Inyo National Forest May 2022

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samba

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I have started thinking about planning a trip to Inyo National Forest - Ancient BristleCone pine forest area.
If anybody has experience driving up the Silver Canyon Road and finding camp spots, that would be really helpful.
 

Narbob

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I have started thinking about planning a trip to Inyo National Forest - Ancient BristleCone pine forest area.
If anybody has experience driving up the Silver Canyon Road and finding camp spots, that would be really helpful.
I’ve camped approximately half way up the mountain to BristolCone Pine Forest at Grandview campground. Although not primitive camping, it’s open, mostly empty when I’ve been there and has pit toilets.
 
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samba

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I’ve camped approximately half way up the mountain to BristolCone Pine Forest at Grandview campground. Although not primitive camping, it’s open, mostly empty when I’ve been there and has pit toilets.
Thank you for the tip. I will check that out.
You have got a excellent rig btw. I hope to run into you soon in one of the rally point meets.
 

pluton

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I suggest going up Wyman Canyon (east side) and going down Silver Canyon. Silver is steep...more fun (IMO) to descend. Grandview (≈8600')is the official campground. Dispersed camping is available anywhere that isn't part of the official Bristlecone grove boundaries. I've seen ground tents pitched next to cars at 10 K or 11K feet el. Cold at night, even in summer. You can spend several days exploring the area by vehicle and on foot.
 
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samba

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I suggest going up Wyman Canyon (east side) and going down Silver Canyon. Silver is steep...more fun (IMO) to descend. Grandview (≈8600')is the official campground. Dispersed camping is available anywhere that isn't part of the official Bristlecone grove boundaries. I've seen ground tents pitched next to cars at 10 K or 11K feet el. Cold at night, even in summer. You can spend several days exploring the area by vehicle and on foot.
Awesome.. Thank you very much for the suggestion. I will make that trip up there when the snow clears and the roads open.
 

ZombieCat

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Y’all know I love a Bristlecone Pine Forest, so have a wonderful visit and say hello to my tree friends! The cutoff road to the Patriarch Grove was kinda bumpy last fall and going up to Barcroft Gate was fun. I was pressed for time in the fall and therefore didn’t check out Wyman or other side tracks.
Further south, visit the Alabama Hills - it’s a popular (crowded) boondocking area. View Mt. Whitney through the Mobius Arch, check out the cool rock formations. If you’re traveling with a small footprint, the Lone Pine Campground is close to Whitney Portal.
Depending on road conditions and if the pass is open, drive up to Saddlebag Lake for a primo high country camping spot. Hiking in the Twenty Lakes area is superb. There are several FCFS campgrounds along the way - Aspen, Elley Lake & Tioga Lake come to mind - that are ridiculously scenic.
Check out Bodie State Historical Park and Mono Lake, too.
Although I didn’t make it there in 2021, I’ve been told that the Virginia Lakes area is also worth a visit. Other ideas are the Devil’s Postpile, Red Meadows, Convict Lake and Aspendell/Lake Sabrina.
 
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