On Call w/ Chris Episode 02: Trauma vs First Aid

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Joel S

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I took a few day wilderness first aid, and then later down the road I spent a week to get WFR certed. Taking the WFR course was such a huge help, especially because I was a mountain bike instructor at the time. It’s also helped when I’ve crashed on a bike pretty bad, and I could tell if I needed to find an urgent care center or not
 

Nickzero

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Perfect explanation of the comparison between 'Trauma and First Aid'.

Regarding trauma, starting with the absolute vital areas and key injury and assessing down from there. This is essential because most of the time the patient could be in shock and only notice / feel one area of injury. Through examining / quickly scanning the entire body head to tow with addition of exposure / medications etc. you are acquiring a greater amount of information about the patients status. This could ultimately be used to relay to EMT's who arrive later; providing them with a status report. You never know when or if the patient could loose consciousness there for gathering as much info as possible can assist with the proper medical attention. Thanks for the vid! - Nick
 

DrRobert

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Its second episode time! This time, Chris is talking Trauma vs First aid, and some of the mindset and med kit implications.

Hey Chris, thanks for taking the time to make these videos. Keep up the good work! The area of "emergency kits" has been a hobby of mine for a while and I'm constantly tweaking mine based on things I read or see (or experience). I really appreciated the video you had about what's in your "trauma" bag. I totally agree that you never can have enough gauze and compression bandages! The same goes for latex gloves and glasses...been there. In this video (trauma vs. first aid), It would have been nice to have a couple of props handy; namely, your trauma kit and your first aid kit. You don't have to go into great detail about either - but it would be nice to point them out and give a short summary of their contents without dwelling on it. For those of us that are novices having a visual aid can help create a frame of reference for what we're trying to do. For example, for the longest time I was struggling with the idea that my trauma kit and first aid kit were packed together in the same case. Making them separate, which I suppose should have been obvious, was a great idea.

If you're taking suggestions for videos (or creating a post here), I'd be interested in your guidance on where to get a) first aid training and b) basic trauma training without diving into getting an EMT certification. Your ABCs (DE) are useful but in my experience there's a big difference between watching a video (even a very informative one) and actually practicing how to splint a limb or use a triangle bandage. Most training that I've seen is for people that want to become EMTs and it's a big investment and time (and money). Is there some other path for those of us that are novices but want to know more?

Thanks again!
 
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KJOHNSTER

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Hey Chris, thanks for taking the time to make these videos. Keep up the good work! The area of "emergency kits" has been a hobby of mine for a while and I'm constantly tweaking mine based on things I read or see (or experience). I really appreciated the video you had about what's in your "trauma" bag. I totally agree that you never can have enough gauze and compression bandages! The same goes for latex gloves and glasses...been there. In this video (trauma vs. first aid), It would have been nice to have a couple of props handy; namely, your trauma kit and your first aid kit. You don't have to go into great detail about either - but it would be nice to point them out and give a short summary of their contents without dwelling on it. For those of us that are novices having a visual aid can help create a frame of reference for what we're trying to do. For example, for the longest time I was struggling with the idea that my trauma kit and first aid kit were packed together in the same case. Making them separate, which I suppose should have been obvious, was a great idea.

If you're taking suggestions for videos (or creating a post here), I'd be interested in your guidance on where to get a) first aid training and b) basic trauma training without diving into getting an EMT certification. Your ABCs (DE) are useful but in my experience there's a big difference between watching a video (even a very informative one) and actually practicing how to splint a limb or use a triangle bandage. Most training that I've seen is for people that want to become EMTs and it's a big investment and time (and money). Is there some other path for those of us that are novices but want to know more?

Thanks again!
Hi Robert - Here's a video that covers what Chris keeps in his 'trauma kit'