DIY Roof Top Tent Hoist

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AdamK

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I just built one similar to the one in the first post of this thread. I had a roof eave to deal with and used it for lateral support of the post.
20210121_135204.jpg

I clipped the top of the post to the tail of a roof truss to prevent it from moving side to side but it <could> move toward the driveway. There's a space between the post and the facia board to prevent the possibility of it push out on it.
20210119_145409.jpg

The back span is bolted to the header of the door opening to prevent any rotation around the axis of the post.
20210121_135051.jpg

Two double sheave pulleys, a trailer winch and some rope from amazon reduce the line tension 50 lbs for my 200 lbs tent.
20210121_135027.jpg
20210121_135100.jpg

Thanks to the OP for the idea. I used my structural engineering degree to make sure the member sizes were adequate. 200 lbs tent so there is 200 lbs compression in the post. The back span is 3' and the boom is 6' so there will be 400 lbs of upward force on the door header. I dangled my 202 lbs frame on the end of the boom to load test it. :) Not even a creak from the framing of my house.
 

Lanlubber In Remembrance

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I just built one similar to the one in the first post of this thread. I had a roof eave to deal with and used it for lateral support of the post.
View attachment 184902

I clipped the top of the post to the tail of a roof truss to prevent it from moving side to side but it <could> move toward the driveway. There's a space between the post and the facia board to prevent the possibility of it push out on it.
View attachment 184905

The back span is bolted to the header of the door opening to prevent any rotation around the axis of the post.
View attachment 184906

Two double sheave pulleys, a trailer winch and some rope from amazon reduce the line tension 50 lbs for my 200 lbs tent.
View attachment 184907
View attachment 184908

Thanks to the OP for the idea. I used my structural engineering degree to make sure the member sizes were adequate. 200 lbs tent so there is 200 lbs compression in the post. The back span is 3' and the boom is 6' so there will be 400 lbs of upward force on the door header. I dangled my 202 lbs frame on the end of the boom to load test it. :) Not even a creak from the framing of my house.
You did a good job of engineering. I'd hire you. The rope hanging off the bolt kinda threw me for awhile. I thought it was a small wheel until I enlarged the photo. Very good pictures too. I hope someone dosent try to pull an engine with it but it probably could.
 

AdamK

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You did a good job of engineering. I'd hire you. The rope hanging off the bolt kinda threw me for awhile. I thought it was a small wheel until I enlarged the photo. Very good pictures too. I hope someone dosent try to pull an engine with it but it probably could.
I'm going to use one of my snatch blocks on that bolt when I actually lift the tent. :) These photos are from my test of the rigging.

Looks like the Pentastar weighs about 350 lbs?? That might be pushing the capacity of the boom. They are at 835 psi bending stress with the 200 lbs tent. That's fine for your run of the mill Home Depot lumber. You'd have to check the specs on the rope, sheaves, etc, too. You'd definitely want to run some numbers before trying it with an engine.
 
Last edited:

DRAX

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This was something I tackled a few weeks back, I ended up re-installing the Lange power hoist-a-top that I had from when I owned a JKUR. Removed the donut stopper and now I can run 2 straps corner to corner to make an X over the top of the RTT, then hook the hoist to the straps and up (or down) she goes, all the way to the ceiling or all the way to the floor. No more asking neighbors to help lift it on/off (wife and daughters are too short to be effective), can have the RTT moved from where it's stored and on the truck in like 5-10 minutes start to finish, same when taking it off.

 

oldmate95

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I decided to use the receiver hitch and make my hoist attach to the Jeep. I basically used 2" square tubing with 1/8" walls, a couple of pulleys, and a hand crank winch to accomplish this. I used a 1 3/4" OD round tube inserted in the vertical part of the lower receiver portion to allow the crane to pivot around. The crane comes apart so it's easy to install/remove/store.
Thanks for the design & inspiration, I've been looking for something like this as I don't have a carport etc to hoist from. This'll give me a good excuse to buy a mig welder and practice!
Next step is to figure out some quick release brackets that'll work on my 3x rhino vortex bars. Fiddling with the ubolts with not a lot of hand space isn't fun! I want something a little more low profile than the Frontrunner quickrelease brackets, and half the price or less.
Perhaps some alloy angle or C channel bolted to the racks with some clevis pins & over-centre latches?
Similar to:
Great designs right here! But if you can lift 125 pounds, there is a much simpler way. A couple aluminum tracks and a strong back. I'm nearly 70 and I do this all the time.
check out the video
Cheers
 
Last edited:

Jayt4white

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So after a lot of online searching, I couldn't find a compact solution to hoisting my RTT on to my truck. My garage is too low so I can't lower it off the ceiling and drive away unfortunately. After a lot of brainstorming and about 3 trips to Lowes, below is my working hoist. I tested it with my weight (185lbs) first to be sure it would hold, and it didn't budge at all. My tent weighs about 135lbs so this solution works great.

I have 3 pulleys on it so the pull weight is down to 1/3 of the weight of the tent. It breaks down into two main pieces, the hoist arm, and the a-frame. The a-frame folds up so both pieces fit nicely in a small corner in the garage. If anyone is interested in further details let me know.





This is awesome! This will be perfect for me since my garage is too small for my truck. Would you mind sharing all the parts you bought for this set up? I really appreciate it.
 

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I just built one similar to the one in the first post of this thread. I had a roof eave to deal with and used it for lateral support of the post.
View attachment 184902

I clipped the top of the post to the tail of a roof truss to prevent it from moving side to side but it <could> move toward the driveway. There's a space between the post and the facia board to prevent the possibility of it push out on it.
View attachment 184905

The back span is bolted to the header of the door opening to prevent any rotation around the axis of the post.
View attachment 184906

Two double sheave pulleys, a trailer winch and some rope from amazon reduce the line tension 50 lbs for my 200 lbs tent.
View attachment 184907
View attachment 184908

Thanks to the OP for the idea. I used my structural engineering degree to make sure the member sizes were adequate. 200 lbs tent so there is 200 lbs compression in the post. The back span is 3' and the boom is 6' so there will be 400 lbs of upward force on the door header. I dangled my 202 lbs frame on the end of the boom to load test it. :) Not even a creak from the framing of my house.
Nice rig set up.
 

Smasho

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So after a lot of online searching, I couldn't find a compact solution to hoisting my RTT on to my truck. My garage is too low so I can't lower it off the ceiling and drive away unfortunately. After a lot of brainstorming and about 3 trips to Lowes, below is my working hoist. I tested it with my weight (185lbs) first to be sure it would hold, and it didn't budge at all. My tent weighs about 135lbs so this solution works great.

I have 3 pulleys on it so the pull weight is down to 1/3 of the weight of the tent. It breaks down into two main pieces, the hoist arm, and the a-frame. The a-frame folds up so both pieces fit nicely in a small corner in the garage. If anyone is interested in further details let me know.





That looks like the same thing I will need to fabricate. If you have the specs I would greatly appreciate it. You can email me at markottaviano@hotmail.com.
Thanks!
 

OcoeeG

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These hoists are nothing short of engineering marvels. But I have to wonder if it wouldn't just be easier to ask a neighbor and have a buddy over for a beer and ask him to help. Seems like a lot of work setting these hoists up.