OB Frequencies List

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Teague

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Influencer II

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I've seen this on other sites, where we make a master list of the most common frequencies. Since we're so spread out maybe organize it by region?

HAM
  • National Simplex Calling
    • 1.25M: 223.50
    • 2M: 146.52
    • 70cm: 446.00
    • 33cm: 906.50
    • 23cm: 1294.500
  • Misc
    • NOAA: 162.550, 162.400, 162.475, 162.425, 162.450, 162.500, 162.525

CB
  • Southwest
    • Ch 4, 16

  • Emergency/Distress
    • Ch 9
GMRS/FRS

Marine
  • Emergency/distress
    • Ch 16
 
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1Louder

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Steward I

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Please don't say 146.46. Oh please pretty please.

Sigh that's what most 4x4 groups use. Sometimes two individuals like to talk for hours on that one. Main thing with HAM is learn your radio and learn how to manually tune other frequencies so you can easily switch once your group is together.

CB - 16 and 4 seem to be popular in AZ
 

4xFar Adventures

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I'll say it.

We used 146.460 on the OTG convoy.

National Simplex Calling Frequency is 146.520

Having a secondary/alternate frequency is always a good option for a larger group or in an area with heavy radio traffic.
 

1Louder

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Steward I

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I'll say it.

We used 146.460 on the OTG convoy.

National Simplex Calling Frequency is 146.520

Having a secondary/alternate frequency is always a good option for a larger group or in an area with heavy radio traffic.
I'm putting you I timeout for 5 minutes. It would have been 10 but you also support knowing alternate frequencies. [emoji3]

IMHO 146.46 should be where you connect with someone but then move to an alternate frequency.
 

VCeXpedition

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Off-Road Ranger I

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Please don't say 146.46. Oh please pretty please.

Sigh that's what most 4x4 groups use. Sometimes two individuals like to talk for hours on that one. Main thing with HAM is learn your radio and learn how to manually tune other frequencies so you can easily switch once your group is together.

CB - 16 and 4 seem to be popular in AZ
Sorry, someone enlighten me? What's wrong with this particular frequency? It seemed to work fine, all users seemed to be pretty well-behaved. There were a few that had not yet received their call yet, most of them only monitored, but there was simple, effective comms on the trail and even though we had 4 separate teams at different points on the trail, really it worked out fine.
Whenever anyone asked what frequency to use, the simple answer was 146.460 like it had already been designated. If there were to be a different one, or a separate one for each team, I think comms would have been made more complex, especially when one team had to contact another one.
For cb, we tried but even though we were only 15 vehicles apart, lead to tail-gunner comms were really not good. Ham is the only/best way to go, IMO.
Dan K6DHR
 

1Louder

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Steward I

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Sorry, someone enlighten me? What's wrong with this particular frequency? It seemed to work fine, all users seemed to be pretty well-behaved. There were a few that had not yet received their call yet, most of them only monitored, but there was simple, effective comms on the trail and even though we had 4 separate teams at different points on the trail, really it worked out fine.
Whenever anyone asked what frequency to use, the simple answer was 146.460 like it had already been designated. If there were to be a different one, or a separate one for each team, I think comms would have been made more complex, especially when one team had to contact another one.
For cb, we tried but even though we were only 15 vehicles apart, lead to tail-gunner comms were really not good. Ham is the only/best way to go, IMO.
Dan K6DHR
When you have 5 different groups in close proximity using the same frequency it is very annoying. The greater range that Ham gives you causes issues.
 

ArmyofMike

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Off-Road Ranger I

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Anyone ever heard of or use the MURS channels? They are unlicensed HAM frequencies, but are not used as often as the usual licensed freq's. We have started using them for off-road and "off radar" Search and Rescue usage as needed.

Here they are:
151.820 MHz (11.25 kHz)

151.880 MHz (11.25 kHz)

151.940 MHz (11.25 kHz)

154.570 MHz (20.00 kHz)

154.600 MHz (20.00 kHz)

https://www.fcc.gov/general/multi-use-radio-service-murs
 
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VCeXpedition

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When you have 5 different groups in close proximity using the same frequency it is very annoying. The greater range that Ham gives you causes issues.
I guess my question was particularly about the comment for choosing 146.460 and why it might be a bad choice.
What you say is absolutely true, but is also true for any frequency if 5 disparate groups are using it.
 

4xFar Adventures

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Another option for a bunch of HAMs (if they're spread out) in groups is to lower the output wattage of the mobile unit. My 8800 has Low, Mid1, Mid2, and Hi. I forget the exact power, but I think it's ~5W on Low (which is what an HT will do), up to the full 50W on High.
 
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VCeXpedition

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@Disco2Guy I have the Yaesu ft-8800 as well, its a nice radio. I had mine on 5W all the time, not sure what others were pushing but it was easy for me to hear folks that were at the top when I was only about half-way.
It also has the dual band function and I have used it a couple times and think it would be useful in a scenario like this but even more coordination is required and that seemed unlikely to happen.
Maybe future events like this, it would be fun to get some experienced hams together to do some exercise or fun coordination like that. Then pass that along to those less experienced that might have interest. I think I've talked my son into getting his license.
 

4xFar Adventures

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One of my favorite features, which I've only used once, is the cross band repeater. On my HT, I can talk to the mobile in the truck on one frequency. Then, the truck will transmit on a different frequency at higher wattage. It's a really cool feature, just don't have 2 (or more) trucks set to use that. You get massive feedback loops if you do:)
 

1Louder

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Steward I

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I guess my question was particularly about the comment for choosing 146.460 and why it might be a bad choice.
What you say is absolutely true, but is also true for any frequency if 5 disparate groups are using it.
Here's the deal. Lots of people have Ham radios now and they don't know how to use them. Plenty others spend $30 on a Baofeng and talk illegally on Ham all the time. Typically they do it on 146.46 because someone set the radio up to that VERY popular frequency and said here's your radio. That was my point. You won't find 5 groups of people on a frequency other than 146.46 on offroad trails anywhere. That's why I was a smart ass in my first post joking don't say 146.46. A group I lead, along with others, uses a different simplex frequency. We rarely run into issues. When we do we have yet another one we can go to. My frustration is with all of the illegal ham users that jam up 146.46 and don't understand how Ham is supposed to work. Studying and passing the test is not hard. Learning your radio is not that hard. That's all I am saying.
 

1Louder

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Steward I

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This page shows common simplex frequencies. It's always good to have a few programmed into your radio so you can switch.
http://www.hamuniverse.com/simplexoperating.html

And another good list in cleaner format.
http://www.algissalys.com/amateur-radio/ham-radio-simplex-frequencies-for-2-meter-70cm-and-more

In Arizona this is the suggested simplex band plan:
http://www.azrepeaters.net/index.php?n=RepeaterMaps.Simplex

This thread from 4X4Ham has some interesting tidbits.
http://www.4x4ham.com/showthread.php?3830-Offroad-VHF-2m-simplex-frequency-list

It all circles back to knowing your radio and having options ready. When I lead groups I never use 146.46. That's just me. I do monitor it though when I can since someone may need assistance or it can give you an idea of who is nearby.
 
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VCeXpedition

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@1Louder, yep I totally get what you're saying, but when someone offers up "how 'bout 146.46", and no one counters, and there's 65 rigs, you go.
It's the first run I've used that frequency to be honest, I didn't know there was a stigma attached.
Thanks for those references, very useful.
 

1Louder

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Steward I

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Anyone ever heard of or use the MURS channels? They are unlicensed HAM frequencies, but are not used as often as the usual licensed freq's. We have started using them for off-road and "off radar" Search and Rescue usage as needed.

Here they are:
151.820 MHz (11.25 kHz)

151.880 MHz (11.25 kHz)

151.940 MHz (11.25 kHz)

154.570 MHz (20.00 kHz)

154.600 MHz (20.00 kHz)

https://www.fcc.gov/general/multi-use-radio-service-murs
What radios are you using with these frequencies? I don't think the 2M radios support them. Maybe I'm wrong.
 
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VCeXpedition

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Off-Road Ranger I

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Torrance, L.A., Cal., Earth
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K6DHR
What radios are you using with these frequencies? I don't think the 2M radios support them. Maybe I'm wrong.
@1Louder, I think you're right, my ft-8800 can be modified to use these frequencies, which means it's not intended to do that.
These require specific radios for those frequencies. I am aware of those and have those programmed in but not commonly used.
It's not a bad choice if everyone has the right radios, but between cb and ham, it's hard to get a moderate sized group to decide on one or the other, let alone introducing a third more obscure choice.
That said, the best thing you can do to have good comma in a trail run with more than a few cars is to have the best antenna you can get. I've never seen a MURS radio that wasn't a handheld, but I may be wrong.
 

WJ - Firefly

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Couple of quick points...

1. There are no unlicensed Ham frequencies.
2. The MURS channels were previously used in the "Color Dot" portion of part 90, in the Industrial and Business VHF band.
3. Usage is unlicensed, but legal output power, by rule (like the license) is limited to 2 watts.
4. Interestingly telemetry modulation techniques are allowed. (Interesting to me anyway, as I do a lot of digital on the Ham bands.)

I was unaware these frequencies had been reallocated from the business band. Good to know, but harder to coordinate without knowing how users are going to be equipped.

Thanks, all for the info.
 

Kelly

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Influencer II

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Anyone ever heard of or use the MURS channels? They are unlicensed HAM frequencies, but are not used as often as the usual licensed freq's. We have started using them for off-road and "off radar" Search and Rescue usage as needed.

Here they are:
151.820 MHz (11.25 kHz)

151.880 MHz (11.25 kHz)

151.940 MHz (11.25 kHz)

154.570 MHz (20.00 kHz)

154.600 MHz (20.00 kHz)

https://www.fcc.gov/general/multi-use-radio-service-murs
There are some interesting products on the MURS freqs. Like the Dakota Alert System. Motion sensing radios that give you an alert if they detect movement. Great for rural driveways.
 

Chris Arnesen

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I'll add that while 146.460 works well in a lot of locations, it behooves amateurs to check their state repeater band-plans. While here in Oregon it is a valid simplex frequency, as some 4x4 groups learned in Washington state, it is allocated there as a repeater output. :openmouth: