Dealing with Snakes?

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phlfly

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I live on East cost, so VA, WVA, MD, NC, SC are all state with bunch ccopperheads and mouth cotton snakes.
So my question how are u dealing with them on overlading trips? I know don't step to touch but in forest and camping sight I don;t think about snake as my priority. I thought having a dog with it helps to scare away snake.
 

Landsat8

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I carry a Ruger gp-100 revolver in .357 magnum with hard cast lead bullets which would be useful against bear, and some homemade shotshell rounds for snakes. You can buy factory loaded shotshell rounds made by CCI in a variety of calibers, but be aware they will likely not cycle in semi auto handguns. Also the factory loads are quite expensive and my homemade loads have a higher capacity of lead shot and cost me pennies to make.
 

Desert Runner

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Shotshell is nice solution . If its not cycles it would be enough one shot if I stomp on aggressive copper head . Thanks
I think shotshells are not viable, except in a revolver. Keep a speedliader of self defense ammo in your pocket for 2 and 4 legged animals. Depending on where your at, snakes are the most likely critter you will meet.
I have seen forager rounds made for birds or rabbit sized game in handloader manuals. These were based on 19th century Army-Calvary 45/70 cartridges. Not very accurate except at close range due to the firearms RIFLING causing a donut affect. Expect that with the CCI rounds also.
I have the Indiana Jones mentality, when it comes to snakes. I almost stepped on a rattlesnake, even with careful placement of my feet while hiking once.
 

RickLB

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Just be careful using a gun, some parks they are not allowed and can get you in more trouble than that snake.

Do not step over logs, step on and step as far away as possible, keeps snakes from doing a reaction strike. Carry a walking stick use it to move them if no other way around. If you can go around them then do so and leave them be since we are intruding on their home.
 
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avgjoe624

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I spend ALOT of time in the NC/SC mountains and Copperheads, Cotton Mouths, Water Mocassins, Timber and Diamondback Rattlesnakes are EVERYWHERE. I see atleast a few everytime i go camping. My Solution is a Taurus Judge with a .410 round or a rock/stick. I understand snakes are living creatures and all that jazz, but with my kids, pets, and family around, every poisonous snake is a dead snake.
 

Desert Runner

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I spend ALOT of time in the NC/SC mountains and Copperheads, Cotton Mouths, Water Mocassins, Timber and Diamondback Rattlesnakes are EVERYWHERE. I see atleast a few everytime i go camping. My Solution is a Taurus Judge with a .410 round or a rock/stick. I understand snakes are living creatures and all that jazz, but with my kids, pets, and family around, every poisonous snake is a dead snake.
Yah, I have to follow that direction. My dog being bitten would upset me greatly. No kids, but I fall on the safe than sorry camp.

In Nevada it's rattlesnakes, in Southern nevada...it can also be a variant called a Mojave green. A very aggressive snake. The UP railroad actually posts a sign for rail crews along the track line as a reminder. It seems they like to nest between the rails,along the ties. So crews walking along can be prone to be bitten.
 

avgjoe624

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Yah, I have to follow that direction. My dog being bitten would upset me greatly. No kids, but I fall on the safe than sorry camp.

In Nevada it's rattlesnakes, in Southern nevada...it can also be a variant called a Mojave green. A very aggressive snake. The UP railroad actually posts a sign for rail crews along the track line as a reminder. It seems they like to nest between the rails,along the ties. So crews walking along can be prone to be bitten.
Just Googled it... im pretty glad we dont have them around here. Would love to have one on my wall with the other rattlers though. :smirk:
 
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trikebubble

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We live in a rattlesnake region, and I'm terrified of snakes, so I always keep an eye out. In the summer we stay away from areas that are known as "snaky" and do ourcamping and hiking at higher elevations. To add to the fun, one of our dogs is deaf, so we really have to watch out for her when hiking.
 

Enthusiast III

....I thought having a dog with it helps to scare away snake.
Not replying directly to you phlfly, but I've seen dogs mentioned a few times in this thread and I felt it important to mention -- Dogs are wonderful travel companions, but I wouldn't trust a dog to know "snakes = bad" without training. In fact, a dog's curiosity is very likely to increase the risk that it gets bit. I think folks should train their dogs about snakes if they plan to travel where poisonous snakes reside. You can use a dummy snake or a harmless one with some rewards for avoiding it. If you want to be fancy, train it to alert when it sees a snake. The key thing is: TRAINING. Train it to act the way you want it to, don't just assume it will. Of course, if the dog was raised around snakes it may well know better, but most city-based dogs never get that experience.

Yes, dogs have instincts that may in some cases tell them snakes are bad. But those same instincts tell them to eat excrement, so...training is better. I've been told there are Rattle snake vaccines for dogs, too, so if you are travelling in a place with snakes it may be worth seeing about vaccinating them. My wife is an expert on vet medicine so she may chime in later.

In terms of how we deal with them we've never given them much thought. Snakes, wolves, bears -- the general rule applies to all animals: They are more afraid of us than we are of them. Make a little bit of noise while hiking, keep an eye where you are putting your feet, and you are probably going to be OK. If there is one around, a long stick or shovel can encourage it to move on. Snakes do not prey on humans (folklore and outliers aside), so once the threat to them is minimized, they will go on about their business.

The shotgun or weapon approach may work fine in the lower 48 or Alaska, but it's not generally an option for travel to the rest of the world.
 

TerraCrawler

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Phlfly why did you leave out TN? We have tons of copperheads. If you are in an area where they are dense, you may wish to wear snake garters. You have to pay attention and be very aware, especially at night, use a flash light, walk slow, and be mindful. You are a GUEST in the home of the copperhead, they are not a pest, you are a visitor. Just be careful.
 
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Snakes hate mothballs get a few bags and spread around campsite, most snakes will run from you except the copperhead they will chase after you, atleast they do in my pond when im catfishing. Other than mothballs a gun or long machete is the answer.
 
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Roots66

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Yes, dogs have instincts that may in some cases tell them snakes are bad. But those same instincts tell them to eat excrement, so...training is better.
We have a dog and yes he will alert us of a potential danger, like a snake or any other animal he knows does not belong on the property. (he won't bother the chickens, but will fend off an owl or hawk) However, I would never trust him to actually protect anyone from a snake. The best snake deterrent (at least around your own property) is to remove any food source, like rabbits, rats & mice. Our cat does an amazing job of taking care of those, and has even killed smaller snakes as well. He's too smart to mess with the big boys. As for camping, I agree with the moth ball method and a .22 pistol with #12 snake shot loaded.
 
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Desert Runner

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Snakes hate mothballs get a few bags and spread around campsite, most snakes will run from you except the copperhead they will chase after you, atleast they do in my pond when im catfishing. Other than mothballs a gun or long machete is the answer.
I had not heard the mothball technique before. I will file that away for the future. Here in the West, it is just Rattlers you have to worry about. I also did not know that copperhead snakes were so aggressive. A 12 gauge sure would be a comfort item in that case.

I once read a story that in Africa, the rumor of a Black Mamba could clear a camp real quick. They also are known to be very aggressive, and will chase a person down.

That nightmare thought of you running with the snake right on your tail, while angling your gun over your shoulder, and pulling the trigger, hoping to get him before he got you.
 

Boostpowered

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I had not heard the mothball technique before. I will file that away for the future. Here in the West, it is just Rattlers you have to worry about. I also did not know that copperhead snakes were so aggressive. A 12 gauge sure would be a comfort item in that case.

I once read a story that in Africa, the rumor of a Black Mamba could clear a camp real quick. They also are known to be very aggressive, and will chase a person down.

That nightmare thought of you running with the snake right on your tail, while angling your gun over your shoulder, and pulling the trigger, hoping to get him before he got you.
Luckily copperheads are a whole lot slower than a mamba and a lot less poisonous, i dont know if it is the norm for them to chase folks but thats my experience every other venomous snake ive encounterd in north america tends to shy away from humans. I learned the moth ball thing from my great granmother back in the 80s. If i have a choice of snakes id rather encounter any rattle snake would be #1 since they let you know they are there some other non venomous species mimic the ratteler by shaking their tail in dry leaves. The worst snake here i know of to get bit by is the coral snake they have a doppleganger thats not poisonous the coral has red yellow and black bands the doppleganger has red black and yellow bands. The old saying for em went red on black friend of jack, red on yellow kills a fellow.
Snake.jpg
 

Desert Runner

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Luckily copperheads are a whole lot slower than a mamba and a lot less poisonous, i dont know if it is the norm for them to chase folks but thats my experience every other venomous snake ive encounterd in north america tends to shy away from humans. I learned the moth ball thing from my great granmother back in the 80s. If i have a choice of snakes id rather encounter any rattle snake would be #1 since they let you know they are there some other non venomous species mimic the ratteler by shaking their tail in dry leaves. The worst snake here i know of to get bit by is the coral snake they have a doppleganger thats not poisonous the coral has red yellow and black bands the doppleganger has red black and yellow bands. The old saying for em went red on black friend of jack, red on yellow kills a fellow.
View attachment 102752
Isn't that the Cornsnake?
 

Boostpowered

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Isn't that the Cornsnake?
Louisiana milk snake. i dont think they get as large as corn snakes they are same general size as the poisonous coral snake. Ive only seen corn snakes with the red black yellow coloration in pet stores. Coral snakes also dont have slit cat type eyes like most poisonous snakes, they are in the elapidae family same as cobras, they are the second most venomous snake behind the mamba but their fangs are too small to bite through a boot.