OB Approved Introduction to Recovery equipment

  • Hi Guest, you may choose a LIGHT or DARK theme that works best for you with the "Style Chooser" button at the bottom left on this page!
  • HTML tutorial
  • Hello all! We have just made an update to our live server environments in preperation for our offline expedition mode and vast product improvements. If you experience any difficulties, please post in the support forumss! Thank you - See you on the trail!

Dunco

Rank VI
Member

Off-Road Ranger I

3,346
Warwick Queensland Autralia
First Name
Kris
Last Name
Duncan
Member #

0787

Ham Callsign
VK4FABX
The following list has been compiled to provide a brief description of some equipment used for 4wd recoverys

1.1 Winches
(a) PTO Winch. (Power Take Off) - powered by the vehicle’s engine through its gear box with the PTO manually engaged and the transfer case in neutral. Winch drum speed can be varied by the appropriate
gear selection and engine acceleration. The vehicle’s engine must be able to run.

(b) Electric Winch- normally powered from the vehicle’s DC battery supply. Its motor is controlled by forward and reverse solenoids that are operated by a remote hand piece. These winches have a single
winch drum speed whether in forward or reverse.
warn_winch_vr12000.jpg

(c) Portable Hand Winch (Tirfor style) - a versatile and portable, hand operated winch that works on a ‘rope feed through a walking lock’principle. Their load rating varies from about 800kg up to 3200kg depending on the model and manufacturers specifications.
tirfor-hand-winch.jpg
(d) Hydraulic Winch– usually powered by the vehicle’s power steering hydraulic pump. It will pull a constant load at varying speeds and is operated by manually opening and closing fluid control valves. The vehicle’s engine must be able to run.

1.2 Shear Pin
A small, sacrificial part usually made of bronze or brass and approximately 30- 40 mm long and 4 mm in diameter. They are most commonly incorporated in both PTO and Tirfor winches. These shear pins avoid equipment overloading by shearing if the rated capacity of the winch is exceeded therefore separating the driving motor from the loaded cable drum. Never use nails or similar items as replacements or an alternative as this can result in mechanical failure or rope breakage as a possible likelihood.
images (1).jpg

1.3 Snatch Block (Pulley)
A heavy duty pulley that can be used to either redirect the line of haul or increase the winching capacity by adding a mechanical advantage to any winching exercise. This could be essential in heavy or long recoveries to reduce the load on the winch itself.
ARBSnatchBlock9000Funky.png

1.4 Strop
A length of rope that is finished with a loop at each end as attachment points which can be used to assist in a recovery situation. Usually constructed of steel wire but becoming more common as nylon or Kevlar cored rubber sheathed rope with steel thimbles in each end. These are especially useful for anchoring the winch rope to an abrasive anchor point. Strops can also be used for direct towing or lengthening a winch rope. If no web sling is available,a strop can be used as a tree trunk protector by looping the strop around a tree and placing sticks vertical (or other padding) between the strop and the outside of the tree.These are available in a variety of lengths with the most common of the rated minimum breaking strengths ranging between 8000 and 12000kg.

1.5 Winch Extension Strap
Most commercially available extension straps are manufactured from 55 to 80mm polyester non stretch webbing. Extremely useful when the most suitable anchor point is out of reach of your fully extended winch rope. They are lighter and easier to store than conventional steel wire rope or strops with minimum breaking strength of between 4500kg and 8000kg depending on the width of the strap.
TJM_Winch_Extension_Strap_20m_6000kg.jpg

1.6 Tree Trunk Protector
These are similar to a strop, but made from a wide cloth or nylon webbing with stitched loops at each end with a minimum breaking strength of 12000kg. These should always be used when the winch anchor point is a live tree in order to avert ring barking it with the wire rope. They are also referred to as a ‘tree saver’. This device will reduce the environmental impact from 4WD activities.
4WD-Heavy-Duty-Tree-Trunk-Protector-Strap-by-Just-Straps-315050-l.jpg

1.7 Snatch Strap/ Kinetic energy strap
Specifically designed to stretch under load for maximum performance, a snatch strap is a very effective method of extracting a bogged or immobilised 4WD when a second vehicle is able to assist. The kinetic energy generated by the elasticity of the snatch strap aids with the recovery itself, while at the same
time reducing the likelihood of vehicle damage.These are constructed from wide nylon webbing with reinforced stitched loops at each end with a minimum breaking strength of between 8000kg and 12000kg usually and have the ability to stretch by approximately 20% and are particularly efficient for extricating lightly bogged vehicles from loose surfaces such as sand or powdery snow.
images (2).jpg

1.8 Bow Shackle
The Bow Shackle has a larger inner working radius than a ‘D’ Shackle, offering more space for a strap or rope eye and the added ability to achieve greater angles when recovering in difficult situations. This is a fully enclosed fastening device used in preference to open-faced hooks for increased safety. They are opened and closed by means of a threaded pin. At least two or three of these are an essential part of recovery equipment. When fastening the pin to the shackle turn till it firms up then wind back about a quarter of a turn so that the pin can be undone after use.These shackles must be individually tested and stamped with the working load limit for safety and conform to relevant standards . Common sizes are 4.7 tonne and 3.2 tonne.

1.9 ‘D’ Shackle
This is a fully enclosed ‘D’ shaped fastening device that can be used in the same manner as the bow shackle but with a reduced capacity to fit sling loops within the ‘D’ due to their shape.
 

Dunco

Rank VI
Member

Off-Road Ranger I

3,346
Warwick Queensland Autralia
First Name
Kris
Last Name
Duncan
Member #

0787

Ham Callsign
VK4FABX
1.10 High Lift, Kangaroo or Wallaby Jack
The primary function of a high life jack is to elevate the vehicle clear of objects halting progress or likely to cause any damage, where a standard vehicles jack is not sufficient. Its secondary function is a short travel hand winch, when limited recovery means are available. The jack has the ability to lift the 4WD about 1 metre above the ground so that road building materials can be placed under the wheels for better traction
These jacks introduce a number of hazards and associated risks especially if they are not maintained and/or operated correctly. Extreme care must be taken when jacking the vehicle, as the higher it is jacked the more unstable it becomes. This elevated lift allows the vehicle to be easily pushed sideways resulting in vehicle and/or equipment damage, or harm to the operator. Jacks can kick side ways rapidly as the vehicle falls sideways
images (3).jpg

1.11 Jack Base Plate
These are usually constructed from a flat piece of steel or thick timber. The plate allows the weight of the vehicle to be dispersed over a larger ground area or footprint, preventing any selected type of jack from sinking into soft surfaces once loaded. These are highly recommended when travelling across soft surfaces, such as sand.
download.jpg
1.13 Bull Bag/Exhaust Jack
Also known as ‘Air Jack Bag’. These are typically a large rubber or vinyl bag which can be placed under the vehicle and inflated by means of attaching a hose to the vehicle’s exhaust. They are a quick and efficient means of raising the vehicle, particularly in muddy or sandy environments where other jacks are likely to push down into soft surfaces
download (1).jpg

1.14 Recovery Tracks
These are designed to be inserted under the vehicles wheels to enable them to gain traction when recovering, or to prevent the vehicle sinking, in soft/loose sand or mud bogs. Usually provided in pairs with grip lugs on one surface which allows the vehicles tyres to grip and gain traction.
download (2).jpg
 

maktruk

Rank V
Member

Pathfinder I

2,741
95046
Member #

0912

I keep meaning to find a good airbag lift. They are awesome in soft sand.

Also, you can.lift just about any part of the vehicle without finagling a jack into some obscure spot.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Dunco

ShawnR

Rank VI
Member

Influencer II

3,316
Davenport, Iowa
Member #

0782

Thanks for posting this. I should have posted my winch/bumper combo thread here, instead of the general discussion form a couple weeks ago.
 

nuclearlemon

Rank 0

Contributor I

60
i'm guessing strop is a non us term? wondering what country that's from?

i've only ever heard the term used for the leather strap for sharpening old school razors
 
  • Like
Reactions: IronPercheron

ohiowrangler

Rank V
Member
Supporter

Member II

2,268
Newark, Oh
First Name
Ron
Last Name
Darling
Member #

3644

This is a very good article, I recommend readers follow up with following articles on basics and safety. Ron
 
Last edited:

LostInSocal

Rank V
Member

Advocate III

1,836
Chino Hills, CA, US
Member #

5448

I don't do (at least at the moment) any hardcore trails so my rig isn't outfitted expecting to have trouble clearing most terrains. However, I've been in a situation where I got stuck in a snow bank, and luckily someone stopped to try and help, but neither of us had any proper straps or anything. He offered up his ratchet strap but that immediately broke when we used it. My question is what is the minimum I should carry? I'm guessing some kinetic straps, set of recovery boards, and shovel? Not sure I want to attempt a hi-lift jack without some proper tutoring. What else might I want if I can't recover myself but another vehicle might be able to help if I had the proper equipment on hand?
 

ohiowrangler

Rank V
Member
Supporter

Member II

2,268
Newark, Oh
First Name
Ron
Last Name
Darling
Member #

3644

With the absence of a winch(even with), I'd recommend a recovery strap, shackles, tree saver. The high lift jack can be a dangerous tool, but a useful tool, replacing a winch when needed , manual labor will be involved. Many clubs and members have videos on safe operation of a hi lift for use of recovery. Good luck, Ron