FJ 80 Brakes | OVERLAND BOUND COMMUNITY

FJ 80 Brakes

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mr bill

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Have any of you done anything to improve the stopping distance. I've had a couple of very close calls in city traffic and a couple of them had numbers on the back like S550 and 735 but no strikes yet. :fearful:
 

mellowdave

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Personally Im looking at good quality rotors, and ceramic pads next go round, which will be soon. Ive got 100 Series pads on now, but that just improves lifespan, not braking power.
 

mr bill

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Personally Im looking at good quality rotors, and ceramic pads next go round, which will be soon. Ive got 100 Series pads on now, but that just improves lifespan, not braking power.
Thanks Dave,
I'm hopping someone will have magic hydraulic master cylinder (other similar model like series 200 unit) or other calipers.
 
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VCeXpedition

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I changed over to power-stop drilled and slotted rotors front and rear with a good power-stop pad.
The real key to the whole set-up is the pad break-in. It's included in the instructions in the pads and if you follow that, it makes a significant difference in stopping distance.
You'll still only get about 10,000 miles out of the front set though.
Dan
 

mellowdave

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Yeah I was looking at Power Stop with Ceramic Pads. I've heard good things about them. I just did OEM Rotors with Power Stop Ceramic Pads on my Wife's Enclave this weekend (also a very heavy vehicle with large diameter rotors) and the difference in pedal feel was significant. There is also a complete absence of brake noise over the sintered metal OEM pads that were in it before (all four of which were fractured BTW).
 

shoredreamer

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A solid brake fluid flush made a lot of difference for me. My fluid was pitch black and most likely not changed in years. Fade pretty much disappeared and pedal feel is much better. Along with a flush I went full Toyota Genuine on rotors, hoses, lines, remanned calipers and 100 series pads. 100 series pads are thicker which last longer but also have a larger surface area so they do give a bit more bite. I've heard good things about DBA rotors and Hawk Pads also but I'm happy with my setup.
 
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4xFar Adventures

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I have a Rover, but go with @shoredreamer on the setup. All genuine parts give me the best braking. I just did brakes a couple weeks ago and finally went back to genuine pads. I could immediately feel the difference and increase in stopping power. It's something that went missing when last set was installed. There's also very low brake dust accumulation.
 
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mellowdave

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Your best bet will be with the pads. Drilled and slotted rotors are for ventilating and cooling, they are more suited for high performance driving. You might look at the Wilwood MC or a Tacoma swap. Here is the link for a form Expedition Portal talking about the swap. http://www.expeditionportal.com/forum/threads/146423-FJ80-Brake-Master-vs-Tacoma-Brake-Master
I principle I agree here, however in practice, were talking about a truck which is several thousand pounds heavier than the average automobile, so it automatically qualifies as a heavier duty application, the primary cause of brake fade is heat build up. The slots and/or holes are indeed to enhance cooling, as well as ventilate built up gasses around the pad surface. Heat is heat, it doesnt matter if its generated by hi speed driving, or constant application of the brakes due to elevation changes (read as "descending"). The average user in city or suburban driving may never see fade conditions, but haul this big ol girl up and down some mountain passes, loaded with gear and you're pushing well into the "High performance driving" conditions such things were designed for. In the real world, I doubt the rotors make much difference honestly, but I believe Power Stop and some of the other reputable after market makers to be at least the same quality as OEM.
 
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VCeXpedition

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@mellowdave, this is it exactly. Last time I weighed my car with full fuel, I was about 6,400 lbs, and that's without all my kit loaded up. I imagine I'm way over-loaded and can feel every pound descending a mountain grade, and am very conscious of my brakes and think the powerstop upgrade was one of the best things I did to improve confidence in driving in those conditions.
 
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PetfishEric

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Mellowdave - I can't argue your point when you talk about mountain passes at highway speeds. A slotted and drilled rotor could help reduce brake fade in those conditions, and they are the easy upgrade as long as they are quility parts. In town it's more about space management, keep three seconds between you and the car infront of you reguardless of speed. (Safety Manager/Driver trainger coming out in me:grimacing:)
Shoredreamer also brought up a good point about changing the break fluid. Especially on some of our more experianced vehicles. Break fluid is hydroscopic, which means it attacts water, and that will severly impact your braking performace. Brake systems are not sealed, they all have a vent in the master cylinder and the water is absorbed through the air. As the water percentage increases the boiling point on the brake fluid is reduces which causes the bubbles to develope in the system and you loose braking force.
 

shoredreamer

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Mellowdave - I can't argue your point when you talk about mountain passes at highway speeds. A slotted and drilled rotor could help reduce brake fade in those conditions, and they are the easy upgrade as long as they are quility parts. In town it's more about space management, keep three seconds between you and the car infront of you reguardless of speed. (Safety Manager/Driver trainger coming out in me:grimacing:)
Shoredreamer also brought up a good point about changing the break fluid. Especially on some of our more experianced vehicles. Break fluid is hydroscopic, which means it attacts water, and that will severly impact your braking performace. Brake systems are not sealed, they all have a vent in the master cylinder and the water is absorbed through the air. As the water percentage increases the boiling point on the brake fluid is reduces which causes the bubbles to develope in the system and you loose braking force.
Thanks for explaining :)
 

PetfishEric

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Oh I should have pointed out that the rubber brake lines should be one of the first things replaced on an older vehicle as well, because they will swell like a balloon and again cause a loss of braking force. It usually will show itself in pulling during breaking on the front axle but the rear brakes on a solid axle usually have the rubber line from the main line then it splits to each brake so you will just loose rear brakes.
 

mellowdave

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Oh I should have pointed out that the rubber brake lines should be one of the first things replaced on an older vehicle as well, because they will swell like a balloon and again cause a loss of braking force. It usually will show itself in pulling during breaking on the front axle but the rear brakes on a solid axle usually have the rubber line from the main line then it splits to each brake so you will just loose rear brakes.
Agreed, I am going with stainless on mine, but honestly, many times over its been proven that with well maintained rubber lines, the performance is the same. Im just showy like that.