How prepared are we really? | OVERLAND BOUND COMMUNITY

How prepared are we really?

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North American Sojourner

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This came up on my Youtube feed the other day and I was saddened listening to her story. I wanted to pass this on to everyone that may be alone, old (me) or otherwise slightly underweight to fight off an attack, not by a bear, or coyote, but another man, or woman for that matter.
We take for granted that we're safe in the wilderness, in camp grounds or back country. Please revisit your protection protocol, escape route, start-run-drive routine. Be safe out there, and remember to be prepared.
Zim
 

Billiebob

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Not that I think of human predators but I always park facing the road out. I'm more concerned about rising flood water or a forest fire or..... But yes, everytime I stop to camp.... I park so I can just drive out with zero confusion. And I have a key/ignition protocol too.
 

grubworm

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what's equally scary is how the laws in the US are getting twisted to protect the bad people and go after folk who are defending themselves. as citizens, we not only have to know how to defend ourselves from criminals, but also how to defend ourselves from the court system
 

rgallant

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I do not generally think about it but when I drive solo I carry a large belt knife, and always have my 12 gauge (as I am in Canada just for wildlife and survival uses). But as I treat groups of humans like grizzly's and generally just move on. Trying to stop me just means my Disco hits them or moves on.

It is a problem that affects women more than men, and drunks /high idiots are always a problem. A a number of issues this year, due to over crowding at popular sites and the go out and get falling down drunk aggressive types.

Just got keep moving further into the back country.
 

MOAK

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I’ve never had any problems, even while working job sites in south central, way back when. However, I’d never be mistaken for a good looking woman. Besides that we very rarely camp where ordinary 4x4 vehicles can easily access when we are alone. I also have a really good 7th sense and have never put myself or my wife in any sort of dangerous situation. I cannot help but wonder, if the maniac had been watching her since 10:00, hey, I’d have introduced myself to him. I don’t carry, but he wouldn’t have known that. Then, once again, I’m not a woman, so the odds of harm to me are greatly reduced.
 

MOAK

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what's equally scary is how the laws in the US are getting twisted to protect the bad people and go after folk who are defending themselves. as citizens, we not only have to know how to defend ourselves from criminals, but also how to defend ourselves from the court system
The recent court case that garnered National attention does not reflect your opinion. If anything the laws have been rewritten over the past 30 years or so that make it easier to “stand your ground” so to speak.
 

DaPyrate

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I think statistically people will always be the bigger threat to personal safety. I think situational awareness along with having a basic plan of escape will go a long way. Some things I try to do is park my vehicle in a spot that is not easily blocked in, and I always place my keys in the same spot so if I do have to rapidly ditch camp I'm not looking for them. I also think having means to defend yourself is important but what that is varies greatly from person to person as well as place to place.
 

bgenlvtex

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How many extra bodies did they find scattered about when they were looking for Brian Laundrie? 5 or 6?

Over most of the planet humans are the apex predator and are unilaterally the greatest threat to other humans.

There are waaaaaay more transient people today than ever in my lifetime. Some by choice for entertainment, some by circumstance not of their choice, some because a mobile predator is a successful predator. Even a brief glance through history will adequately illustrate the sheer numbers of evil people who walk this planet.
 

MOAK

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How many extra bodies did they find scattered about when they were looking for Brian Laundrie? 5 or 6?

Over most of the planet humans are the apex predator and are unilaterally the greatest threat to other humans.

There are waaaaaay more transient people today than ever in my lifetime. Some by choice for entertainment, some by circumstance not of their choice, some because a mobile predator is a successful predator. Even a brief glance through history will adequately illustrate the sheer numbers of evil people who walk this planet.
The Great Depression had more homeless than we have now.. over 3 million homeless back then, ( total population 127million) now it hovers around 500,000 . However even the Great Depression pales in comparison to the depression of 1870 when fully 1/5th of the populace was homeless. The number of homeless in my lifetime hasn’t changed all that much always hovering just above or below a half million people. The biggest difference I’ve seen in my lifetime is that the homeless have recently come out of the shadows.
 

MidOH

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1870 America is looking nicer and nicer every day.

Our homeless numbers don't include orchard camps, indentured servants, and almost slave labor, crammed into small houses.

Not to mention human trafficing.....and the modern era stops looking so rosey.
 

Advtres

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Being a female overlander who often goes out solo I agree with many of the comments about being situationally aware and having enough personal protection and self defense skills to buy you time, deter, or signal for help. Basics I have with me is a grouchy cattle dog who will snarl and bark at strangers, large camp knife which I keep on me pretty much all the time.

Since most off the overlanding I do is WAY off the beaten path I usually feel pretty secure - though I am still paranoid about bears!
 

North American Sojourner

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Being a female overlander who often goes out solo I agree with many of the comments about being situationally aware and having enough personal protection and self defense skills to buy you time, deter, or signal for help. Basics I have with me is a grouchy cattle dog who will snarl and bark at strangers, large camp knife which I keep on me pretty much all the time.

Since most off the overlanding I do is WAY off the beaten path I usually feel pretty secure - though I am still paranoid about bears!
Well said. I want a blue Healer but I think he would wear my ass out..LOL. Thank you for your thoughts.
Zim
 
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ZombieCat

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Being a female overlander who often goes out solo I agree with many of the comments about being situationally aware and having enough personal protection and self defense skills to buy you time, deter, or signal for help. Basics I have with me is a grouchy cattle dog who will snarl and bark at strangers, large camp knife which I keep on me pretty much all the time.

Since most off the overlanding I do is WAY off the beaten path I usually feel pretty secure - though I am still paranoid about bears!
Absolutely! As another female overlander (over 20K miles this year!), here are a few suggestions:
1) Tell someone your travel plans and check in regularly to advise of changes and current status.
2) Purchase a PLB (personal locator beacon). I have the basic “oh, sh*t!” version which transmits a distress signal.
3) Park and commercial campgrounds are fairly safe; remote areas are fairly safe in terms of human threats (animal/natural disasters may still apply); more populated off-grid sites are the worst. I’ve seen some sketchy folks at these locations. Personal safety and theft are my concerns.
4) As you stated, have some type of weapon(s) with which you’re comfortable and fairly proficient.
5) Trust your instincts! If it feels wrong, move along.
6) Dogs are great, but can create problems in bear country. Just be aware how a canine can change the dynamic in a bear encounter and adjust accordingly.
7) Use technology to your advantage. The Fires app was a great help to me this year, as it aggregates information from both Inciweb and CalFire. Being aware of fires, flood warnings, winter storms, etc. can help you better plan your route.
8) If you’re taking a backcountry trail, know who in the area can do an off-road recovery. Program that info into your phone - i.e., Matt’s Offroad Recovery in Hurricane, UT!

Again, just my take on being a solo traveler.
Happy Trails to Everyone in 2022!
 

Overlanding Lawyer

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All great comments, the best is a dog! Warm, friendly, never alone, and will deter so many folks. If my dog doesn’t like you, I doubt I will either. The key fob alarm with a louder horn, cheap and may cause folks or animal to flee…
 

Advtres

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Hollister, CA, USA
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Delirium
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Skid
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Being a female overlander who often goes out solo I agree with many of the comments about being situationally aware and having enough personal protection and self defense skills to buy you time, deter, or signal for help. Basics I have with me is a grouchy cattle dog who will snarl and bark at strangers, large camp knife which I keep on me pretty much all the time.

Since most off the overlanding I do is WAY off the beaten path I usually feel pretty secure - though I am still paranoid about bears!
Well said. I want a blue Healer but I think he would wear my ass out..LOL. Thank you for your thoughts.
Zim
The one I have is a blue and he is all Doberman.