Gear for starting out? (Check my list!) | OVERLAND BOUND COMMUNITY

Gear for starting out? (Check my list!)

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cug

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Contributor III

116
San Jose, CA, USA
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Guido
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GNE
Just make sure, the stuff is decent quality. Smittybilt can be good enough or can be … less so. Similar to Coleman. Unfortunately, often enough you get what you pay for …
 

Billiebob

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earth
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Bill
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William
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Here’s what I’m thinking:
- First Aid / Trauma kit
- fire extinguisher
- Hi-Lift
- ViAir portable compressor
- Rapid tire deflator
- Traction boards
- 2.5-5 gallon jerry can
- water cans
- traction boards
let me rewrite this...
Band Aids
Fire Extinguisher
Factory Jack
why ????
double why lol ?????
or tire chains, kinda terrain dependent
or, focus on mods that increase gas mileage, ps, none of them are on overlanding forums
water bottles, ya only need drinking water
really, ya already said that

you missed the flight plan, letting a trusted freind know where you are and when you will be back.
 

CafeRoaster

Rank 0

Contributor I

60
Seattle, WA, USA
First Name
David
Last Name
Clark
Thanks everyone. I've ordered some stuff, and am picking up the rest in person. I think I'll have everything I need by the end of next week.

I ordered a cheaper roof rack that some folks mention rusts after a couple rainy days. So I'm thinking I should just go ahead and spray some protectant on it before putting it on. I was thinking about doing brush-on Rustoleum enamel. Thoughts? Recommendations?
 
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mep1811

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Pathfinder I

1,212
El Paso, Texas
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Michael
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Perez
Thanks everyone. I've ordered some stuff, and am picking up the rest in person. I think I'll have everything I need by the end of next week.

I ordered a cheaper roof rack that some folks mention rusts after a couple rainy days. So I'm thinking I should just go ahead and spray some protectant on it before putting it on. I was thinking about doing brush-on Rustoleum enamel. Thoughts? Recommendations?
Can't hurt to repaint the rack with another layer of paint.
 
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Wanderlost

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Member III

3,316
Caledonia, Illinois
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You're just starting out?
My advice is to just throw your camping gear in the back and head out.
All you need off your list to get started is a simple first-aid kit and the fire extinguisher mounted as close to arm's reach from the driver's seat. The only addition would be a current Motor Vehicle Usage Map for the National Forest(s) you're going to be in.
Don't get caught up in the gear frenzy, at least not right away. Experience will give you the best advice on what you need. That goes for what modifications, if any, you should make to your vehicle.
 

CafeRoaster

Rank 0

Contributor I

60
Seattle, WA, USA
First Name
David
Last Name
Clark
You're just starting out?
My advice is to just throw your camping gear in the back and head out.
All you need off your list to get started is a simple first-aid kit and the fire extinguisher mounted as close to arm's reach from the driver's seat. The only addition would be a current Motor Vehicle Usage Map for the National Forest(s) you're going to be in.
Don't get caught up in the gear frenzy, at least not right away. Experience will give you the best advice on what you need. That goes for what modifications, if any, you should make to your vehicle.
I did pick up some stuff that I thought would help - shovel, roof rack, storage totes, etc. as well as some essentials I didn't have. I think I've got everything I'll need for quite some time. Plus, I need to continue funding my retirement accounts haha!
 

huachuca

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One thing I seldom see mentioned in threads like this is a booster pack, jumper cable set or some other way of recovering from a dead battery. Other than the first aid kit, my NOCO GB150 gets used more than anything else carried in the truck. Admittedly, its most frequent need is for tractors, combines or vehicles on the farm but I've also been called upon to jump start more folks when camping than to spool out the winch or plug a tire. Disclaimer - The model linked is definite overkill for most but necessary for the big diesels on our ag equipment. My personal experience has been the combo booster pack / air compressor / light / USB charger models sold in the big box stores for $50-$100 that use a lead acid battery are not worth the money - Spend a bit more and get a brand name unit with a lithium battery even though it may have fewer features.
 

bryceCtravels

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Enthusiast I

193
Charleston, SC, USA
First Name
Bryce
Last Name
Campbell
Garmin is necessary with time, not for your first small trips. If you go more often, I would splurge and buy one. It is worth it.

Not debatable is: zip ties, duct tape, sharp knife, phillips AND flathead, tire plug kit (I use the slime one you get at Autozone), air compressor, phone, USB battery bank or some way to charge your phone without starting the car, jumper cables and a jump box, and the obvious like first aid/fire extinguisher. I would argue an air compressor of some kind is necessary as well. I love my ViAIR, no point in plugging a tire if you can't put air in it afterwards.

8FB9AEA3-5352-4EE3-A696-62C01A621AE5.JPG
 

OverlandRS

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Adventure

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I am in a similar situation getting back to car camping and adventuring after being a caregiver for 10+ years to my Mom with ALZ. I started with what I had a Ford Focus RS that was set up for adventure rally. It eventually suffered a mechanical failure and so I traded it for a 2021 Bronco Sport which suffered its own mechanical failure and now waits for weeks for parts. I use my bikepacking gear cause I had it already.

Being a motorsports guy I know people with Elements and I like the factory AWD conversion camper top Elements. They have great use of space, but I am told they don't like lift kits it messes with the handling and steering @DashNcars. I would say use what you got add a skidplate some decent all terrain tires maybe 1 or 2" larger height, some generic camping or back packing gear and your all set. I loaned out most of my expensive and super light weight bikepacking gear wile a caregiver and haven't got it back so I now have some tried and true but inexpensive gear from Bi-Mart, Wallmart, REI, Sportsmans Warehouse. I am a motorsports participant so all my vehicles have always had ABC fire extinguishers on board. My most expensive purchase was the full size Intex air bed from Walmart that did not fit the car and it leaks, replaced with a foam camping mat and a Klymit Static V air mat.

You don't need much:
Some way to heat food, something to eat that food with
a way to store water (case of 20oz waterbottles from Cosco work fine)
good old fashion ice cooler works great
basic camping gear (sleeping bag or wool quilt/blanket, sleeping pad, shelter of some type, or sleep in the Element)
if your cold weather camping a MR. Buddy heater or a electric blanket or convention heater or run the cars heater in the element before bed
a basic set of combo wrenches and sockets and your AAA card and OB1 app
white kitchen plastic garbage bags good for lots of uses including potty bags
you dont need a high lift for an element a good quality factory scissor jack will work or cheap Harbor Freight floor jack (sand skids for these aftermarket)
cheap fuel can with spout or funnel is all you need and can be carried in a roof basket or an old milk crate in the trunk like my grandfather did for years.
a couple walmart tarps and some paracord come in very handy when things dont go to plan
Fire starter kit (presto mini log/matches/tea lights/Bic/fire stick)
a cheap Bi-mart bow saw
basic med booboo kit, plus the normal medications you may have at home (asprin, Ibuprohpan, Tylenol, Alieve, A&D, Neosporin, hayfever/alergy meds) Unless you have EMT training
bug spray/or bug candle
clothes suited for your camping conditions
TP/wetwipes/papertowells
tire repair kit
Walmart cheapo tire pump/or a HF air tank (we used a hand bicycle, sports ball, raft foot pump for decades in our camper van)
a map/gps/phone and a direction to travel

Optional:
HF tow strap
500wh battery bank/inverter
Garmin InReach
Traction boards/matts
bear spray

I am working on a complete list of my economy gear I have now; and planning a video of what I have and how I use it once I get a new rig or get the BroncoSport back.
 
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Shawn686

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Contributor I

60
Canada
As too the fire extingusher, its an easy place to save weight and space. I have been using these (E50):


They are no bigger than a road flare with 4 times more discharge time than a 5lbs and leave no residue

Shawn
 
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M Rose

US Northwest Region Director
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As too the fire extingusher, its an easy place to save weight and space. I have been using these (E50):


They are no bigger than a road flare with 4 times more discharge time than a 5lbs and leave no residue

Shawn
US consumers be ware… these are not NFS approved…
 

rtexpeditions

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I do indeed have a hitch but I don’t really want to spend money on a cargo basket for the hitch.

As for the Hi-Lift, I was concerned about that. I’ll nix it for now until I know more. In the meantime, I’ll take my bottle jack and something to widen its base.
Never underestimate the value of a large block of wood, something like an offcut from a 6"x2" or 6"x4". It adds height, spreads the load and gives a firm flat base for your jack.