frame. As for panels, I've considered 1/4 plywood with fibreglass and resin -- similar to the foam board idea you mentioned, basically making my own composite panels. However, this is a lot of of work, and these panels are likely not going to be properly flat which will make tossing things on the top annoying. So instead I'm likely to use carpeted 1/2 plywood for the top (flat surface that needs to be somewhat structural) and any infill panels that are not structural, but just to "contain" the stuff, I will use Aluminum Composite Panels (ABS sandwiched between two thin sheets of aluminum). This Extrusion/Aluminum Composite construction is how I did my truck cap and it's both super strong and very light -- the cap weighs a lot less than the drawer unit under it.

I just checked out that site, material looks great, and not too expensive. Thank you!!

To be honest im in beginning stages, but i think i will TIG a AL frame and use that as most of structural support.
 
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rwade

Rank 0

Contributor I

60
Frenchtown, NJ, USA
First Name
Robert
Last Name
Fakelmann
.
I've learned over the years that both 1/2 and 3/4 ply materials in a vehicle is most always overkill, thickness wise. I use 3/8 (or closest metric equiv) birch ply for all cabinetry. Reduces weight, easier to use, and less expensive.

I even just use 1/2 for the floor. Doesn't have to be marine grade or expensive imported.

I love Minwax's Polycrylic Satin as an extremely tough, durable, long-lasting and can-take-a-beating finish. Even though water-based (super easy cleanup), it's a rugged, easy to apply, finish.

Start with a clean, dust-free surface and foam brush on a good even coat. When dry, give it a light sand with a 220 pad (I quarter-fold mine from half sheets); tack cloth or otherwise make dust-free, and give it another coat. Dries quick. If it's a surface that will see more wear, I often give it three initial coats upon installation.

I've had the set-up shown in the below image for almost ten years, finished as described above, exposed to all kinds of extreme weather around No America when my rear and side doors are open, with no premature failure. It's worked so well I'm using the same exact materials and finish when I add taller side cabts, trays for fishing and photography gear, and upper cabts.

View attachment 212669
.
looks great, i didnt even think of 3/8" but for this application its plenty strong enough.. Thank You
 

MazeVX

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So I'm not really sure what you are planning to do but usually you go for 3/8 - 1/2 material if you use plywood, just do some corner bracing etc. Strength comes from construction not material thickness, thick material only makes stuff heavy...
You can also use aluminum extrusion profiles and fill them with light sandwich materials.
 
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El-Dracho

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Pioneer I

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The living interireur in my Landy is built with 12mm/ 1/2'' birch veneer plywood panels. After more than 10 years and about 300,000km on the tracks of this world, it is still in top condition. This shows me that this material is very stable and resistant. I like wood, it makes it homely somehow. And it's not too heavy either because I have saved weight, for example, by building the fixed storage boxes/seat benches without a rear wall, and the rear wall is formed by the vehicle's existing outer wall.