On Call w/ Chris Episode 01: CPR

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Michael

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Hey all! This is a new series called "On Call with Chris"! This is where Chris will answer questions you have about Trauma and First Aid care! This first episode, Chris talks CPR while...you guessed it...he's on call!

Let us know what you think!

 

LtShorty

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Hey all! This is a new series called "On Call with Chris"! This is where Chris will answer questions you have about Trauma and First Aid care! This first episode, Chris talks CPR while...you guessed it...he's on call!

Let us know what you think!

Fantastic Doc! I am enjoying your down to earth videos! I have just retired from 34 years in the fire service and have worked with a few doctors over the years. Some doctors do not have the teaching gene. Your ability to teach at the basic level is awesome! Thank you for taking the time to get the first aid/ Trauma education out to the overland community! I hope to meet you some day out on the trail!
 

LtShorty

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Fantastic Doc! I am enjoying your down to earth videos! I have just retired from 34 years in the fire service and have worked with a few doctors over the years. Some doctors do not have the teaching gene. Your ability to teach at the basic level is awesome! Thank you for taking the time to get the first aid/ Trauma education out to the overland community! I hope to meet you some day out on the trail!

Short CPR Video
 

texascascio

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That was awesome and straightforward and thanks for the Amazon tip on the masks. I ordered two for my huge medic bag.
I don't know if others do this as well but, I have a HUGE medical bag full of stuff I have collected ( I don't keep items out of date) with many items out of my knowledge areas like IV's, syringes, and such. My thoughts are even if I don't know how to use some items, there might be someone at "the scene" that does and maybe I could save a life just by having something someone with the knowledge could use to save that life.
I have the room so I figured carry all I can. I have other med bags full of stuff I know how to use. But when I travel off-grid or on the trail, I always have this huge bag on hand. Friends call it my "end of days" bag it has so much stuff.
 

mjherron

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Michael and Chris, thank you for starting this type of thread. After 24 yrs as a US Navy Hospital Corpsman and spending most of my time serving with the US Marine Corps I retired. A lot of training, teaching, and doing. The only thing I would add that a lot of people don’t take into consideration is scene safety. Is the scene safe for the bystander to start anything other than calling 911. If it’s not don’t attempt. One victim is bad enough. Two is worse. Just my thoughts. I will be following this forum and it has made me rethink what I need to do and that is to get back into First Aid and CPR training. Thank you!!
 

El Solis

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Thanks for the awesome video. First time I've heard anyone mention NOT to hold your breath while performing CPR, I see that all the time in regular certification classes.
I know, it’s crazy. I’ve seen a doc trying to intubate have to stop and sit down because they were holding their breath, it was crazy.
 

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Excellent videos, you can never have too much information and training for first aid.

I am interested though that you say 100 compressions with 2 breaths; I was taught 30/2. Any reasoning in particular why one is right/wrong?
 
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Jim SoG

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WOW How in the heck did I not see this? Now I got a series to watch and catch up with.....Love it.

Great information and a teaching or refresher in an easy format.

This could be expanded to other subjects like recovery or emergency comms, or whatever.......

Jim
 
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El Solis

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Excellent videos, you can never have too much information and training for first aid.

I am interested though that you say 100 compressions with 2 breaths; I was taught 30/2. Any reasoning in particular why one is right/wrong?
Current teaching is 100/2 at a higher rate of compressions compared to before. Goal of 100 a minute. This provides a better pump action. The 2 breaths stays the same as that isn’t as important and requires stopping the compressions when doing this alone. Now if you have two people, one should do compressions at 100/min and the other can do the 2 breaths every 45-60 seconds.
 

LtShorty

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Excellent videos, you can never have too much information and training for first aid.

I am interested though that you say 100 compressions with 2 breaths; I was taught 30/2. Any reasoning in particular why one is right/wrong?
30 compressions to two breaths (mouth-to-mouth as per step 7) aiming for 100 compressions and no more than eight breaths per minute, OR. If unwilling to do mouth-to-mouth, perform continuous compressions at a rate of approximately 100 per minute.
 

HEYElliott

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30 compressions to two breaths (mouth-to-mouth as per step 7) aiming for 100 compressions and no more than eight breaths per minute, OR. If unwilling to do mouth-to-mouth, perform continuous compressions at a rate of approximately 100 per minute.
See my confusion it seems like you and @El_solis are saying different things. I did learn that compressions are more important than the breaths though so ill keep that in mind.
 

El Solis

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Same but different. In all honesty don’t worry about the actual ratio. Nothing will happen if you go 27 breaths or 94 compressions. It’s something to guide you. We don’t count in the hospital. Pick which one you think will work for you. Either 30 compressions to 2 breaths or 100 compressions to 2 breaths.

For normal urban CPR compression only is adequate. For us in the backcountry it is not. You have to do mouth to mouth.

And unlike the movies, in reality once someone has a traumatic arrest in the field they rarely come back. I’ll have to double check but the national rate of return of spontaneous circulation (getting a sustainable pulse back) after traumatic arrest with CPR is less than 20% and overall survival is less than 10% so we fight for those few. And that is with EMS available.
 

slomatt

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During CPR training someone once recommended singing "Stayin Alive" by the Bee Gees in your head (or out loud) since the tempo is 103 beats per minute. Personally I find this is a good way to easily remember the rate for compressions.
 
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