First Aid Kit Location

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Anak

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For an XJ, there is a perfect sized cubby hole in the back. There is a company called Omega Mills that makes a pouch to fit in that cubby. That is my solution.
 

LONO100

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I always keep mine under the rear seat. Whatever you do, keep it in a place that you can access it easily and with one hand.
 
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USStrongman

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MOLLE on the inside of the tailgate.

Speaking of first aid kits... I've watched with some fascination about the types of prices of some kits people buy for their rigs. I've seen like what I have, small, simple, basics to full on kits that are more complete than when I worked as a paramedic in the PNW. Monster bags with so much stuff in them, unless you are using it daily/weekly, someone is gonna die before you find the stuff buried inside you need to help.

My advice, unless you are providing first aid for half a dozen people over a months period of time in the middle of BFE, maybe take a reconsider of the following:

Could the storage space be better utilized?
How often will it be used?
Who will it benefit?
Do I know how to pronounce, let alone use the tools inside?
Cost benefit analysis for your type of adventuring.
Would that money be better used elsewhere like safety or durable extraction use?

Again, my experience working in a major metropolitan area where we saw everything from babies being born, cars off cliffs, heart attacks, burns, stroke, vehicles into waterways, combative patients, overdoses, airplane crash, helicopter crash, mudslide, you name it.
 

Alanymarce

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298
Colombia
Wherever you put it, it needs to be visible immediately, preferably from outside. There's not much point in having a first aid kit if you're unconscious and the good samaritans who could save you don't know where it is (or even that there is one).
 
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USStrongman

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This is kind of what I am getting at.

In all honesty, how many people have ACTUALLY used their kit for something other than a Band-Aid, tweezers or trauma sheers to open a challenging plastic bag for dinner?

Now I am not dismissing be prepared. But at times, being overprepared is of far greater detriment, especially with people who have no to little training, jumping into a $800 "medical kit" to help someone. If it doesn't have an IV, fluids, sutures, IV meds, then what kind of self repairs are people providing to themselves out there?
 

JeepingMike

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Right now my kit is on a carabiner on the rear driver's side seat belt post. (I don't have the back seat in place, Jeep JK.) Obvious if you're looking, but not always in the way of or covered up with other stuff. I ensure whomever is with me, almost always my gf, knows where it is. As my build progresses, it may change...
As for the contents, absolutely agreed on more is not better. I have tried many bags and played with many inventories (spreadsheets are awesome). I've boiled it down to what would I or my partner need to address life threatening illness/injury and basics of what would make being backcountry more survivable for a period of time. The intent is not to treat a whole overland caravan, as in theory each vehicle should also have a kit. If I know I'll be backcountry with a large group for a bit, I may throw a bigger/more extensive kit (like a basecamp goto kit) in for that trip/outing specifically. And has been said, know your stuff; training and experience with the kit contents and emergency care goes a long way to successful care of someone in need.
 

Anak

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I don't think the FAK needs to be a duffel bag worth, but I will say there are some additions needed above what comes in a typical kit.

One of my biggest pet peeves is the "tweezers" that come in FAKs. Those are not tweezers. Those are tweezer shaped objects that belong in the trash. I replace the stock garbage with stainless watch maker's tweezers.

I also find that FAKs don't lend themselves quite so well to an active lifestyle. To put it clearly: The bandaids they come with are not up to the task if you actually intend to keep moving. So I augment with better quality bandaids (extra long ones that can wrap all the way around a finger, good knuckle & fingertip bandaids and some larger ones) and with a roll of hockey tape.

I recently discovered a type of bandage for treating cuts that would otherwise require stitches. It involves two interlocking halves that each get attached to opposite sides of the cut and are then pulled towards each other to close the wound and then adhered across it. Neat idea that doesn't take up a ton of space and could make a substantial difference, so those have been added.

Getting a bit deeper, and having had a bit of training, I have added a couple formable aluminum splints and homemade cloth triangles. I figure this is a worthwhile improvement over pieces of firewood, duct tape and ratchet straps should the need arise. That might be going farther than most folks want to consider, but having three active Varmints I decided it makes sense for me.

I will also suggest that there is merit in carrying some things that others may have the knowledge to put to use even if you yourself are not up to the task. For example, I have such things as a spare engine belt in The Bride's car. Not so much because I expect her to be able to replace the belt, but because I know there are others like me who given the correct part could have her back in operation in just a few minutes, but lacking those parts could do absolutely nothing. So while I don't carry the duffel bag of FAKs, I don't mind if others do. Put that in the hands of someone with training and it could make a big difference in someone's life.
 

Alanymarce

Rank II

Enthusiast II

298
Colombia
This is kind of what I am getting at.

In all honesty, how many people have ACTUALLY used their kit for something other than a Band-Aid, tweezers or trauma sheers to open a challenging plastic bag for dinner?

Now I am not dismissing be prepared. But at times, being overprepared is of far greater detriment, especially with people who have no to little training, jumping into a $800 "medical kit" to help someone. If it doesn't have an IV, fluids, sutures, IV meds, then what kind of self repairs are people providing to themselves out there?
We've used our kit on a few occasions, nearly all to help others, for example, in one campsite a child experienced a burn from a camp stove; the parents had no kit, and we were able to treat the burn with ours. So far, nothing really serious.

We have a kit which was put together professionally, and do know how to use it (and it cost far less than USD 800). One key point is to maintain the kit - one should check and replace items periodically/on expiry.
 
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El-Dracho

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Wherever you put it, it needs to be visible immediately, preferably from outside. There's not much point in having a first aid kit if you're unconscious and the good samaritans who could save you don't know where it is (or even that there is one).

Good advise! That´s why I have those stickers at the rear door of my rig:



Inside it lives securely in a proper bracket. It is accessible even if the backdoor is blocked somehow. And the fist aid kit is easily identifiable as such and marked with a sticker also. So this way, if the worst comes to the worst, it is easily findable for others also.