Jackery 1000 Power Generator Overview

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Contributor I

60
Charleston, SC, USA
First Name
Bryce
Last Name
Campbell
Hey guys, I've been using a Jackery solar panel for a while, gifted from a friend, and recently got another panel and a Jackery 1000 donated to me and thought I'd give a quick overview before I do a longterm review.

The main use-case for a setup like this is either for weekend camping or fulltime use. There are smaller and bigger units, but the 1000 is the sweet spot for "extending camping", light fulltime rigs, or if there's more than 1 person. A friend of mine runs a Dometic CFX35 on a Jackery 1000 for 3-4 days no problem, and I'm planning to replace my cooler with a similar fridge.

To the point, I'll start with the panels.
They're 100w panels and it takes around 8 hours depending on the sun, to fully charge the unit. But in my experience that's unnecessary. You can also charge it through a wall outlet or cigarette lighter to keep it juiced up. So charge it before you leave home, and if it's a short trip that might be all you need. But for longer trips, charge it when you drive, and if you stay put for a a few days, use the solar panels. Worth noting it could last you anywhere from a few days to a few weeks depending on you.

The panels are solid, the fabric or canvas material that surrounds them is, so far, relatively durable. This makes it easy to adjust the angle depending on the sun, they also have stands on the back. As for said fabric durability, I won't know until I know.. I'll address it in the main review as time goes on. But I got one panel in SLC halfway through my trip used from a friend, I used it to charge my phone often, and it doesn't have any wear. And I did not exactly baby it.
attachFull613690


As for the unit itself, there's not much to it. The panels connect through an included cord, it has multiple household outlets as well as USB and a cigarette style. It has a screen that displays battery level and other info. Again, simplicity is the main benefit. You don't have to think at all with these setups. A thought I had before was "how long does it last?" but that's not really a problem because of the different ways to charge it. How long are you going to go without a wall/cig outlet or the sun? Probably not more than the 3-4 days it takes to drain with a decent sized Dometic.

So that's great, but there are 2 main downsides.
1. a comparable DIY solar setup to mine would be a few hundred cheaper. The Jackery 1000 w/ 2 100w panels is $1500. For me, the convenience is probably worth the difference and peace of mind my truck won't catch fire. On that note, it's pretty much like a dual battery setup - except the battery is larger and mobile and can be charged not just by the alternator.

2. Battery durability. This is two separate issues.
2a. If something goes wrong, you can't splice a new part into the power unit itself (obviously solar panels can be easily replaced). But I haven't heard of anything going wrong with one of these, and I have heard good things about Jackery support in general. If something does happen I'll share my experience.
2b. Longterm degradation. Goalzeros/Jackerys/similar units are good for either 500 or 1000 full cycles before degradation (to 80% capacity). On a DIY setup, the standalone battleborn battery would be good for somewhere around 2000 cycles. Now, realistically, does this matter? Probably not, even if you travel for extended periods like myself. But it is worth noting.

I'm a heavy user, I do trips for months at a time, so I should be able to get a really good idea of this setup. But that will take time! If you have any questions let me know.

brycercampbell.com
 

MOAK

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Member II

2,835
Wernersville, PA, USA
First Name
Donald
Last Name
Diehl
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0745

Nice write up & looking forward to your long term appraisal. I’m very skeptical of these portable units, I see them as just more stuff to pack in & out. Free huh? Fell into your lap? Your secret is safe here!
 

MOAK

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Have this iceco fridge running for days now. Set at 37F. The 1000 uses 14 percent at night . Next day it's back up to 100 by noon.
Ok I give up, I deploy 120 watts of solar panels. Our fridge set at 38f uses less than 3% of available voltage using a pair of AGMs @125 ah, with ambient temps in the 80s / 60s. In perfect sunlight conditions the AGMs are back up to 12.9 volts in a couple of hours. So, what are the numbers for your set up? Just curios, my son in law is seeking my advice on portable power options. As with everything, the manufactures stellar numbers are what the product might be capable of delivering, in perfect conditions. Thanks
 
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Jdsint

Rank II

Contributor III

Have this iceco fridge running for days now. Set at 37F. The 1000 uses 14 percent at night . Next day it's back up to 100 by noon.
Ok I give up, I deploy 120 watts of solar panels. Our fridge set at 38f uses less than 3% of available voltage using a pair of AGMs @125 ah, with ambient temps in the 80s / 60s. In perfect sunlight conditions the AGMs are back up to 12.9 volts in a couple of hours. So, what are the numbers for your set up? Just curios, my son in law is seeking my advice on portable power options. As with everything, the manufactures stellar numbers are what the product might be capable of delivering, in perfect conditions.
Thanks
In not a tech guy. Hope this helps you. These are for the unit and one solar panel.
 

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M Rose

US Northwest Region Director
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Explorer I

5,171
La Grande, Oregon, USA
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Michael
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Ok I give up, I deploy 120 watts of solar panels. Our fridge set at 38f uses less than 3% of available voltage using a pair of AGMs @125 ah, with ambient temps in the 80s / 60s. In perfect sunlight conditions the AGMs are back up to 12.9 volts in a couple of hours. So, what are the numbers for your set up? Just curios, my son in law is seeking my advice on portable power options. As with everything, the manufactures stellar numbers are what the product might be capable of delivering, in perfect conditions. Thanks
Have your SIL watch some DIY Solar With Will Prowse on YouTube. Will does an excellent job reviewing name brand “Portable Solar Generators”. His last one on the Jackery didn’t rate very well.
 

MiamiC70

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Influencer I

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Miami, FL, USA
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MiamiC70
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MiamiC70
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Iceco VL45 fridge draws at a rate of 45 watts (3.7 amps @ 12V DC) while actively running. Since fridges tend to only run about 1/3 of the time; we can estimate an average rate of 15 watts over time. Let's assume a 90% efficiency for the 12V DC regulated output on the Jackery. See below for hypothetical run-time comparison.

Jackery Explorer 300 ----- (293 Wh * .90) / 15 watt device = 17.6 hours of effective run-time.

Jackery Explorer 500 ----- (518 Wh * .90) / 15 watt device = 31.1 hours (1.3 days) of effective run-time.

Jackery Explorer 1000 --- (1,002 Wh * .90) / 15 watt device = 60.1 hours (2.5 days) of effective run-time.

Jackery Explorer 1500 --- (1,488 Wh * .90) / 15 watt device = 89.3 hours (3.7 days) of effective run-time.
 
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