Most durable travel trailer | OVERLAND BOUND COMMUNITY

Most durable travel trailer

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MMett

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My family of 3 is looking at getting a travel trailer. (Not ready for tent life yet). What’s the most durable trailer that’s under 4000#. Indoor shower and kitchen not required.
 

DRAX

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I would start looking at teardrop-type trailers and avoid any mass-produced trailers as they simply aren't durable. There are also larger off-road trailers from companies like Black Series. Just be prepared to pay a pretty penny for a durable off-road trailer, they come at a price because they're not built like cheap crap.
 

MidOH

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Outdoors RV has tough-ish travel trailers. Nobody is going to wheel one anyways.

Not sure if they make little ones. They're all designed for 1 ton trucks and over your weight limit, last time I checked.
 
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DRAX

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She’s almost 3. Budget would be under $30
Check out one of the Bean trailers. Meaner Bean - Off-Road Trailers | Teardrop Trailers Made in Utah | Bean Trailer

You may have to end up mounting an RTT on top to fit everyone comfortably, but I think you're going to have a hard time finding something that checks all the boxes and comes in within your budget. The NoBo trailers from Forest River will fall within your budget but they're not durable because they're largely built using the standard mass-produced travel trailer process with some "off-road" mods/designs.
 
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smritte

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The NoBo trailers from Forest River will fall within your budget but they're not durable because they're largely built using the standard mass-produced travel trailer process with some "off-road" mods/designs.
What DRAX said actually applies to most of the "Off-Road" trailers. Within the last decade, especially the last five years, most of the travel trailer companies wanted a piece of the upcoming off-road trailer market. The trailers they built were slapped together street trailers with a small lift and dirt tires. Fortunately there are a few who actually make a good product that won't disintegrate on dirt roads. Be especially careful of the off-road tent trailers. I've seen a number of those at my off-road events with cracked frames and parts literally falling off.
See if you can rent something locally.
 

cug

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I’d look at some of the brands that are used internationally, like in Australia and South Africa. At least to get ideas on how a solid trailer should look like, since these guys have been beating on them on corrugated long distance roads forever.
 

bgenlvtex

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I’d look at some of the brands that are used internationally, like in Australia and South Africa. At least to get ideas on how a solid trailer should look like, since these guys have been beating on them on corrugated long distance roads forever.
The Australians are on the bleeding edge where off road campers are concerned. Frames and suspensions in particular are leaps and bounds better than anything made in USA.

In the sub $30k category I would look hard at an Opus 2
 

M Rose

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Outdoors RV has tough-ish travel trailers. Nobody is going to wheel one anyways.

Not sure if they make little ones. They're all designed for 1 ton trucks and over your weight limit, last time I checked.
Actually not all of the ORV lineup is for 1ton or above. The Blackstone line is made for 1/2 ton rates rigs, they even have a 16’ model that a large SUV can pull. I worked at the factory for 3 years, so I’m pretty intimate with their products. Also if I were in the market for a TT, ORV and Arctic Fox (both owned by Northwood Manufacturing formerly Nash Trailers) would be the only manufacturers I would be looking at.
 

MMett

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Savannah, GA, USA
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Actually not all of the ORV lineup is for 1ton or above. The Blackstone line is made for 1/2 ton rates rigs, they even have a 16’ model that a large SUV can pull. I worked at the factory for 3 years, so I’m pretty intimate with their products. Also if I were in the market for a TT, ORV and Arctic Fox (both owned by Northwood Manufacturing formerly Nash Trailers) would be the only manufacturers I would be looking at.
The trailers you mentioned are far too big for anything I’m looking at. I’m looking for something a 4Runner can pull.
 

M Rose

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The trailers you mentioned are far too big for anything I’m looking at. I’m looking for something a 4Runner can pull.
Our 04 4Runner pulls the 21KVS just fine… the 21KVS dry is 6,000 lbs, so we have roughly 1200# to spare do water n food
 

MidOH

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For me, 21' is 3/4 to one ton truck territory.

I'll never exceed half my tow rating, and overland anywhere, ever again.

Towing is so much nicer this way.
 
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cug

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I'll never exceed half my tow rating, and overland anywhere, ever again.
It's not just that, even on just "not so nice" roads, getting close to the tow rating isn't that great. Can't even imagine towing a trailer that is larger than the typical off-road teardrop or so along "overland trails", even easy ones. I have towed in Europe, but that was with small(ish) cars and on paved roads, for the trips we plan we now have a Patriot Camper X1 on order to be towed by a relatively new 4Runner. That camper trailer is out of many folks financial reach for what it is, but it's the maximum size I personally consider towing off-road, no matter the towing vehicle, since the whole vehicle+trailer size gets way out of hand quickly.
 

MidOH

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OP will have to more specific on terrain and useage.

A "travel trailer" is not an "overlanding trailer" or "offroading trailer".

But many off us boondock with Rv's and travel trailers. Usually set them as a basecamp somewhere. A plain old travel trailer with the right ground clearance and good tires has done me fine.
 
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M Rose

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How is this? The towing capacity of a 4Runner is 5000#?
Not wither factory tow package and V-8 it’s 7,000, pulls the grades without issue. I do use sway bars though.
 

Billiebob

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Look at a Hiker, they have a third child bunk option.


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dchurch

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We looked for about two years, visited numerous manufacturers and custom builders. It came down to two teardrop style off-road trailers. The Pando by Off Grid (Canada) and the Meaner by Bean out of Salt Lake Utah. After touring Bean in Utah the Meaner won us over by a clear margin.

It features a seamless fiberglass shell over *5 foot tall composite glass strand wall panels. The subfloor is made of the same high-tech insulated material. The interior space is a full queen bed that converts to a couch with a pop-up table.

Bean offers a simple roll up pole/fabric bunk for a child or small adult. The design, materials and craftsmanship of the Bean trailers are awesome. Bean has a nice range of galley options and additions to their trailers.

We are currently boondocking on the Salmon River (idaho). Last night we followed a trail to a cliff side dead end. The Meaner pulled off a rock crawling 3 point turn around that saved my bacon. I am sold on the Max coupler. No way a common hitch could have done it.

Our Meaner has held up great through thousands of miles of back roads and off-road USFS/BLM country. I made a video of upgrades to our Meaner that is a pretty good tour of the trailer. 6 o'clock, time to get up and make the coffee.

 
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